Gazetteer of Plasterers - B

BAILEY (BALE, BAYLEY, BAYLIE, BAYLYE), Thomas (fl. 1591; d. 1618)

A Plasterer of St Michael Bassishaw who was apprenticed to Edmond Essex on 24 November 1581. He obtained his freedom on 22 June 1591 and paid his beadleship fine on 28 July 1592. He presented as his apprentices: John Shawe (16 June 1598); William Baugh (27 April 1604); Stephen Duppa (12 March 1609/10); John Hubbard (3 June 1613). He made his mark to a Company order on 23 February 1616/17. He worked with Hugh Randall on the minister’s house in the parish of St Botolph without Aldersgate in 1601-02.[1] In 1607 Bailey was one of those paid for work by the Merchant Taylors’ Company prior to a royal visit to the Hall.[2] He made his last will on 6 June 1618, bequeathing 10s. and all of his working tools to his son William.[3] He named his wife executrix and signed the will with his mark. He was buried at St Michael Bassishaw on 26 June 1618.[4] Probate was granted on 11 July 1618.

BAILEY (BAYLEY), William (fl. 1614-33)

A Plasterer, the son of Thomas Bailey, who was freed by patrimony on 13 January 1614/15.

He signed a Company order on 23 February 1616/17. On 30 April 1638 his son William was made free by patrimony. His name only appears in connection with payment of arrearage and he continued as a member of the Yeomanry until at least 1633.

BALDWIN, Anthony (fl. 1618-25)

A Plasterer who was admitted to the Yeomanry of the Company on 4 August 1618. He was fined for absence on 11 August 1624 and his name does not appear again in the Quarterage Accounts after 1625. It may have been his widow Anne who received a charitable payment from the Company on 25 January 1626/7.

BALDWIN (BALDWYN, BAULDWIN), William (fl. 1604; d. 1624)

A Plasterer, the son of a Gloucestershire yeoman, who was apprenticed to Edmond Lake on 19 June 1600 and was admitted to the Yeomanry of the Company on 10 July 1607, when he paid 50s to avoid serving one year as a journeyman and donated a white silver spoon to the Company. He was committed for an unspecified offence on 25 January 1607/8 and paid a fine of 10s on 1 July 1608 for refusing beadleship. He presented Raphe Wilford on 30 September 1612 but the latter failed to complete his apprenticeship and Baldwin presented William Draper, the son of a Wiltshire chandler, on 8 July 1613. Baldwin’s name appears in the Quarterage Accounts from 1608-23 but is crossed through in 1624, indicating that he had died that year.

[He is possibly the man by the same name who married Audrey Ashwell at All Hallows, Lombard Street on 28 November 1613.[5]]

BARFIELD (BAREFELDE, BARFEILDE, BARFEYLD, BARFLYDE, BARFOLD), Richard (fl. 1577; d. 1603)

A Plasterer of St Botolph without Aldersgate. He was assessed as a householder in that parish at £4 in 1582 and £3 in 1598, 1599 and 1600.[6] His standing within the parish is underlined by a payment of 7s 2d for his time in 1601, probably in connection with the refurbishment of the minister’s house. Barfield was already a member of the Livery when he paid for a pattern for a renewed livery on 4 June 1574. He served as Junior Warden (1577-8), Senior Warden (1585-6 and 1588-9) and Master of the Plasterers’ Company (1589-90). He was a senior member of the Company and was in a position to contribute financially when difficulties arose (23 December 1596). He received payments from the Tallow Chandlers’ Company (alongside ‘Burton the plasterer’, probably Robert Burton) in connection with the roof of their company hall. The payment of £13 9s 4d ‘for stuff and his paynes’ (1584-5) was followed by a payment of 14s ‘for whyting the Ceyling in the hall’ (1585-6).[7] Between 1577 and 1594 Barfield and his team were employed to make fret ceilings by Sir John Petre at Old Thorndon Hall, Essex.[8] A contract was signed in 1587 to decorate the hall ceiling there with his apprentice and a labourer. Together with John Adams, he decorated the new fountain at Hampton Court with fretwork in 1591-92.[9] His position as Plasterer to the Fishmongers’ Company was terminated in 1602 because ‘he did misuse the Company openly in scorning them’ and was ‘very talkative and full of words’.[10] He was fined for ill work on several occasions: at ‘the Spittle’ (23 August 1594), at the Sessions House (3 November 1601), at an unspecified site (30 April 1602) and in St Bartholomew’s (12 November 1602). He presented numerous apprentices: James Reade (who was returned to Simon Betaugh on 24 November 1581); Henry Cobbe (13 October 1577); James Warren (8 December 1579); George Sherad (13 October 1585); Edward Robinson (2 September 1586); Hugh Meyborne (12 September 1586); William Gould (23 November 1593); John Moore (10 January 1594/5); William Poulye (13 March 1599/1600); Walter Marwyn (18 February 1601/2); Michael Brooke (14 May 1602).

In 1590 John Laycock nominated Barfield as one of the overseers of his will and left him 3s 4d for his pains. Barfield made his own final will while sick on 25 September 1603.[11] He named his wife, Marie, executrix, and bequeathed £20 to his daughter Ethelred James, which was to be given to her after her mother’s death. Barfield’s other daughter Anne was to receive £20 when she married and £20 when her mother died. William James, Barfield’s son-in-law, was bequeathed his best cloak and his grosgrain cassock and hose. His sister Elizabeth was left 10s. for a mourning ring and her husband, Thomas Person, was bequeathed Barfield’s gown faced with budge and his best cape. A cousin, Thomas Fisher, was bequeathed a Spanish leather jerkin and Barfield’s black holiday doublet. Fisher’s wife was bequeathed a 10s. ring, and 10s. was to be given to each of  their children when they came to marry. Another cousin, Anne Thickness, was left a 10s. ring and 10s. was to be given to each of her children when they married. Thomas Bagnall and Thomas Person were named overseers and probate was granted on 19 October 1603. His widow made a nuncupative will on 1 June 1609, in which she divided her whole estate (valued at £77 19s 10d) between her two daughters. Her will was proved on 10 June 1609.[12]

BARNES, John (fl. 1608; d. after 1638 and before 1652)

A Plasterer who worked under Richard Dungan at Salisbury House in 1608.[13] He was freed as the late apprentice of Dungan on 26 March 1613 but no presentation had been recorded for him. In 1630 he was working under William Bennett at Lionel Cranfield’s London house in St Bartholomew’s.[14] He continued to pay quarterage, usually in arrears, until his appointment as Assistant Beadle on 18 October 1638. He was granted reversion of the office of Beadle but died before this could happen. Two charitable payments were made to his widow, Joan, on 2 December 1652 and 25 January 1652/3.

BARNWELL (BARNEWELL), Robert (fl. 1619-33)

A Plasterer, the son of a Huntingdon clerk, who was apprenticed to George Stephenson on 6 August 1619 for 8 years. He was freed on 13 March 1626/7 and paid an additional fee for being freed early. He paid his contribution to a Company assessment on 23 April & 29 May 1627, and on 25 July 1628, when he was additionally fined for absence from the Hall. He is recorded in the Quarterage Accounts as having died in 1633.

BARNWELL (BARNEWELL), Thomas (fl. 1623; d. 1626)

A Plasterer, the son of a yeoman from Nassington, Northamptonshire, who was apprenticed to Richard Cobb on 30 April 1616 and freed on 30 July 1624. He died in 1626.

BARRETT, Matthew (fl. 1591-1634)

A Plasterer who was presented as an apprentice by Edmond Essex on 13 October 1582 and turned over to Robert Burton on 11 September 1590, before being freed on 3 December 1591 and paying his beadleship fine on 29 August 1592. He incurred a fine on 11 December 1596 because he had allowed a boy to work for him without being registered for over six months and thereupon presented his apprentice Richard Morris. Others followed: William Bowes of Cheshunt, Hertfordshire(26 April 1611); Francis Browne, son of a Yorkshire husbandman (25 March 1614). His son, Henry, was apprenticed to Richard Terrey on 19 March 1623/4 and another son, Thomas, was freed by patrimony on 4 September 1634. He was fined for ill work in Bishopsgate (3 November 1601). He was regularly employed on routine plastering task-work in the Royal Works at sites outside London: Royston (1609-10 and 1621-22)[15]; Theobalds Park (1611-12)[16]; Newmarket, stables and brewhouse (1617-18 and 1622-3) and, with Romayne Cocke, the office of works there (1619-20).[17] Barrett continued to pay quarterage until 1633 and on 13 October 1634 he received a charitable payment and was made a pensioner of the Company.

BARRETT, Richard (fl. 1624-39)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Hugh Miller on 15 March 1608/9 and not freed until 28 May 1624. He was still paying his quarterage dues on 4 December 1639, when he was also fined for absence.

BARRYE (BARRE, BARR), William (fl. 1573; d. 1605)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate recorded at the baptism of a daughter Joane (5 March 1575/6); a daughter (24 February 1582/3); a daughter, Sybil (30 May 1585) and a son William (18 August 1588), and the burial of Sybil (4 November 1585). ‘William Barre howseholder’ was buried on 19 January 1604/5.[18] He paid an unspecified fine on 1 September 1571 and another for an offence to Thomas Brigges on 8 August 1573. He was fined for not wearing a gown or cloak on 6 April 1582. His apprentices were: William Echell I (6 November 1573); John Lambert (2 February 1589/90); Morgan Roberts (20 July 1590); George Marsh (6 November 1590); Thomas Walter/Waters (16 June 1595); Richard Thomas (2 July 1603); William Britten (11 August 1604). In March 1580/1 he was among the contributors to the cost of the Parliamentary Bill relating to artificers. A debt that he was owed by John Griffyn was settled according to a memorandum on 5 November 1596. Widow Barre’s man was sent to the Compter on 25 March 1606.

BATCHELOR (BATCHELER, BATCHELLOR), John (fl. 1626-52)

A Plasterer, son of a chandler from Kingscliffe, Northamptonshire, who was apprenticed to Abraham Eyrdall on 6 August 1619. He was freed on 11 August 1626. He contributed to a Company assessment on 1 August 1627, 23 April 1634 and again on 14 October 1633. He paid his beadleship fine on 25 July 1632 and took as apprentices: Richard Hills on 18 June 1634; John Toppine, the son of a Cumberland yeoman, on 23 April 1641. On 28 May 1638 a caveat was served against ‘Batchellors man’. On 24 June 1647 his apprentice, Reynold Atkinson, was freed but Batchellor was fined for not enrolling him and for freeing him early. His son, Thomas, was freed by patrimony on 11 March 1649/50. He was fined for absence and bad work on 7 November 1639. He entered the Livery on 13 September 1644 and paid the first instalment of the levy, followed on 13 October 1644, 23 April and 25 July 1645, 13 September 1647. On that date he was warned that he would be dismissed from the Livery if he did not pay his outstanding fines for bad work. He paid an unspecified fine on 1 June 1648. He is last recorded as paying quarterage on 14 October 1652.

BATH, John (fl. 1599; d. 1610)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Morgan Dowlinge on 4 November 1592. On 30 November 1599 he made payments in lieu of serving one year as a journeyman and for his abling. He was sent to the Compter for an unspecified transgression on 6 February 1600/01; and on 14 August of the same year he paid his beadleship fine. Thomas Davis was fined for using ill language to Bath on 10 December 1602. Bath took two apprentices: William Smewen for 8 years on 1 February 1604/5 and Richard Cooke on 14 October 1605. On 27 June 1606 Bath received charity. He paid his quarterage until 1609 and his death was recorded in 1610.

BAWDWUNE (fl. 1566-67)

A plasterer paid for work by the Skinners’ Company in 1566-67.[19]

[Possibly William BAWDEKYN, working at Hampton Court in 1531,[20] or Robert BAWDEN, working at Woking (1534-5)[21] and Greenwich (1538-9).[22]]

BEALER, Walter (fl. 1605-1606)

A plasterer who worked at the church of Holy Trinity the Less in 1605-06.[23]

BEARD, Thomas (fl. 1571-7)

A Plasterer who was admitted to the Company on 1 September 1571. He paid an unspecified fine in two instalments on 27 June and 8 August 1572. He paid another fine on 15 February 1576/7, the last occasion on which his name appears. He must have died before 1604 when the Quarterage records begin as his name does not appear.

BECK, John I (fl. c 1600; d. 1625)

A plasterer of St Anne Blackfriars who was not a member of the London Company. The parish registers of St Bride Fleet Street record the baptism of a son Richard (6 January 1605/6) and the burials of a daughter Anne (19 August 1625); Rebecca (12 September 1625). Beck died of plague and was buried at St Anne Blackfriars on 30 August 1625.[24]  

BECK (BECKE), John II (b. c 1590; d. 1625)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Yorkshire yeoman and was apprenticed to Henry Stanley for 7 years on 29 January 1607/8. He was turned over to Richard Ratcliffe on 5 April 1611 and obtained his freedom on 17 July 1614. He paid arrearage of quarterage on 8 May 1623 and his name was crossed through the list in 1624.

BELL, John (fl. 1590)

A Plasterer who, on 6 July 1590, presented Henry Winter as his apprentice when it was ordered that ‘John Bell the Master of Henrye Wynter shall if the said Henry Wynter shall well and trulye serve the said John Bell as an apprentice during the terme of his apprenticehood beare all the charges of making of the said Henrye free’.

BELLETT, Benet (fl. 1550)

In 1550 Bellett was a witness, as a plasterer, to the admission of an apprentice to the freedom of the City.[25]

BELLOWES, Richard (fl. 1539-74)

A Plasterer working in the Royal Works at Canterbury (1539)[26], Greenwich (1539-40)[27] and Rochester (1541-2)[28]. On 27 August 1554 the Court of Aldermen received a report on the matters in dispute between English and Irish members of the Plasterers’ Company. The Company was ordered to hold elections that represented the Irish as well as the English members. Bellowes was one of the three who reported back on 22 October 1554 that the election had been held according to the order and that the Senior Warden, Oliver Thomas, was English and the Junior Warden, Simon Betaugh, was Irish.[29] In 1569 Bellowes worked with Thomas Ratcliffe for 9 days at Lincoln’s Inn at 6d per day.[30] He presented Thomas Graystock as his apprentice on 29 February 1571/2 and paid for the return of Edmund Harryson on 6 February 1572/3. On 4 June 1574 he was listed as one of those who should only pay 6s 8d for their dinner.

BENNET, Henry (fl. 1614-20; d. 1620/21)

A Plasterer who was the son of John, ‘late of the precinct of the blackfryars, Tailor deceased’, Henry was apprenticed to Humfrey Dovey for 10 years on 17 August 1604. He was freed on 13 April 1614 and his name continued to appear in the Quarterage Accounts until crossed through in 1621.

BENNET, John (fl. 1590; d. before 1604)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to William Barr on 8 March 1582/3. He paid his abling fine on 23 April 1590 and donated a silver spoon to the Company on 11 October of that year. On 9 September 1591 he paid his beadleship fine and on 17 March 1594/5 he presented an apprentice, Thomas Burton. He was one of a number of plasterers accused by the Painter-Stainers’ Company of intermeddling, in their suit brought to the Court of Star Chamber in 1594.[31] His name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts, beginning in 1604.

BENNET, William (c 1588-1632)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Norfolk labourer and was apprenticed to Randall Clarkson for 8 years on 7 September 1604 and freed on 4 November 1612. William Bennet of St Giles Cripplegate was recorded at the baptism of a daughter, Joane, on 27 November 1614 and was probably the man by the same name who had married Joane Lockley on 10 February 1613/14.[32] There were numerous fines for bad work throughout his career: in Red Cross Street (11 November 1613); at Holborn Bridge (with Richard Hill, 6 November 1616); in Bevis Marks (29 May 1617); in the Postern (13 February 1618); at the White Swan, Old Fish Street (8 November 1627); at the Mitre, Wood Street (22 October 1630); in Cornhill (21 February 1631). He paid his beadleship fine on 29 May 1617 but was apparently in dispute with the Company in 1618-19, involving visits to the Sessions House, Mr Recorder’s, Lord Chief Justice’s, Lord Mayor’s and the Guildhall. On 3 December 1619 the matter appears to have been resolved when Bennet paid his fine for not serving one year as a journeyman. Despite this, he was ‘chosen into the liverie’ on 22 August 1621. He stood unsuccessfully for election as Junior Warden in 1628 but was elected in 1629 when the first choice could not be found. In 1630 Bennet worked with John Barnes and the apprentice Robert Mathews for the Earl of Middlesex at St Bartholomew’s.[33] On 4 February Mathews had been turned over to Bennet. Although it was routine work it did involve ‘Cooller and syses’. Another apprentice, Robert Norris, seems never to have been presented by his master. Bennet made his mark, rather than signed his name, to a Company memorandum on 23 April 1631. On 10 August 1632 a funeral supper was held for Mr Bennet at the Corner house. Widow Bennet was listed as an Assistant and appears to have run the business until she received charity in 1646.

BENSON (BENTSON), Robert (fl. 1609-10)

A plasterer working for the Royal Works at Nonsuch in 1609-10, where he was carrying out routine repairs to Lord Carew’s kitchen and lodgings above.[34] He was working alongside Edmond Dillon (the only other plasterer employed on a small routine plastering job) and they both may have been locally employed.

BETAUGH (BEDAUGH, BEDELL), John (fl. 1573-1602)

A Plasterer who was already free of the Company before 1573. He presented the following apprentices: Richard Gibson (3 July 1573); Edward Echell (4 August 1581 but later turned over to John Walfleet); Matthew Thorlton (5 March 1589/90); William Bankes (24 July 1594); Robert Wigmore was turned over to Leonard Smyth (28 April 1600). He was brought to Ward with some bricklayers on 14 February 1577/8 and ‘apprehended’ on 23 November 1593. On 1 March 1593/4 he was carried to the Compter. A fine was imposed on 28 April 1599 for arresting Thomas Widmore without licence to do so. On 8 February 1599/1600 the Company paid for several visits to the Lord Mayor about various members, including Betaugh, who was sent again to the Compter. He received charity on 24 April and 28 July 1602, the last occasion on which his name appeared. According to the will of William Betaugh I, John was the father of Robert Betaugh.

BETAUGH (BEDAUGH), Lawrence (fl. 1624; d. 1624)

A Plasterer who was the son of William Betaugh, a gentleman of Lawrencetown, Co. Meath, Ireland, and was presented by Robert Betaugh on 30 April 1616. He was freed on 7 May 1624 but his name is crossed through in the Quarterage Accounts for that year, when he probably died.

BETAUGH (BEDAUGH, BEDALL), Robert (fl. 1590; d. 1641)

A Plasterer of St Margaret Fish Street, Robert was the son of John Betaugh, according to the will of William Betaugh I. His name first appears when he paid his abling fine on 11 September 1590. He took the following apprentices: William Hadwell (24 July 1594); Thomas Meyborne (27 April 1597); Patrick Welsh (27 September 1598, turned over to John Terry on 8 February 1599/1600); John Thomas (29 July 1608); Thomas Griggs (freed 11 November 1614); Thomas Grafton (13 January 1614/15 & again 1 May 1617); Lawrence Betaugh (30 April 1616); Edward Bygrave (30 July 1624); Thomas Todd @ Call (30 April 1629) . Robert’s son William was made free by patrimony on 30 April 1616. He was fined on 23 August 1594 for setting his man to work before he was bound. He signed a memorandum on 27 April 1597 agreeing that if his runaway apprentice returned at any time he would be brought to the hall ‘to be ordered at the Companyes pleasure’. Betaugh entered the Livery in 1598, paying for the pattern on 14 August. His absence led to a fine on 23 February 1598/9. When he was in dispute with Walter Hill about his ex-apprentice Mr Browne and Mr Ratcliffe were chosen to settle the matter (21 August 1609) and on 31 August he was fined for selling his apprentice to Hill. He paid his contribution to the Irish Plantation in two instalments (7 August 1612 & 12 May 1613).

Betaugh became the Company Beadle and received his fee on 26 July 1619, with additional payments for ‘his extraordinary pains’ on 3 & 15 December of that year. He continued to receive wages as Beadle until he was dismissed on 12 December 1623 but on 26 November 1624 he was paid, as Beadle, for a pair of shoes and for his extraordinary pains ‘about the souldiers’. A fine for ‘unseemlie words in court to Davis’ was imposed on 13 March 1626/7. Fees were paid to him from 1626-30, with an extra 2s 6d for shoes in 1628. He received a benevolence on 23 April 1627. Betaugh was dismissed as Beadle again on 26 May 1631 for abusing Mr Warden [John] Taylor, until the Company decided to reinstate him or choose someone else, at Mr John Allen’s discretion. He did not have to wait long as he received payment again on 21 June 1631. On 9 September 1633 he borrowed from the Company £1 ‘for to shew the Bricklayers’ which he had not repaid by 14 October; but on 25 July 1634 he received 10s in recompense for suing a bricklayer. On 13 November 1634 a payment was made for ‘Staffes and Ribbing’ for Betaugh. On 18 October 1638 a memorandum recorded the appointment of John Barnes as Assistant Beadle as Robert Betaugh’s ‘age and inability prevent him from carrying out the Beadle’s duties properly’ but this order was crossed through and on 22 November 1638 John Smith was appointed Assistant Beadle. On 7 November 1639 a dispute with Widow Avis was resolved when she agreed to pay him 8s in weekly instalments. It was recorded on 25 July 1640 that Henry Wilson was to be paid £4 per annum as assistant to Robert Betaugh. The latter received charity on 13 October 1640 and on 26 January 1640/1 payment was made to ‘ould Betaughes widow’. Betaugh had made his final will on 14 January 1639/40, leaving 18d. each to his son William and his daughter Elizabeth Grace, adding that ‘both of which I have long since preferred and have given them before this time a greate part of my estate’.[35] He left the residue of his estate to his wife Alice, who was named executrix. The will was witnessed by Thomas Poole and John Esson. Probate was granted on 2 February 1640/41.

BETAUGH (BEDAGHE, BEDAUGH, BEDILL, BEEDALL, BETAGS, BETOUGHE, BYDE), Simon (fl. 1536; d. 1586)

A Plasterer of St Mary Aldermanbury, of Irish birth or descent. He was employed in the Royal Works at Hampton Court (1536-9),[36] Oatlands (1537-8),[37] Rochester (1541-2)[38] and Dartford (1542).[39] On 27 August 1554 the Court of Aldermen received a report on the matters in dispute between English and Irish members of the Plasterers’ Company. The Company was ordered to hold elections that represented the Irish as well as the English members. Richard Bellowes, Robert and William Bowdelle reported back on 22 October 1554 that the election had been held according to the order and that the Senior Warden, Oliver Thomas, was English and the Junior Warden, Simon Betaugh, was Irish.[40] Betaugh served as Master of the Plasterers’ Company in 1570-71, 1578-79 and 1584-85. Although elected Master in 1583 he did not serve ‘because he was in Irelonde’ (11 September). In 1561 he and Cornelius Hand were paid for eight days’ routine work for the Carpenters’ Company.[41] In 1568-69 Betaugh, Thomas Bird, Thomas Whitfield and others were paid for work at the Bakers’ Company hall in the expansion of the parlour into the garden.[42] Betaugh was paid again for work at the Bakers’ Company in 1568-69 and at the church of St Mary Aldermanbury in 1576-77.[43] In 1571-72 he was paid 3s. 4½d. by the churchwardens of St Mary Aldermanbuy for a day’s work, with laths, lime, nails and a bushel of hair to mend walls. His parish church employed him again for work at the Curate’s house in 1576-77. [44] As a householder of the parish he was assessed at £3 in 1982.[45]

As a senior member of the Company he was entitled to several apprentices at any one time (10 September 1576) and presented the following: James Fullam (27 June 1572); Andrew King (13 October 1573); Nicholas Betaugh (29 January 1573/4); John Coxe (Betaugh paid for his return 30 April 1574); anonymous (14 March 1575/6); paid for the return of an unnamed apprentice (13 October 1576); Patrick Cahan (25 January 1576/7); Patrick Linehan (26 July 1577); Richard Robinson (who was borrowed on 23 April 1580 and returned to Edmond Essex on 6 April 1582); Edmond Dillon (4 August 1581); James Reade (paid for his return from Richard Barfield 24 November 1581); anonymous (13 October 1582); John Browne (25 July 1583); Thomas Smyth (turned over to Robert Cusack 16 June 1586, presumably as a result of Betaugh’s death). On 4 June 1574 it was agreed that several members, including Betaugh, should only pay 6s 8d for their dinners. He paid for ‘an Armyng Swoorde of the howse’ on 12 February 1579/80. He was one of the arbitrators appointed to settle the dispute between Richard and William Brigges (31 January 1583/4). Mister Betaugh’s son (presumably William) was paid for copying out names (13 October 1585). Bad language against Raphe Bettes resulted in a fine on 17 December 1585.

In an undated letter addressed ‘to the Right Hon. my Lord of Downesayeney at Mrs. Taylores at Torneberrey’ Betaugh requests Dunsaney to write to his father-in-law, Sir Christopher Barnewell, and the rest of his friends in Ireland, to deliver to the writer's son, Thomas, money to discharge the credit he is bound in for Dunsaney, or he will have to forsake London wherein his living lies. He has undone himself for Dunsaney, unless he causes his friends to give better credit to his son than they do. Has had two letters of Dunsaney's here these ten days, and never a friend of Dunsaney's would send them, so that he was fain to hire one to bring them.—London.’[46]?

Betaugh made his will on 22 March 1586 and it was proved on 13 April that year.[47] He requested burial in the cloister of his parish church and appointed his son William I as executor, exhorting his son Thomas not to dispute the terms of the will as his father had ‘already advanced him to the best of his ability.’ Alice, his second wife, was to remain in occupation of his house in Aldermanbury for 3 years, provided she did not remarry. The Inquisition post mortem taken on 22 June 1586 recorded that at the time of his death he was in possession of two properties on Christchurch Street in St Katherine Cree, and two new buildings built in the gardens of these properties.[48] He had purchased these from Robert Harris and William Barker, Gent, in 1561. The inquisition reported that the two tenements in Black Raven Alley in St Katherine Cree were left to his wife Alice, and that after her death to his son William. The will also cites James Betaugh, ‘now dwelling with me’, the son of his nephew Patrick. Simon Betaugh died on 2 April 1586, leaving 20s to the Livery of the Company for a burial repast.                              

BETAUGH, William I (d. 1596)

The Company spent money at William Betaugh’s funeral on 13 August 1596, although he is described as ‘gentleman’ (rather than as a Plasterer) in his will, which was made on 13 and proved on 20 August 1596.[49] His name is included in this gazetteer as he was a son of Simon Betaugh and his will supplies evidence for relationships between the numerous members of the Betaugh family. It was he who bequeathed the properties in Black Raven Alley to Robert Betaugh, subsequently owned by Simon.

BETAUGH (BETALPH), William II (fl. 1616; d. 1664)

The son of Robert Betaugh, William became a Plasterer by patrimony on 30 April 1616 and was admitted to the Yeomanry of the Company. He presented apprentices as follows: Francis Fulborne (28 May 1624); John Crisp (3 February 1625/6); Jonathan Hicks (7 February 1632/3); Thomas Welshe (23 April 1636); Peter Fuller (4 December 1639); William Chapman (13 October 1640); William Betaugh III, his son (25 July 1646; freed by patrimony 25 July 1657); John Falkenor (13 August 1649); John Nickes (5 September 1655); John Hull (25 January 1655/6); George Hancock (30 June 1658). On 10 October 1645 he testified to the validity of Thomas Terrey’s freedom by patrimony, as the son of Robert Terrey, Citizen and Plasterer of London. He was fined for keeping three apprentices on 10 January 1655/6 and on 25 of that month he paid another fine for not enrolling John Hull, late apprentice of John Addison, and for freeing him early. Fines for absence were imposed on 24 October 1626, 1 August 1639 and 25 July 1650; and for lateness on 26 January 1640/1. On 11 May 1629 William paid for his ‘pattern of cloth’ and made a gift of £3 to the Company on his admittance to the Livery. He was able to sign with his name rather than a mark. He stood successfully in the election for Junior Warden on 14 September 1635. He was unsuccessful in the election for Senior Warden on 10 September 1638 but was elected to that post on 9 September 1639. On 25 January 1640/1 he paid over the outstanding balance from the Wardens’ account. Betaugh was unsuccessful in the election for Master in September 1642 but was elected to the post the following year (11 September 1643). He stood again unsuccessfully on 14 September 1657. He was one of the signatories to a Company memorandum about reducing the expense of ‘feasting at Hall’ (25 July 1660) and was among the Assistants who were to form a committee to consider the renewal of the Company’s charter following the Restoration (13 October 1661). William Betaugh, resident of All Hallows Barking made his final will on 12 July 1664.[50] He left 5s. to his son William, £5 to his daughter, Dennis Jackson, £5 to his daughter, Elizabeth Bird, and the rest of his estate to his wife Edith who was named sole executrix. Probate was granted on 30 September 1664.

BETTES, Henry (fl. 1587; d. 1620)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate recorded in the parish registers at the baptism of a daughter Catherine (19 April 1579) and the burials of his children, Catherine (22 October 1580); John (11 November 1582); Alice (7 July 1587); his wife Alice (7 November 1600), a second wife Margaret (11 August 1603), and a servant, Hester Bestmeate (21 August 1603).[51] He is recorded as a member of the Yeomanry of the Company from 1605 until his death in 1620.

[Possibly the Harry Bettes whose daughter was baptised at St Stephen Coleman Street (20 January 1569/70); William (11 March 1570/1); John (9 October 1572); Elizabeth (31 January 1574); (Susan) 30 December 1575. He was bound for £20 at the Middlesex Sessions Court of 3 August 1582 to appear at the next meeting to answer to the charge that he had kept company all night with a ‘lightwoman’ (i.e. a prostitute) in the notoriously bawdy Turnmill Street.[52]]

BETTES, Henry II (fl. 1608; d. 1620)

A Plasterer admitted to the Yeomanry of the Company in 1605. He died in 1620.

BETTES (BETTS), John I (fl. 1567-1578)

A Plasterer, and Master of the Plasterers’ company jointly with Ralph Bettes in 1577-78. In Michaelmas term 1567 he was accused by the Painter-Stainer John Cooper of intermeddling at the Court of the Kings’ Remembrancer.[53] Possibly the John Bettes whose son and namesake was baptised at St Stephen Coleman Street on 19 December 1579.[54]

[Possibly the plasterer John Betts who was working with Harry Higgins at the Ironmongers’ Hall in 1548.[55]]

BETTES (BETT), John II (fl. 1615; d. 1624)

A Plasterer who was presented by Humfrey Dovey (26 May 1607) and made free (19 May 1615). However, on 31 October 1615 he signed an agreement promising to pay 10s as he was allowed an apprentice, although an ‘imbroaderer’ and a young man lately made free. He continued to pay quarterage as a member of the Yeomanry until he died in 1624.

BETTES, Olyver (fl. 1580; d. before 1599)

A Plasterer who, according to the will of Ralph Bettes, was the latter’s son but predeceased his father. He had paid his abling fine on 24 June 1580 but in the Court Book of the Carpenters’ Company it was recorded at the meeting held on 24 October 1581 that he was ’committed from the companie of the plasterers unto this Companie before the Chamberlayne’.[56]

BETTES, Ralph (Raphe, Rauf) (fl. 1561; d. 1599)

A Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street. Bettes served as Master of the Plasterers’ Company in 1575-76 and 1577-78 (jointly with John Bettes), 1582-83, 1586-87, and 1590-91. He was recorded in the parish registers at the baptism of a daughter Francesca (30 August 1561), a son John (27 March 1569), a daughter Elizabeth (24 August 1582). In 1575-76 Bettes, Richard Brigges and Thomas Browne were subcontracted by the Bricklayer John Taylor to work at the old house of the Dowager Lady Sheffield at Blackfriars and its new extension.[57] In Michaelmas term 1567 he was accused by the Painter-Stainer John Cooper of intermeddling at the Court of the Kings’ Remembrancer.[58] He was assessed as a householder of St Stephen Coleman Street in 1577 at £6 and £8 in 1582.[59] Other plasterers who were also parishioners of St Stephen in 1582 included Richard Briggs and William Bottom. According to an order made by the Lord Mayor and aldermen on 14 February 1586/7, when settling a dispute between the senior members of the Plasterers’ Company and the Yeomanry, regarding the number of apprentices bound by ‘Raphe Bettes now Mr of the same Companye and Thomas Kelley late Mr of the same Companye’, the aldermen found in favour of Bettes and [Thomas] Kellie ‘in respecte as well of their age and unhabilities to woorke as of the great paines Chardges and travaile by them susteyned for the benefitt of their said Companye’.[60] In 1590 he and Richard Barfield served as overseers to the will of John Laycock. Bettes also witnessed the will. In 1594 Briggs was one of a number of plasterers accused of intermeddling by the Painter-Stainers’ Company in their complaint to Star Chamber.[61]

Bettes made his final will on 21 December 1599, leaving numerous legacies in cash and property. He asked to be buried next to his wife on the north side of St Stephen Coleman Street.[62] He cited four children by his first marriage, Richard, who had reached his majority, Elizabeth, who had recently married, and Ralph and Susan who were both in their minorities and were yet to marry. He left his son Richard £100 and forgave him of a debt of £80. Ralph was bequeathed £120, which he was to receive when twenty-three. Elizabeth was left £90, toward £150 which had been promised as a dowry for her marriage to George Gilstroppe. Susan was left £150, which she would receive when she reached twenty-one. Richard was also left his father’s best satin doublet and his wife Mary £6. Ralph was left Bettes’s best coat and best cloth jerkin, both welted with velvet, his best gascoignes, best cloak and best hat. Susan was left a ‘faire mantell’ and all the children’s linen that had belonged to her mother.

Bettes set aside 40s. to pay for bread to be distributed to the poor of St Stephen Coleman Street, and 40s. to the Livery of the Plasterers’ Company to accompany his body on the day of his funeral and to be enjoyed ‘uppon a drinking or repast immediatlie after my burial’. Mr Hall and Mr Denman, masters of the Bridgehouse, and John Reeve, Carpenter were likewise left 10s. for a repast at the wake. A further 6s. 8d. was left for the workmen of the Bridgehouse to the same end. 20s. was left to his cousin Margery Spencer, and 20s. ‘gemowe’ of gold to his ‘loveing frend and sister mistres Gilstropp widdowe’. There were also bequests to John Male, Scrivenor (20s.); Margery Trenis wife of John Trenis (40s.); John Trenis (20s.); his goddaughter, the daughter of Josias Hitchen (20s.) John Hartley (20s). His former apprentices Nicholas Bowland, Thomas Atkinson, Walter Hill, and Henry Cordey were left 3s. 4d. each, and were asked to be the pallbearers at his funeral. His two apprentices, Peter Hill and Richard Hill were left 20s. and ‘all my Ladders plancks poles payles sives and other my working tooles equallie to be devided betweene them and to be delivered at the expiracon’ of their apprenticeships. This was on the proviso that they were turned over to other members of the company. Bettes asked that the provision be made for sureties at the Court of Orphans to manage the money set aside for his two youngest children, Ralph and Susan.  All his moveable goods from his house on Coleman Street were to be divided amongst his children. He named his son Richard executor, and his ‘loving frends’ John Mayle, Hugh Capp, and John Sweete as overseers. A garden in Nottingham was left to his daughter’s eldest son.  Ralph Bettes was buried at St Stephen Coleman Street on 26 December 1599.[63] After his death his estate was valued by the Court of Orphans at £622 8s. 2d.[64] Probate was granted on 9 April 1600.

BETTES, Richard (fl. 1600)

The son of Ralph Bettes, who was freed by patrimony on 8 January 1599/1600 but does not appear to have been active as a plasterer. His name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts so it is likely that he died before 1605. As the eldest surviving son of Ralph, he was appointed executor of his father’s will.

BETTES (BETTS), Thomas (fl. 1580; d. before 1604)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine on 24 June 1580 and was made free on 19 August. On 11 November of that year he was fined for ‘evill language’. He was a contributor on 25 March 1580/1 to the costs of a parliamentary bill put forward by the Plasterers’ Company and paid his fine for beadleship on 26 July of that year. As a householder in the Parish of St Giles he was assessed at £5 in 1582.[65] He presented John Hanson as an apprentice on 25 January 1590/1 but neither master nor apprentice is named in the records again.

BILBRO, Richard (b. c. 1564; d. 1589)

A plasterer of St Botolph without Aldgate buried aged twenty-five on 5 January 1588/9.[66]

BILLING (BILLON), James (fl. 1594; d. 1618)

A Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street, recorded in the Yeomanry of the Company from 1605 until his death. He was one of a number of plasterers accused by the Painter-Stainers’ Company of intermeddling in their suit who were brought to the Court of Star Chamber in 1594.[67] He was one of the numerous plasterers paid at the rate of 2s. for work at Merchant Taylors’ Hall in 1607.[68] In 1608 and 1610 he was paid for work at St Lawrence Jewry.[69] His only apprentice was Bartholomew Clarke, son of a Buckinghamshire husbandman, who was presented for 9 years on 12 August 1614. Billing was buried at St Stephen Coleman Street on 11 March 1617/18.[70]

BILLING, John (fl. 1578-1579)

A plasterer, working as part of the team led by William Bottom, paid for work by the Drapers’ Company in 1578-79.[71]

[John may be a Clerk’s error for James.]

BILLINGTON, George (1601-38/9)

A Plasterer who was baptized on 7 November 1601, son of Christopher and Sara, at Nassington, Northamptonshire.[72] On 23 May 1619 he was presented as an apprentice by Edward Stanyan for 8 years, when his father was recorded as a husbandman. He was made free and paid his abling fee on 14 April 1627. Arrearage of quarterage was paid in 1628, 1631 and 1638 but payment was made on 23 April 1639 by Widow Billington. His beadleship fine had been paid on April 23 1629 and on 11 May that year he was admitted to the Livery, making a gift of £3 to the Company, in addition to the payment for his livery pattern, and signing his own name. A further gift of £2 was made on 21 July 1631 towards the Company’s building works. On 23 April 1632 he enrolled Andrew Trumball, son of a Scottish gentleman, as his apprentice for 7 years. (He was freed 7 November 1639.) Fines for absence and for ‘attending the Lord Mayor in an unseemly manner without a ruff’ were imposed on 3 May 1633.

BINGHAM, Edward (fl. 1622-1634)

A Plasterer, the son of Thomas Bingham of Horsley, Derbyshire, a yeoman, who was apprenticed to Edward Robinson for 8 years on 11 March 1613/14. He was freed on 29 March 1622 and is listed in the Yeomanry from 1621-33. He was still paying quarterage on 4 September 1634.

BIRD (BERD, BYRDE), Thomas (fl. 1566-1576)

A plasterer paid for work for the Skinners’ Company in 1566-7[73] and for the Brewers’ Company in 1568-9 and 1576.[74] He was employed in the Royal Works at Greenwich for 20 days in June and July 1569, where he was one of the team plastering and blacking the tennis play and plastering and whiting various lodgings at 12d per day.[75]

BLACK, John (d. 1559)

A plasterer buried at St Stephen Coleman Street on 11 December 1559.[76]

BLACKSHAW, William (fl. 1620; d. 1654)

For much of his working life Blackshaw worked independently of the London Company. He was one of James Leigh’s team working at Chelsea House c1620[77] and among the London craftsmen employed at Donibristle House in Scotland for the Earl of Moray in 1644.[78] On 26 June 1646 the Company decided to admit Blackshaw, who had been apprenticed to James Leigh, the late Royal Master Plasterer, who was not a Company member and did not therefore enjoy the freedom of the City. Blackshaw was accepted ‘because he is an approved artist’ who had demonstrated his skill by ‘setting up and making the kings stature in the Hall’ and in view of his poverty this was accepted in lieu of his fine. On 7 May 1652 he took John Steene, son of a Staffordshire carpenter, as his apprentice for 7 years but on 25 July 1654 Widow Blackshaw received charity from the Company as her ‘husband lately broke his necke.’

BLEWETT (BLUATE, BLUETT, BLEWETTE), Morgan (fl. 1610; d. 1666)

On 23 April 1604 Blewett, son of a Middlesex yeoman, was apprenticed to Henry Willis for 8 years. He was freed in June 1611 and listed in the Yeomanry from 1610. He refused beadleship in August 1612 and never rose beyond the Yeomanry, although he paid the fine for whifflership on 15 February 1637/8. He married Sarah Ranger at St Botolph without Bishopsgate on 19 September 1613.[79] He was resident in St Giles Cripplegate and was subsequently recorded in the parish register at the baptism of: Morgan (19 January 1620), Helen (18 January 1621) and at the burials of Morgan (20 January 1620) and his daughter Helen (8 September 1625).[80] On 25 July 1627 he married Catherine Chanceler at his parish church. She was buried on 29 January 1627/8. Morgan Blewitt ‘a pentioner’ was buried on 1 September 1666. Blewett was unable to sign his name and put his mark to a Company memorandum on 23 February 1616/7. He paid a fine for failing to serve one year as a journeyman before presenting his first apprentice, John Hagan, on 29 August 1617, whom he failed to enrol in 1625 and was fined again on 12 August of that year. His apprentice, Richard Peirce (26 July 1630) did not obtain his freedom. Richard Hills III was turned over to him from John Batchellor (27 May 1636) and on 3 August 1646 he presented Mathias (aka Nicholas) Alwinckle as an apprentice on behalf of Mary, widow of John Dodsley.

He is recorded working as a partner of Kelham Roades at the Charterhouse for 3 days in June-July 1614;[81] as a member of James Leigh’s team working at Chelsea House (?) for  Lionel Cranfield, Earl of Middlesex, in 1623;[82] under Henry Chippinge at Mr Ashley’s chamber in Middle Temple in 1645;[83] and at St James’s Palace in 1660.[84] Blewett does not seem to have prospered and was frequently behind with his quarterage payments in the 1630s and 40s. On 3 April 1646 he was admitted a pensioner as ‘a poore member of this Company’ and on 23 June 1654 the Company additionally ordered that he ‘shalbe presented … to the Co. of Marchantaylors for a pensioner …’ The last recorded payment to him as a pensioner was made on 23 April 1658.

BLINKHORNE (BLINCKARNE, BLINCKHORN, BLINCKHORNE, BLINCKORNE, BLYNCKAM,), John (b. c 1586; d. 1611)

Although he was apprenticed to Thomas Johnson I for 8 years on 28 April 1600, Blinkhorne married while he still had 3 years left to serve and was accordingly discharged by the Company. However, at the request of Sir Thomas Smyth, he was put under the care of Mr Capp for the remainder of his term, paying him 8d per week, while he continued with his own work. Blinkhorne must have been precociously skilled to obtain special treatment but in 1607 he was again in trouble with the Company. After investigation by the Court of Aldermen it was recorded on 25 January 1607/8 that he should be disenfranchised because he had failed to complete his apprenticeship and meanwhile obtained his freedom by patrimony with the Ironmongers’ Company (he was the son of ‘Phillip Blinckarne, Iremonger’). However, he was fined for ill work by the Plasterers’ Company on 28 July 1609, paid his fine for beadleship on 21 August of that year and continued to be listed in the Quarterage Accounts until 1611.

BOLLAND (BOLAND, BOWLAND, BOWLER), Nicholas (fl. 1591-1604)

A Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street, who served his apprenticeship under Ralph Bettes, who presented him on 13 October 1579. He paid his abling fine on 13 October 1587 and his beadleship fine on 30 August 1588. On 29 January 1590/1 he and Randall Clarkson were fined  for bad work at the upper end of Grub Street. On 11 November of the same year he was fined again for bad work, this time with Thomas Oldham, in Paul’s Churchyard. He was fined for keeping a boy for more than six months on 4 November 1592 and then enrolled William Hill. Other apprentices did not complete their terms: William Pynson, was presented on 8 May 1601; Reignold Ward on 18 February 1601/2; and Robert Thomas Tompkins on 24 June 1602. Fines were levied on Bolland for ill work, unspecified, on 6 July 1593; in Mark Lane on 21 November 1595; in Bishopsgate Street on 21 April 1598 (by his man); and in Little Wood Street on 3 November 1601. He was remembered in 1599 in the will of his old master, Ralph Bettes, and was one of the four ex-apprentices who was to receive 3s 4d for carrying his body to the burial.[85] Bolland was recorded in the parish registers of St Stephen Coleman Street at the baptism of Susana (2 May 1596) and Nicholas (7 September 1604).[86]

BOLTON, ?William (fl. 1586-87)

A plasterer paid for work by the church of St Dunstan in the West in 1586-87.[87] Probably the William Bolton who was assessed at £3 in 1582 in the parish of St Dunstan.[88]

BOND, William (fl. 1623; d. 1624)

A Plasterer, son of a Herefordshire husbandman, who was presented as an apprentice for 7 years by Edmund Lake on 31 October 1615. He was made free and paid his abling fine on 8 May 1623 and his beadleship fine on 8 August 1624. In that year his name was crossed through in the Quarterage Accounts.

BOOTH, John (fl. 1607)

One of the plasterers paid for work by the Merchant Taylors’ Company in 1607.[89] Possibly the John Booth who was assessed at £6 in 1582 in the parish of St Botolph without Aldersgate.[90]

BOOTHOUSE (BOOTHEHOWSE), John (fl. 1613; d. 1622/3)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Anthony Sharpe on 4 August 1606 and gained his freedom on 13 April 1613 (having apparently been turned over to William Pritchard). He paid his beadleship fine on 14 June 1615 and remained in the Yeomanry until his death. On 25 July 1618 he was fined for bad work in Phillip Lane. He paid a fine in lieu of serving his year as a journeyman on 5 May 1620 and took John Robinson as his apprentice for 9 years; but surrendered the indenture on 28 November 1622 as Robinson ‘had departed from him’. Adminstration of his estate, valued at £24 18s 6d, was granted to his widow, Margaret, living in the parish of St Alphage near Cripplegate, on 21 May 1623.[91] Widow Boothouse was listed in the Quarterage Accounts in 1622-23 but her name was crossed through in 1624.

BORDE, John (fl. 1581; d. before 1605)

A Plasterer who obtained his freedom on 26 May 1581, having been apprenticed to Thomas Moore the Elder.

BOTTOM (BOTHOM, BOTTAM), William (fl. 1569; d. 1592)

A Plasterer who was admitted to the Company on 2 November 1571. He was fined on 27 March 1573 for taking another man’s work and on 30 April 1574 for taking work from Mr Ratcliffe. Despite this misdemeanour (and ‘coming to the Hall in his cloak’ on 4 February 1575 and abusing the Master and Company on 25 March 1586) he continued in the Livery and was subsequently elected Junior Warden for 1578-9, Senior Warden for 1587-8 and Master for 1591-2. Fines for bad work by him or his apprentice were levied on several occasions: [23] June & 23 November 1576 (Ely House), 5 February 1580 (with Thomas Flood), 10 December 1581, 31 May 1583 (in the Barbican), 12 February 1585 (‘in the frame within Newgate next the Hospitall gate’), 25 March 1586 (in Bartholomew Lane), 18 June 1590 (Chancery Lane). On 27 June 1589 he was paid by the Company for ‘arrestinge of a Plasterer beinge a forrein and for byndinge him from worke’. Bottom’s apprentices were numerous, although not all completed their terms: Francis Frebodye (13 October 1576); Peter Sarsson (freed 15 February 1577); Valentyne Archer (5 February 1580), Richard Webster (24 June 1580); Francis Broadbent (returned to him from John Bull on 4 August 1581); Laurence England (7 November 1583); Richard Stevenson (turned over to him from Ellis Harrison on 13 October 1588); Darbie Moore (20 December 1588); William Nicholls (6 November 1590).

Bottom was regularly employed by the Drapers' Company and was referred to as ‘our playsterar’ in the Renter’s Accounts.[92] In 1578-9 he carried out routine work on the ‘old Drapers’ Hall’ and, with the help of three labourers who were employed ‘in grinding and making ready of Colours’, he decorated the newly completed timber structure ‘called portalles’ in the hall’s garden, for which he received 7s 7d. Within the Hall he led the team of six men who were whitewashing the ‘Seeling of the Ladies Chamber, the great chamber within that, the gallery, under the great gate’, around windows and stairs; and colouring the windows of the hall with ‘leade Coulour’. Bottom himself, Richard Brigges, John Billing and Raphe the plasterer were paid 16d per day, while Thomas Johnson’s man and Bothom’s man, Peter Rossendale, received 14d and 12d respectively.[93] In 1582-83 Bottom headed a team of similar size: William Piggen, Francis ‘Bothoms man’ [presumably Broadbent], Richard Webster, Robert Brigges, Richard ‘Bothoms man’ and ‘Bothoms prentice’. They were employed ‘in and vppon the new howse in the Garden’ of Drapers’ Hall, grinding colours, rough casting and plastering, ‘seeling’ with lime and hair, costing £2 5s 11d.[94] The last mention of Bottom working for the Drapers occurred in 1585-86, when he supplied hair and he and his boy were plastering and rendering the inner walls of the Gunpowder Room. The total of 7s 7d also covered the cost of a labourer to clean up after them.[95]

As a resident of the parish of St Stephen Coleman Street he was assessed in the lay subsidies at £3 in 1577 and 1582.[96] He married Elizabeth Rigsby at his parish church on 11 September 1569 and was recorded in the parish registers at the baptisms of Anne (5 March 1569/70); Richard (26 May 1572); Robert (8 August 1574); William (14 September 1576); and Anne (2 March 1582/3) and the burials of William (1 November 1578); Robert (10 December 1578); Anne (31 July 1584) and Samuel (21 April 1586). Bottom made his will during his final illness on 19 September 1592.[97] He wished that ‘all my worcking tooles and skaffoldings belonginge to myne occupacon’ should be shared equally between his two apprentices, Derby Moore and William Nicholls, once they finished their apprenticeship and with the proviso that they served his wife faithfully during that time. Bottom left 20s. to his maidservant Anne Adams, and to Anne Broadbank [Broadbent] and Elizabeth Sheriff, which they were to have when they reached the age of seventeen. He also stated that Robert Lane and Thomas Buckley, the tenants of two properties in St Stephen Coleman Street, should be given first refusal when they came to renew their rent, and this should be offered to them at a favourable price. He asked that his wife make gifts of his wearing apparel to his fellow plasterers, Edward Broadbent, Francis Broadbent, and Richard Webster. He donated 20s. to the Master, Wardens and Livery of the Plasterers’ Company for them to accompany his body to his funeral. The rest of his goods and chattels were left to his wife Elizabeth, who was named executrix. The will was witnessed by William Taylor, Thomas Paskyner, Blasé Gratwood and Thomas Buckley. William Bottom was buried on 23 September 1592 and probate was granted on 5 October 1592.[98]

BOWDELLE (BOYDELLE), Robert (fl. 1531-54)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Thomas Luce in 1525.[99] Bowdelle was employed in the Royal Works between 1531 and 1544 at numerous sites, not only in London but also in Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Hertfordshire and Kent, indicative of the distances that plasterers had to travel when working for the Crown. He was one of numerous plasterers recruited for routine work receiving 7d per day, until 1536 when his rate of pay was increased to 8d daily. This implies that he was junior to William Bowdelle who was earning 8d per day throughout this period. His name is first recorded at the Palace of Westminster (October-November 1531, 26 days 3 hours)[100] and again the following year when preparations were in hand for the queen’s coronation.[101] He travelled to Windsor Castle in 1533, Richmond Palace and the Tower of London in 1536 and 1539, Ampthill in 1536-7 and Oatlands in 1537.[102] Greenwich Palace required frequent attention from the plasterers and Bowdelle was there sporadically in 1533, 1535-6 and 1536-7.[103] Over the period from December 1539-August 1540 Bowdelle worked intermittently for 18 days, earning 12s 8d; but this must have necessitated a good deal of travel between the City and Greenwich.[104] A similar work pattern was maintained at The More, Hertfordshire, where Bowdelle was working in 1537, 1539 and 1541-2.[105] Such was the demand for speed at Oatlands in 1537 that day-time working in the chapel, closet, lodgings and elsewhere had to be supplemented by the plasterers working nights ‘for the hasty Expedecion of same’.[106] In 1542-3 he was back at Westminster.[107] Between October 1539 and 1544 he made several journeys to Kent where work was required at Canterbury, Rochester and Dartford.[108] By 1544 he was earning 10d per day and after working there for a more concentrated spell of 23 days in January and February he took home 18s.[109] In 1547 Sir John Thynne’s steward reported from Longleat about the plasterer that ‘as for boydell him selfe we take him to be at London’but this could have referred to either Robert or William Bowdelle.[110] In 1550 he was serving as Senior Warden of the Company when he was one of the witnesses to the admission to the Freedom of the City of two apprentices: Thomas Batley and A. N. Other [name illegible in the MS].[111] On 27 August 1554 the Court of Aldermen received a report on the matters in dispute between English and Irish members of the Plasterers’ Company. The Company was ordered to hold elections that represented the Irish as well as the English members. Richard Bellowes, William and Robert Bowdelle reported back on 22 October 1554 that the election had been held according to the order and that the Senior Warden, Oliver Thomas, was English and the Junior Warden, Simon Betaugh, was Irish.[112]

BOWDELLE (BAWDELL, BAWDLE, BODELL, BODWELL, BOWDWELL, BOYDELLE, BOYNEY), William (fl. 1532; d. 1559)

One of the more senior Plasterers receiving 8d per day when working in the Royal Works on routine plastering at Greenwich (between November 1532 and April 1533 and between September and November 1535); Windsor Castle (between June and August 1535); Westminster (1532-3); [113]  Richmond (July and August 1536).[114] He was twice employed at Ampthill (July - August 1536 and October - November 1543). [115] He served as Senior Warden of the Company in 1545-6.[116] In 1547 Sir John Thynne’s steward reported from Longleat about the plasterer that ‘as for boydell him selfe we take him to be at London’ but this may have been Robert Bowdelle rather than William.[117] On 27 August 1554 the Court of Aldermen received a report on the matters in dispute between English and Irish members of the Plasterers’ Company. The Company was ordered to hold elections that represented the Irish as well as the English members. Richard Bellowes, William and Robert Bowdelle reported back on 22 October 1554 that the election had been held according to the order and that the Senior Warden, Oliver Thomas, was English and the Junior Warden, Simon Betaugh, was Irish.[118] On 29 October William further reported to the Court of Aldermen that Patrick Kellie would not deliver up the key belonging to the Company and it was decided that he would be sent to ‘ward’ if he continued to refuse to do so.[119] He was buried at St Stephen Coleman Street on 26 March 1559.[120]

BOWE, Robert (fl. 1614; d. 1624)

A Plasterer apprenticed to George Mason on 25 April 1606 who gained his freedom on 25 March 1614. He paid his quarterage arrears on 12 March 1623/4 as a member of the Yeomanry. Although he had not served his year as a journeyman, a memorandum of 26 July 1624 allowed him to take as his apprentice his son-in-law, John Hays, as he had not taken an apprentice for 10 years and ‘was in poverty’. He died in 1624.

BOWES, Thomas (fl. 1598-1602)

A Plasterer who was the Beadle of the Company in 1602, receiving a salary of 20s a quarter. On 11 May 1598 he had been authorised (together with Mr Hinde) to sue anyone working as a plasterer who had not been apprenticed to the trade.

BOWES (BOUGH, BOWLES), William (fl. 1613-43)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Matthew Barrett on 26 April 1611 and turned over to John Slarett on 25 March 1614. Bowes was one of the team of plasterers paid for work by the Merchant Taylors’ Company in 1607, while still an apprentice.[121] He was one of those working at the Charterhouse for 17 days between 18 July and 11 September in 1614.[122] His freedom is not recorded but he is listed among the Yeomanry from 1613-33. He paid his beadleship fine on 11 May 1629. On 15 June 1632 he promised to pay 20s arrears in the next quarter, which he did on 29 November. He was fined for absence on 2 December 1628 and 9 February 1642/3. He paid arrears of quarterage intermittently from 4 September 1623 until 25 July 1643.

BOYCE (BOYSE), Zachery (fl. 1602; d. 1624)

Although apprenticed to John Hart on 6 November 1590 his freedom was not recorded and his name does not appear in the Quarterage Lists. He was listed as a labourer at the time of his death. Nevertheless he was listed as a plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate in the parish registers which record his marriage to Anne Legingham (23 January 1602/3); her burial (28 July 1603); his marriage, as a widower to Jane Beale (26 September 1603) and the baptism of Joseph on 4 March 1603/4. Zachery Boyce ‘laborer’ was buried on 31 August 1624.[123]

BOYFIELD, John (fl. 1609)

A plasterer of St Olave Southwark, recorded in the parish registers at the baptism of his daughter Alice, on 24 April 1609.[124]

BOYLAND, James (fl. 1574)

A Plasterer made free of the London Company on 29 January 1573/4.

BRACKLEY (BANKLYFFE, BRACKLEY, BRACKLYF, BRACKNELL, BROCKLEY), Edward (fl. 1607; d. 1610)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Edmund Essex on 1 February 1593 and turned over to Thomas Johnson on 25 July 1595, to John Hinde on 28 April 1596 and to William Piggen on 14 August 1598. His freedom is recorded on 28 November 1605 and he donated a silver spoon to the Company in August 1606. He was listed in the Yeomanry of the Company from 1605-10. He was paid at the rate of 2s.per day by the Merchant Taylors’ Company in 1607.[125]

BRECKSON (BRAXTON, BREXON, BRICKSON), William (fl. 1621-58)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Robert Widmore on 23 April 1612. He gained his freedom on 2 May 1621 and remained in the Yeomanry until at least 1638 when he was paying his quarterage dues in arrears (30 April 1638). He received a pension from the Company on 25 July 1657 and again on 23 April 1658.

BRICKBY (BRECKBY), Edmond/Edward (fl. 1542-71)

A Plasterer who was recorded working in the Royal Works at Dartford, repairing partitions in the King’s Closet in May 1542[126] and plastering the exterior of lodgings in January 1543/4.[127] In 1571 he presented Raffe Thompson as his apprentice.

BRICKNELL (BRIGNALL), Stephen (fl. 1603-41)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Robert Priestman on 12 September 1594 and freed on 19 May 1603, when he was also fined ‘for not being enrolled’. While still an apprentice he worked alongside Priestman and others for the Clothworkers’ Company on ‘the newe building of the parlour’ in October & November 1594 and April 1595, receiving 10d per day for a total of 18 ½ days.[128] On Court Day in August 1606 he presented a silver spoon to the Company. He was fined for lateness on 13 October 1612 and for bad work (with Percival Godbeheare) on 29 April 1613. He remained in the Yeomanry until at least 1633 and took numerous apprentices: on 10 May 1609 he presented George Hill but on 29 January 1612/3 he was fined for not enrolling his apprentice; his next apprentice was Richard James who was presented on 13 October 1617 and a fine for failure to enrol him was levied on 26 November 1624; on 22 May 1626 Thomas Jennings was apprenticed to him and he was fined for taking work ‘of a Bricklayer’; William Lyne apprenticed himself on 25 July 1638; Baptist, son of the plasterer Robert Woodroofe, apprenticed himself on 23 April 1639; Thomas Baines was apprenticed to him on 4 February 1639/40 (and freed 8 August 1648). He was in receipt of charity from the Company on 13 October 1640 and was one of the Plasterers in receipt of a donation from ‘the gift of Benson’ on 26 July 1641.

BRIGGES, Henry (b. c 1561; d. 1629)

A Plasterer of the Liberty of St Mary Axe in St Andrew Undershaft, he was recorded in the parish records of St Andrew Undershaft at the baptisms of William (14 June 1590); Thomas (13 October 1591); Alice (27 May 1594); Henry (2 March 1599/1600); Thomas (2 June 1602); William (22 February 1606); and at the burial of William (23 June 1590) and Alice (30 May 1594).[129] He was apprenticed to Thomas Warbishe on 19 August 1580, freed on 30 August 1588 and paid his beadleship fine on 7 September 1589. In 1594 he was elected to the Livery, served as Junior Warden 1604-5 and May-September 1610 (on the death of the incumbent), as Senior Warden 1610-11 and Master 1620-21.

Brigges presented an unnamed apprentice on 27 July 1593, when he was also fined for ill work. Numerous fines for ill work or disobedience to Company ordinances followed: ‘for taking work by great and not by the yard, …, at the Castle in Cornhill and at the Postern’ (5 May 1599); by St Andrews Church, Eastcheap (10 September 1599); at The Swan, Tower Street (3 September 1601); in Dukes Place (3 November 1601); at St Thomas the Apostle (2 November 1604 and 6 November 1605); at ‘The Three Cranes’, Thames Street (25 April 1606); for absence (8 March 1603/4 and 24 August 1612) and for bad work in Bedlam (1 August 1616). The following apprentices were presented by him: Thomas Hippie (6 February 1600/1); Anthony Burton (25 April 1605); Rowland Welche (8 June 1608); William Burt (10 May 1609); William Downham (12 May 1613); Bartholomew Goldsborough (2 December 1614); Richard Newman was turned over to him from Mr Langford (2 May 1621) and his previously unrecorded apprentice, James Goodall, was turned over to Warden [William] Whiting (5 February 1622). On 25 October 1621 Mr [Henry] Briggs, Mr [Richard] Slater & Mr [William] Widmore (the previous Master and Wardens) were called upon to pay 9s 4d which was lost from the Company’s funds during their tenure of office through receipt of ‘light gould’, which was deemed ‘an insufficient answere and excuse’.

Brigges appears to have succeeded William Bottom as the official plasterer to the Drapers’ Company following the latter’s death in 1592. In 1594-95 he was paid £22 8s for his labour and £20 10s for materials by the Drapers for work on two newly-built houses near the Dutch Church.[130] He received 19s 10d for whiting the hall on ‘the oute syde and in the Garden’ in 1606-7.[131] He was employed in the Royal Works at Greenwich on routine plastering in lodgings in 1609-10.[132] In 1594 Briggs was one of a number of plasterers accused of intermeddling by the Painter-Stainers’ Company in their complaint to Star Chamber.[133] He was witness in a lawsuit (unrelated to plastering), aged 49, on 13 November 1610.[134] Briggs made a nuncupative will on 5 March 1628/9, in which he recorded his wish that all of his estate should pass to his wife.[135] Henry Briggs ‘householder’ was buried 7 March 1628/9. Probate was granted to his widow Alice on 19 March 1628/9.[136] She made her nuncupative will on 20 March 1629/30, bequeathing a brass pot to her cousin Francis Smith, a quart pot to John Pynninger, and a little brass pot to Anne Scarret. Mary Johnson, who had cared for her during her final sickness was left a gown. The remainder of her estate was bequeathed to her cousin Mary Williamet. Probate was granted on 1 April 1630.[137]

BRIGGES (BRIGES) James (b. 1570; d. 1591)

The son of Richard Brigges, who died in 1591 at the age of 21, not having claimed freedom of the Company by patrimony. His will was of significance to the Company as he left them ‘The Three Tuns’ and his corner messuage in St Albans; and a lease of this property was let to William Piggen on favourable terms on 27 June 1591.[138] This bequest subsequently gave rise to a dispute and the Company paid for a copy of the will on 14 October 1605 and an ‘Amplificacon’ in the Prerogative Court on 25 January 1608/9. An assessment was made to raise money in order to cover the costs of the lawsuit in Chancery against Barton on 2 February 1608/9. Piggen also received a bequest of £3. The will is of particular interest as some of the bequests elucidate the interlocking relationships that existed between plasterers: his father, Richard, was brother to William Brigges, who was one of the executors of the will and jointly inherited ‘The Christopher’, in the parish of St Albans, with John Hopper, whose apprentices included Thomas Johnson II. William Brigges’s two daughters both married plasterers: Francis Broadbank and Thomas Johnson I, who had been an apprentice of Robert Sheppard. Sheppard’s apprentices also included William Piggen, who was turned over to Richard Brigges, the master of Ellis Piggen. Edmond Essex was paid £1 to act as overseer of the will.

BRIGGES (BRIGES), Richard (fl. 1563; d. 1588)

A Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street, assessed as a householder at £4 in 1577[139] and at £5 in 1582.[140] The parish registers record the baptisms of: Thomas (20 March 1563); James (29 May 1570); and the burial of Thomas (16 March 1572/3). Richard Brigges was buried at his parish church on 25 April 1588. He spent 28 days in March-April 1566 at Fotheringhay Castle, plastering the gable ends of the great chamber, the kitchen and making partitions.[141] At some point in 1567-9 he spent 10 days whiting and plastering at Enfield Palace and 4 days at Hatfield.[142] In 1575-76 Brigges, Ralph Bettes and Thomas Browne were subcontracted by the Bricklayer John Taylor to work at the old house of the Dowager Lady Sheffield at Blackfriars and its new extension.[143] He worked for 5 days at 16d per day at the Drapers’ Hall as one of the team led by William Bottom in 1578-9.[144] In 1580-81 he was one of four plasterers employed by the Clothworkers’ Company at ‘the newe howse in Flete lane’, receiving 27s 4d for 21 ½ days work at 16d per day.[145] Brigges was one of the Plasterers unable to sign his name, putting his mark (a cross in a circle) to Company memoranda (e.g. 25 March 1586).

Brigges’ career within the Company was somewhat chequered. On 14 July 1574 he paid a fine ‘for his coming agayne into the lyverie’ and served as Junior Warden in 1576-7 and Senior Warden in 1581-2. Despite his seniority he was fined for ‘coming to Hall in his cloak (4 February 1574/5); for bad work (19 June 1579, 14 December 1582); for taking work of a bricklayer in More Lane (20 November 1579); for unlawful work in Holborn and Smithfield (with William Brigges, his brother, 29 July 1586). His numerous apprentices included: unnamed (1571), Nicholas Boys (14 March 1575/6), Ellis Piggen (1576), unnamed (26 April 1577), unnamed (27 February 1578/9), William Rawlins (12 August 1585), James Warren (turned over from Richard Barfield, 10 March 1586/7), William Potter (20 May 1587). He was involved in disputes with other members of the Company: John Hopper was fined for ‘supplanting of Richard Briggs his Customer’ (21 October 1575); and fell out with his brother William to the extent that senior members of the Company were appointed to arbitrate between them (31 January 1583/4). In 1588 he was sued by Richard Wright, a citizen and Clothworker, who accused Brigges of ‘beinge a very subtile fellow’ who had fraudulently obtained from him a claim to the manor of Dudnall Grange in Essex.[146] The property in Wood Street, adjacent to Company Hall, originally donated to the Company by Robert Sheppard in 1556, was ‘demised’ by Richard Brigges on 30 September 1583 (and again by William Brigges on 18 October 1595).[147] Brigges appears to have owned another property in Wood Street which had been let to John Ashby, a dyer and one of the executors of James Brigges’ will. This gave rise to litigation in 1592 when Richard Shawe, who had married Brigges’ widow Elizabeth in 1590, was unable to regain possession of the indenture from Ashby.[148]

BRIGGES, Robert (fl. 1582-3)

A plasterer named as one of the team working with William Bottom at Drapers’ Hall in 1582-3.[149]

BRIGGES (BRIGES, BRIGGS), Thomas (fl. 1569-81)

A Plasterer who was subjected to an unspecified offence committed by William Barr (8 August 1573) and who was fined for disobedience on 30 April 1574. He made a contribution to the cost of the bill that the Company hoped to bring before Parliament ‘tuching artificers’ (Court Day, March 1580/1). He was employed by the Royal Works for 58 days at 12d per day at Eltham Palace between May and July 1569.[150]

[This name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts so it is unlikely that he is the plasterer paid for work by the Merchant Taylors’ Company in 1607.[151] The latter is more likely to have been an apprentice of one of the plasterers working there, who did not become free of the Company.]

BRIGGES (BRIGGS, BRYDGES), William (fl. 1561; d. 1596)

A Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street, brother of Richard Brigges. He was recorded in the parish registers at the baptism of his daughter Elizabeth on 25 July 1561. William Brigges ‘plasterer’ was buried on 23 November 1596 at St Stephen Coleman Street.[152] He was Junior Warden of the Company in 1576-7 but declined election again on 11 September 1582. A Company memorandum of 30 August 1583 agreed that Brigges would be excused duty as an Assistant ‘untill it shall please god to make hym better able and then to be receved againe’, which suggests that he was unwell or at least unable to work at that date. A dispute with his brother Richard was referred to arbitration on 31 January 1583/4. It seems to have been resolved as they were jointly fined for unlawful work in Holborn and Smithfield on 29 July 1586. The Company made a payment ‘to his solecs’ on 25 March 1586 as he was then in prison. He paid off an unspecified debt on 2 July 1596. He does not seem to have taken many apprentices: on 8 November 1577 he paid for the return of Henry Cheshire, the apprentice of John Bettes; he presented Thomas Fern (25 July 1582) and William Cusbye (13 October 1596). He was one of the plasterers working on the hall at Lincoln’s Inn in 1567-8.[153] In the will of James Brigges, his nephew, he was (jointly with John Hopper) bequeathed tenements called ‘The Christopher’ in St Alban Wood Street, rented by a Tallowchandler named Adams. He and John Ashby were nominated as joint executors of the will in 1591. His widow was still alive in 1629, when it was agreed by the Company on 2 June to pay her a quarterly benevolence, in view of her poverty.

BRISTOW, Robert (fl. 1579; d. before 1605)

A Plasterer who paid to take over the apprentice Robert Priestman from Widow Moncas on 30 March 1579.

BROADBENT (BRODBANKE, BROD(E)BENT, BROKBANK, BURDBENT), Edward/Edmond (fl. 1576; d. before 1605)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 15 February 1576/7 and was due to complete his journeyman’s year on 1 May 1577. His beadleship fine was paid on 25 July 1578 and he contributed to the Company fund to pay for a Parliamentary bill ‘tuching artificers’ on Court Day, March 1580/1. He presented an unnamed apprentice on 2 September 1586 and Roger Metcalf on 11 May 1588. Like his brother, Francis Broadbent, and Richard Webster he was a beneficiary under the will of William Bottom (probably his ex-master) receiving items of wearing apparel in 1592.[154]

BROADBENT (BRODBANK, BRODBENT, BRODEBENT), Francis (fl. 1584; d. 1615)

A Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street and St Giles Cripplegate. He married Margaret Briggs, daughter of William Brigges on 6 September 1584 at St Stephen Coleman Street. The parish registers of St Stephen Coleman Street record the burials of his children Anne (30 March 1587); Elizabeth (19 March 1587/8); Anne (16 July 1589); Anne (1 February 1592/3); Joane (2 February 1594/5) and Mary (1 June 1598).[155] The parish registers of St Giles Cripplegate record the baptism of a son Griffin (15 June 1600) and the burials of Griffin (8 August 1600) and Margery (19 August 1600). Francis Broadbent was buried at St Giles on 16 September 1615. A widow, Margaret Broadbent, was buried in the same parish on 26 August 1619.[156] He was presented by John Bull on 18 November 1575 but was later turned over to Henry Bettes (8 November 1577) and on 4 August 1581 William Bottom paid for the return of his apprentice Brodebent from John Bull. He was freed on 25 January 1584 when he paid his abling fine and made a donation to the poor. While still an apprentice ‘Francis, bothome’s man’ worked with Bottom for the Drapers’ Company in 1582-3.[157] On 25 March 1586 John Atkinson was paid for serving as Company Beadle in place of Francis Broadbent. An Officer was paid by the Company ‘for carrying Frauncis Brodbent to prison’, for an unspecified offence, on 20 May 1587. There must have been a reconciliation as Francis and his wife, Margaret, were granted an annuity from the rents of the Company’s Wood Street tenement on 29 June 1604.[158] Thereafter he presented apprentices: Thomas Broadbent (7 September 1605); Thomas Dallowhood (30 June 1608); John Walter (30 April 1610). In 1592 he (together with his brother, Edward Broadbent, and Richard Webster) was bequeathed items of clothing by William Bottom, his ex-master. His name is listed in the Yeomanry until his death in 1615.

BROADBENT (BRODBENT), Thomas (fl. 1607; d. 1612)

A Plasterer who was presented by Francis Broadbent on 7 September 1605, who does not appear to have been his father but to whom he may have been related. There is no record of his freedom but his name appears in the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts from 1607-11. He was buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 16 May 1612.[159]

BROCK, Rowland (fl. 1630; d. after 1655)

A Plasterer, son of a Gloucestershire weaver, who apprenticed himself to Robert Whiting on 8 May 1623 and was made free on 2 July 1630. He paid his beadleship fine on 10 August 1632. The following were apprenticed to him: William Done (4 August 1637); an apprentice of John Walter was turned over to him (20 February 1643/4); Robert Foster (27 June 1645); Daniel Grimes (29 November 1653). A payment was made on 5 May 1648 ‘for reading Brocks declaracon’ but no details of the substance of this document were given. On 24 April 1654 he received payment as a Company pensioner and his name last appears in the Company records on 21 September 1655 when Nathaniel Wellins engaged to pay 10s on behalf of Brock.

BROOKE (BROOKES), Edward (fl. 1601; d. 1640)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, recorded in the parish register at the baptism of a daughter Mary on 8 July 1604.[160] Brooke was apprenticed to Richard Johnson (24 July 1594) but freed by Mr [John] Hinde on 1 August 1601 and paid his beadleship fine on 4 August 1606. He remained in the Yeomanry until at least 1633. Meanwhile he had been committed to the Compter by the Company (25 July 1605) and was sent there again in connection with evil work (24 August 1612), and the following year was committed and taken before the Lord Mayor (12 May 1613). He was fined for bad work at Bunn Hill and at my Lord Petre’s (26 August 1614) and was issued with a warning on 25 July 1622. He presented two apprentices: George Lacenwell (8 June 1608) and Edward Grigg (27 October 1611). The latter worked with Brooke for part of the time that his master spent at The Charterhouse, where Brooke received 2s per day for 64½ days between August and November 1613 and 49½ days between March and November 1614. At the end of this period Brooke received a payment of 6s for stopping with lime and hair ‘the chamber of the Pantler to the Schollers’ and with colouring the posts and windows.[161] In his will, made on 23 March 1639/40 and proved on 13 April of that year, Brooke left bequests totalling £15, including 12d to each of his three brothers and their children but £9 to his grandchild, Grace Harrison, for her education. His only son, Joshua, having died, his wife Margaret was appointed executrix, inheriting properties in East Greenwich, Kent and Doddington, Northamptonshire. Nothing was left to fellow plasterers.[162]

BROOKE, William (fl. 1584; d. before 1605)

A Plasterer presented by Mr [Thomas] Kellie on 17 February 1575/6 and freed on 23 April 1584.

BROWNE, John (fl. 1607?)

Thomas Casey I presented Browne, the son of a Suffolk woodmonger, on 25 July 1599 as his apprentice for 7 years. Casey died in 1603 leaving £1 to Browne, his apprentice. There is no record of his freedom nor does his name appear in the Quarterage Accounts.

[He may be the John Browne who was paid for taskwork at St James’s Palace (1607-9), when he supplied lime and hair and workmanship in various lodgings and outbuildings; but as his name appears only once in the Royal Works it is more probable that this was clerkly error for Richard Browne.]

BROWNE, Patrick (fl. 1577; d. 1599)

A Plasterer resident in the parish of St James Garlickhythe when his daughter Alice was baptised on 24 October 1596 and at the time of his death. On 25 July 1577 Pathericke [sic] Browne completed his apprenticeship. The spelling of his name strongly suggests that he was one of the many Irish plasterers who belonged to the Company in the 16th century. He paid his abling and admission fines on 15 August 1577 and was selected for the Livery on 31 July 1590. He served as Junior Warden 1596-7 and acted as deputy in this role to Richard Browne on 2 August 1599. He was fined for ill work in the ‘mason kyrwyn worke’ (16 November 1582) and at ‘The Horse’s Head’, Watling Street (5 March 1588). His apprentices were: Richard Morland (25 July 1582), John Duffeild (24 April 1591), William Pitcher (23 November 1593) and an anonymous apprentice (3 September 1597). In his nuncupative will of 20 August 1599 Browne left all of his small estate to his wife, Elizabeth, named as executrix, for the care of their three children. Patrick Browne ‘househoulder’ was buried at his parish church on 30 August 1599 and probate was granted on 5 September.[163] Administration of the will was transferred from Elizabeth, deceased widow of Patrick, to Richard Browne in 1610.[164]

BROWNE, Richard I (c 1553-1633)

A Plasterer, resident of St Bride, who is first recorded paying his beadleship fine on 26 July 1582. He was promoted to the Livery (31 July 1590) and went on to serve as Junior Warden (1598-99), Senior Warden (1601-02) and Master on three occasions (1608-09, 1612-13, 1622-23). He stood unsuccessfully in the election for Master on 13 September 1630. On 21 January 1621/2 he was a witness (aged 68 years or thereabouts and living in the parish of St Pancras near Cheapside) in the Chancery case concerning the estates of Richard Dungan and his wife, Elizabeth.[165]

During his long career Browne presented the following apprentices: Richard Smith (19 August 1586);[166] an anonymous apprentice (25 April 1589); John Goldsmith (6 February 1596); William Marshall (10 November 1598); William Echell II (25 March 1602); William Smith (21 August 1602); Edmund Beck (11 February 1603); Maurice Price (apprentice of Lewis Gennoway turned over to him, 30 January 1607, but left his master on 21 January 1608); William Nicholls II (8 June 1608); John Jackson II (not presented by Browne but turned over from him to his mother, Margery, 3 November 1609); Clement Kelly (not presented but freed 17 July 1614); John Price (apprentice of Lawrence Gennoway turned over to him, 17 July 1614); Richard Yaydon (2 August 1615); Edward Ridgeway (apprentice of Richard Hill turned over to him, 24 April 1622); Gregory King (apprentice of Richard Slater turned over to him, 15 November 1622). His son, Richard Browne II was freed on 5 June 1621. Between January 1626 and August 1628 seven apprentices were presented by Richard Browne but it is not clear whether this was the father or son: Richard Bancock (apprentice of Henry Stanley turned over to him, 25 January 1626); Henry Price (25 April 1626); Ellis Osborne (2 February 1627); Richard Fudge (1 May 1627); John Hall (25 July 1627); John Wastney (30 August 1627); Richard Marshall (1 September 1628). Henry Smith was one of his apprentices (18 August 1628), as was John Wedge (apprentice of Anthony Burton turned over to him, 15 June 1632).

There were numerous fines for misdemeanours: for ‘undress’ (13 October 1582); for evil work by his brother, Thomas Browne, in Chancery Lane (30 August 1583); for evil work in partnership with Edmund Harrison (16 November 1586); for ill work in Cow Lane (10 November 1587), Crutched Friars (11 January 1594), Milk Street (31 January 1595); for lateness (16 January 1596); for absence and ill work in Fleet Street (28 January 1597); on 27 April that year he paid the fine ‘for ill work in Shoe Lane, Fleet Street, without Temple Bar, Chancery Lane, beinge Mr Bettes mans work’; and in Chancery Lane again (9 November 1599); for ill work in Grays Inn Lane, in partnership with Richard Cooke 2 August 1600); a fine for ill work by his apprentice, John Goldsmith, in Drury Lane (10 December 1602); for lateness (8 March 1604); for unspecified evil work (1 February 1604/5); for evil work in Fleet Street (6 November 1605 & 11 September 1606); for evil work in Huggin Lane and Without Aldgate (14 August & 6 November 1607); for absence from a Court meeting (24 August 1612); for wearing his apron on Search Day (15 February 1627/8); for absence (21 June 1631). Browne was extensively employed by the Royal Works on routine plastering: Somerset House and the Mews Stables (1609-10);[167] Whitehall, Westminster and St James’s Palaces and Somerset House (1610-11);[168] Somerset House (1612-13).[169] Unusually, the Company imposed a fine for bad workmanship at Somerset House on 9 January 1611/2.

While Master he contributed 5s towards the costs of the lawsuit in Chancery concerning ‘the corner howse in Woodstreete’ against their opponent, Barton (2 February 1608/9). His financial success enabled him to take out a bond, together with Mr Allen, on the Company’s behalf for £51 5s, which was repaid on 17 July 1614, when they also donated £12 ‘as a free guifte’ to His King’s Majesty. He was one of four guarantors of the bond taken by the Company when £60 was borrowed from Thomas Atkinson ‘for supplie of his Majesties present wants’ (4 January 1627/8). His seniority and diplomacy were recognised when he was appointed, together with Mr Ratcliffe, to settle a dispute between Robert Bedall [the Company Beadle, Robert Betaugh] and Walter Hill about the former’s apprentice (21 August 1609). He was one of those who were deputed to attend a meeting with the Painter Stainers’ Company to seek agreement with them (25 August 1619). On 19 October 1621 he was one of the four overseers at the auditing of the disputed accounts of the previous Master and Wardens. And when Richard Talbott was appointed King’s Master Plasterer he was granted precedence over all the Company except Mr [John] Allen and Mr Browne (3 February 1625/6). He was last listed among the Assistants at a Court held on 9 September 1633.

Browne also appears to have attempted to secure the Company’s ownership of ‘The Three Tuns’ and ‘The King’s Head’ by purchasing the properties from the Company and their tenants (7 March 1629/30) and then bequeathing them to the Company in his will (19 March 1629/30); and on that date he gave a bond of £300 to John Allen, Edward Stanyan and John Taylor, senior plasterers, that the provisions of the will concerning these premises would not be altered.[170] A memorandum of 23 April 1631 recorded that further arrangements were necessary to raise money for the rebuilding of the Company’s houses in Wood Street (‘The Christopher’ and ‘The King’s Head’) and a loan of £100 was to be taken up for twelve months for this purpose. Richard Browne was one of those to put his mark in agreement with this decision. However, when Browne drew up his will on 29 June 1630 there was no reference to these properties and this will was proved on 11 November 1633.[171] By this date Browne was able to bequeath numerous properties of his own: to his wife and executrix, Elizabeth (two properties in Soper Lane, St Pancras, one of which was their home); to his son, Richard Browne II (two tenements in Botehall Lane, St Mary Colechurch); to his daughter, E???e Marshall (tenements in Black Horse Alley, near Fleet Street); to his daughter Elizabeth (properties in Finchley, Middlesex); to be shared between Richard II and E???e Marshall (two messuages in Saffron Hill, Holborn). All the legacies to his children were provisional on their not disputing the terms of the will. In addition to small monetary legacies to them all, he left £5 to the Plasterers’ Company to spend on a supper in his memory.

BROWNE, Richard II (b. 1600; fl. 1620-55?)

The son of Richard I who was baptised in 1600 at the Church of St Pancras Soper Lane, with Richard Dungan standing as godfather.[172] He does not appear to have served an apprenticeship but paid his abling fine on 5 June 1621 and was listed in the Yeomanry of the Company from 1620-33. He was a beneficiary in 1633 under the will of his father, Richard Browne I. He was fined for bad work within Bishopsgate (30 April 1628). Between January 1626 and August 1628 seven apprentices were presented by Richard Browne but it is not clear whether this was the father or son: Richard Bancock (apprentice of Henry Stanley turned over to him, 25 January 1626); Henry Price (25 April 1626); Ellis Osborne (2 February 1627); Richard Fudge (1 May 1627); John Hall (25 July 1627); John Wastney (30 August 1627); Richard Marshall (1 September 1628). Further confusion is caused by the presence of Richard Browne III, the son of a Yorkshire husbandman, who was presented for 8 years by Thomas Hithersole on 25 January 1619/20. He paid his abling fine on 2 December 1628, when his master paid a fine for freeing him before his full term, and his beadleship fine on 14 September 1635. In the Quarterage Accounts Richard Browne II is distinguished as ‘senior’ from Richard Browne III as ‘junior’ but such a distinction is not always made in the Court Minute Book where payment of arrearage of quarterage continued until 1 August 1655.

BROWNE, Richard III (fl. 1628-55?)

A Plasterer, the son of a Yorkshire husbandman, who was presented for 8 years by Thomas Hithersole on 25 January 1619/20. He paid his abling fine on 2 December 1628, when his master paid a fine for freeing him before his full term., and his beadleship fine on 14 September 1635. In the Quarterage Accounts Richard Browne II is distinguished as ‘senior’ from Richard Browne III as ‘junior’ but such a distinction is not always made in the Court Minute Book where payment of arrearage of quarterage by one Richard Browne continued until 1 August 1655.

BROWNE, Robert I (d. 1592)

‘Robt Browne playsterer, howsholder’ was buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 17 September 1592. He may have been Thomas Kellie’s neighbour who was left 20s in return for acting as a witness and overseer to the will made in 1587 and proved in 1588/9.

BROWNE, Robert II (fl. 1581-1610)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Thomas Kellie on 30 April 1574, paid his abling fine on 4 August 1581 and his beadleship fine on 25 July 1582. He presented Oliver Bloe as his apprentice on 25 July 1586 and was fined for absence on 12 September 1589. As his ex-apprentice he is a likely candidate for Thomas Kellie’s neighbour of the same name who was left 20s in return for acting as a witness and overseer to the will made in 1587 and proved in 1588/9. Browne was employed in the Royal Works on routine plastering at Whitehall in 1591-2[173] and 1610-11[174] but did not live to be listed in the Quarterage Accounts, which are incomplete for the years 1604-10.

BROWNE, Thomas I (fl. 1575; d. 1617/8)

A Plasterer among those paying fines on 2 November 1571 and presumably the brother of Richard Browne I. Thomas was assessed at £3 as a householder of Blackhorse Alley in St Bride Fleet Street in 1598, alongside Richard Browne.[175] He was recorded among the Yeomanry of the Company until 1617. He was employed in the Royal Works on routine plastering and whiting at Reading for 27 days at 13d per day in 1568[176] and at Greenwich for 12 days at 12d per day in June 1569.[177] In 1575-76 Richard Brigges, Ralph Bettes and Thomas Browne were subcontracted by the Bricklayer John Taylor to work at the old house of the Dowager Lady Sheffield at Blackfriars and its new extension.[178] He was fined for bad work on numerous occasions: 8 May and 8 August 1573; 29 January and 6 August 1574; 21 October 1575; 23 April and 19 August 1580; March and 28 July (Brokes Wharf) 1581; 16 November 1582 (on London Bridge); 8 March (by Paul’s Wharf), 16 August (Fetter Lane) and 30 August (Chancery Lane, paid by his brother Richard) 1583; 3 November 1587 (at Blackfriars); 31 July 1590 (in Salisbury Alley); 2 May 1595 (in Fleet Street); 20 November 1598; 2 November 1599 (three times); 25 April 1605; 5 May 1606 (in Smithfield); Court Day, August and 6 November 1606 (in Fetter Lane); 28 April 1607 (in Lumber Street and at Holborn Bridge); 14 August 1607 (Mr Browne in Huggin Lane); 15 March 1609 (in several places); 25 February 1613 (upon Holborn Hill). He was also fined twice for coming without ‘cloke or gowne’ (17 June 1575 and 6 April 1582). The apprentices presented by him were: Richard Cooke (4 March 1587); Thomas Gorton (24 July 1594); Thomas Goldsmith was turned over to him from Francis Matthew (14 May 1602); Robert Mason (27 April 1604); Thomas Holliar (1 February 1605). Roger Metcalfe was fined for slandering Mr Thomas Browne on 28 July 1602. The use of ‘Mr’ was probably to distinguish him from Thomas Browne II, who was freed on the same day,  as the older man had not progressed beyond the Yeomanry of the Company to become Master.

His wife, Joan, of St Bride, was the plaintiff in a lawsuit in 1587, in which Richard Smith, servant of Richard Browne, Plaisterer, of St Bride, aged 18, was a witness.[179]

BROWNE, Thomas II (fl. 1602)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Smalladge Kelly on 13 October 1584 and made free on 28 July 1602, when he presented the Company with a silver spoon with his name on. He does not appear to have lived long after this date as his name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts but it is just possible that he was the plasterer of this name working on routine plastering for the Royal Works at St James’s Palace (1607-9)[180] and at Greenwich (1610-11).[181] He may also have been responsible for some of the bad work and apprentices ascribed to Thomas Browne I between 1602 and c 1610.

BRYAN, Richard (fl. 1575)

A Plasterer who was fined for an offence while still an apprentice (2 September 1575) and who paid his abling and admission fines the following month (21 October 1575).

BULL, John (fl. 1562-81)

A Plasterer of St Martin Ludgate, recorded in the parish register at the baptism of his daughter Alice on 23 January 1561/2.[182] Unspecified fines were paid on 2 November 1571, 16 May and 27 June 1572. On 8 February 1571/2 he was fined again, this time for taking work from John Hayward. He paid for the return of Thomas Ramsey (28 February 1571/2) and for the Company’s ‘good will to have an apprentice’ (25 April 1572); presumably an apprentice to which he was not entitled. Before 4 June 1574 he must have been selected for the Livery as he was one of those paying for a pattern for the renewal of his livery on that date. He was fined for coming to the hall in his cloak (4 February 1574/5) and for bad work (6 May 1575). He was one of those making a donation towards the costs of the Company’s parliamentary bill ‘tuching artificers’ (March 1580/1). He presented Francis Broadbent as his apprentice (18 November 1575) and is last recorded when William Bottom paid for his return (4 August 1581).

BUNCE (BUNCH), Daniel (fl. 1616-c 1650)

A Plasterer who was presented by Mr Terry on 8 June 1608 and freed on 22 November 1616, remaining in the Yeomanry until at least 1633. When the Company levied an assessment of 40s Bunce undertook to pay the amount in two instalments (29 March 1627). He presented Charles Porter as his apprentice on 29 March 1627 (he completed his term on 3 July 1635. On 23 April 1636 Bunce was granted charity. He took over Thomas Hothersole’s apprentice, John Hobdale on 3 August 1636 for the remaining four years of his term (20 May 1640) and presented Walter Butler, the son of a clothier from Kingsclere, for 8 years (25 July 1640). On 25 July 1645 he took another apprentice, John Dolphine, the son of a Lincolnshire painter, who was freed on 26 July 1652, by which date Bunce must have died, as it was Widow Bunce who paid arrearage of quarterage on that date.

BURD, Thomas (fl. 1573)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine on 3 July 1573.

BURTBY, Edward (fl. 1571-78)

A plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, who married Anne Clonne at his parish church on 24 June 1571. In 1572 he was paid 14s. 5d. by the Merchant Taylors’ Company for three days’ work in the company hall, with his labourer, and for Spanish white and lime.[183] In 1577-78 he was paid 2s. by the same company for two dozen of Spanish white (at 8d. the dozen), hair (3d.) and 12d. for a day’s work.[184] Edward Burtby ‘howsholder’ was buried on 12 July 1578 at St Giles Cripplegate.[185] [Given his employment by the Merchant Taylors’ Company it is highly likely that Burtby was a member of the Plasterers’ Company, although his name does not appear in the surviving records.]

BURTON, Anthony (fl. 1613; d. c 1630)

A Plasterer who was presented by Henry Brigges (25 April 1605) and freed 12 May 1613. While still an apprentice he was one of those paid at the rate of 2s. by the Merchant Taylors’ Company in 1607.[186] Between 15 August and 9 October 1614 he was working for 26¾ days at the Charterhouse at 2s per day. On 25 July 1618 he was fined for bad work in St Martin’s Lane and elsewhere and presented William Clark II, son of a Northamptonshire mercer, for 8 years. John Wedge, son of a Wiltshire yeoman, apprenticed himself to Burton for 8 years on 11 August 1626. He was fined for absence on the previous Quarter Day (26 January 1628/9) and was recorded as ‘deceased’ on 15 June 1632, when Wedge was turned over to Mr Richard Browne I. Burton remained in the Yeomanry until he died c 1630. His widow’s name is crossed through in the Quarterage Accounts of 1632.

BURTON, Jerome/Jeremy (fl. 1612; d. 1624)

A Plasterer, the son of a Yorkshire husbandman, who was presented by Thomas Dewberry for 8 years on 1 February 1604/5. A memorandum of 12 February 1607/8 recorded that he had ‘departed away from his master on Easter Monday 1607 and he cam againe to his master the 1st December 1607’. He was turned over from Dewberry to Mr Atkinson (23 January 1609/10) but instead of completing his apprenticeship he bought his freedom by redemption on 9 December 1612 and made a gift to the Company of a gilt cup. Nevertheless, the Company had him committed on 25 January 1614/15 and 29 August 1616. He signed his own name to a memorandum of 23 February 1616/17. His name appears in the Quarterage Accounts from 1612-23 but is crossed through in 1624.

BURTON, John (fl. 1590; d. before 1604)

A Plasterer who presented Patrick Burton, ‘his man’, on 18 June 1590. He was working with other plasterers and tilers for the Royal Works on various roofs at Whitehall, including the little close tennis court next the park and the gallery adjoining, in 1600-1.[187]

BURTON (BUTTON), Robert (fl. 1561; d. 1613)

A Plasterer of St Ethelburga Bishopsgate who was assessed as a householder of that parish in 1577 (£3); 1582 (£3); 1598 (£5) and 1600 (£5).[188] In August 1561-2 he worked for 12 days for the Clothworkers’ Company at their property in Fleet Lane at 14d per day.[189] He was employed by them again in 1594 when he was paid 6s 8d for the 5 days he worked in November at ‘the newe building of the parlour’.[190] He was employed by the Royal Works at Greenwich in May and June 1569 for a total of 35 days at 12d per day.[191] He first appears in the Company records when he paid for permission to present an anonymous apprentice (8 August 1573). He was already a member of the Livery by 4 June 1574 when he paid for his pattern for a renewed livery, which was repeated on 25 July 1582. He was fined for ‘supplanting’ Thomas Hampshire (29 July 1575) and for an unspecified offence (13 October 1577). He presented William Burton (19 August 1580) and John Sores (25 July 1583). He was elected Junior Warden for 1582-3 when William Brigges declined the office. He is the most likely candidate for ‘Burton the plasterer’ who was working alongside Richard Barfield at Tallow-Chandlers’ Hall, earning 58s 8d in 1584-5[192] and 10s 10d in 1585-6, when he was ‘whiting and mending in the hall’.[193] He was unable to write as he used his mark to sign a Company memorandum of 25 March 1586. He presented an anonymous apprentice on 20 May 1587 and on 13 October 1589 he paid to have the apprentice of Widow Brigges [William Brigges’ widow] turned over to him. On 11 September 1590 he was fined for failing to bring in the indentures of the apprentice who had run away and on the same day he paid to have Matthew Barrett turned over to him. He was followed by James Greene (25 January 1591). Burton was elected Senior Warden for 1592-3 and Master for the following year and again for 1598-9.

He was fined for ill language to Mr [Raphe]Bettes (10 September 1597). More apprentices followed: John Chambers (4 November 1597); anonymous [torn page] (18 February 1598); Anthony Sharpe was turned over to him (28 April 1599); Abraham Lawe, son of a Lincolnshire gardener (25 January 1599/1600); and the same year he paid for the abling of William Varnam, apprentice of William Burton (8 February); John Holdipp (8 May 1601). Burton was fined for unseemly speeches to the Younger Warden [Richard Terrey] (26 July 1601 and for ill work in Aldermanbury (3 November 1601, 30 April 1602, 8 March 1603/4); for evil work (1 February 1604/5); and for evil work at Dr Langford’s (26 November 1606). On 28 November 1605 Robert Hickson was turned over to him.  In 1609 he was fined for ill work in Aldermanbury (30 March) and for selling an apprentice contrary to the Company’s Ordinances (31 August). His next apprentices were Robert Drury (9 July 1610) and William Newman (27 April 1612).

Following Burton’s death in 1613 his apprentice Robert Langley (not previously recorded) was turned over to William North (15 November 1613). Burton made his final will on 17 October 1613.[194] He asked to be buried in his parish church. He left Michael Burton £4, Peter Burton 40s., Peter Raynford 40s., Sallina 40s. and the bedstead that was used by Burton’s servant, Robert Langley. John Burton, son of John Burton, Shoemaker was left £4; Lawrence Williamson, Cordwainer, was left Burton’s tapestry-covered cushions, a carpet, and his livery gown welted with velvet. He bequeathed to Williamson’s wife a pair of flaxen sheets, a diaper tablecloth and six napkins; to William North ‘the painted Cloth about the hall in his owne occupacon and also the painted cloth about the chamber where I now lye’. He left North’s wife, Joane, a green curtain that hung in the hall. Burton also forgave his apprentices William Newman and Robert Langley one year of their apprenticeship, stipulating that ‘all my right and interest in them for and during the residue of their yeres which shalbe unexpired’ was transferred to William North. The residue of his estate was left to his brother George Burton of Warmington in Northampton. Lawrence Williamson and William North were named as overseers and George Burton executor. Probate was granted on 13 October 1613.

[He is possibly the ‘Robert Barton’ who was appointed by the Governors of Christ’s Hospital in August 1579 to do all needful work for the Hospital.[195]]

BURTON, Thomas (fl. 1602-3)

A Plasterer and householder, buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 11 September 1603.[196] He was apprenticed to John Bennett (17 March 1594/5) and freed 24 April 1602. In 1602 he donated a silver spoon to the Company either ‘with his name on’ (28 July) or with ‘T.B’. (5 August). He appears in the Quarterage Accounts for 1604, annotated ‘mort’.

BURTON, William (fl. 1587; d. before 1604)

A Plasterer presented by Robert Burton on 19 August 1580, who paid his abling fine on 25 July and his beadleship fine on 1 September 1587. He presented an apprentice William Varnam (28 January 1591/2). He was selected for the Livery and paid for his ‘pattern’ for his new outfit on 9 August 1594. He was fined for lateness at ‘the standing … on Candlemasse daye’ (8 November 1594) and for ill work by his apprentice at Puddle Wharf (28 April 1599). Another apprentice, Richard Templer, the son of an Oxfordshire yeoman, was presented for 7 years and 1 year journeyman (19 June 1600). He was followed by William Cooke, the son of a Lincolnshire yeoman, for 8 years (26 July 1601); and George Bowne, the son of a Dorset yeoman, for 8 years (5 May 1603). As his name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts he must have died in 1603-4.

BUTTERFIELD (BATTERFEILDE), Richard (fl. 1617- d. after 1654)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Humfrey Dovey (28 August 1607) who was freed on 7 November 1617. On 25 January 1618/19 he presented his own apprentice, William Butterfield [perhaps a younger brother or other relative]. Edward Archard, son of a Worcestershire saddler, was presented by him for 9 years (13 October 1627). He is last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 23 June 1654, when his own son William was freed by patrimony.

BUTTERFIELD, William (fl. 1625; d. 1628)

A Plasterer, son of an Essex husbandman, who was presented by Richard Butterfield for 7 years on 25 January 1618/19. He was made free on 25 January 1625/6 but is only listed among the Yeomanry of the Company from 1625-7 and ‘died’ in 1628.


[1] LMA P69/BOT1/B/013/MS 01454/001.

[2] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009: Merchant Taylors’ Company Wardens’ Accounts 1597-1609.

[3] LMA DL/AL/C/003/MS 09052/005.

[4] LMA P69/MIC1/A/001/MS 06986.

[5] LMA P69/ALH4/A/001/MS 17613.

[6] R G Lang, Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 and 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 128; TNA E 179/146/372; E 179/146/393; E 179/146/399.

[7] LMA CLC/L/TC/D/001/MS 6152/001, f. 233v and 6152/002, f. 7r.

[8] Essex CRO, D/DP A18-22, transcribed by Professor Malcolm Airs. A.C. Edwards, ‘Sir John Petre and Some Elizabethan London Tradesmen’, London Topographical Record, 23 (1974), 72-3. J.C. Ward & K. Marshall, Old Thorndon Hall, Essex Record Office Publications, 61, Chelmsford, 1972.

[9] TNA AO 1/2415/21.

[10] LMA CLC/L/FE/B/001/MS 05570/001, Court Ledger No.1, 1592-1610, Court held 29 March 1602.

[11] LMA DL/AL/C/003/MS 09052/001D.

[12] LMA DL/AL/C/003/MS 09052/003C.

[13] HHA Bills 28.

[14] Kent History & Library Centre: Sackville Papers, U 269, A389/1.

[15] TNA E 351/3244, AO 1/2423/52.

[16] TNA AO 1/2420/42.

[17] TNA AO 1/2422/48 & 50; AO 1/2423/53.

[18] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[19] LMA CLC/L/SE/D/007/MS 30727/004.

[20] TNA E 36/241.

[21] Bodleian MS Rawlinson D.777.

[22] Nottingham University MS Newcastle/02.

[23] LMA P69/TRI3/B/004/MS 04835/001

[24] LMA P69/ANN/A/008/MS 04510/001.

[25] LMA COL/CHD/FR/01/001/MS 00512. This document is too fragile to handle and is best accessed at C Welch (translator & ed), Register of Freedoms of the City of London in the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI, London (1908), for London and Middlesex Archaeological Society, p. 107.

[26] Bodleian MS Rawlinson D.779.

[27] Bodleian Foljambe MS.

[28] Bodleian MS Rawlinson D.785.

[29] LMA COL/CA/01/015, Repertory 13, Part 2, ff. 313v, 333v, 335v, 336r and COL/AD/01/017, Letter Book R.

[30] The Records of the Honorable Society of Lincoln’s Inn. The Black Books. Vol. I. From AD 1422 to AD 1586, Lincoln’s Inn (1897), p. 38v.

[31] TNA STAC5/P52/15.

[32] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[33] Kent History & Library Centre: Sackville Papers U 269/A 516/1, A 389/1, A 508.

[34] TNA E 351/3244.

[35] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/048, numbered for digitization 19.

[36] TNA E 36/237-9, 243-5.

[37] TNA E 36/235 & 237.

[38] Bodleian MS Rawlinson D.785.

[39] Bodleian MS Rawlinson D.783.

[40] LMA COL/CA/01/015, Repertory 13, Part 2, ff. 313v, 333v, 335v, 336r and COL/AD/01/017, Letter Book R.

[41] LMA CLC/L/CC/D/002/MS 04326/003.

[42] LMA CLC/L/BA/D/001/MS 05174/002.

[43] LMA CLC/L/BA/D/001/MS 05174/002; LMA P69/MRY2/B/005/MS 03556/001.

[44] LMA P69/MRY2/B/005/MS 03556/001 f. 31.

[45] R G Lang(ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 and 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p.208.

[46] HMC, Calendar of MSS of Marquis of Salisbury at Hatfield House, Part XIV (Addenda), London (1923), p. 39.

[47] TNA PROB 11/69/182 .

[48] TNA C 142/210/63 or WARD 7/21/152, Simon Betoughe.

[49] TNA PROB 11/88.

[50] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/055, numbered for digitization 212.

[51] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS06419/001.

[52] John Cordy Jeaffreson, Middlesex County Records, 4 vols, Middlesex County Records Society (1886), vol. 1, p. 132.

[53] TNA E 159/355 rots. 212, 213, 215.

[54] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.

[55] LMA CLC/L/IB/D/001/MS 16988/002, f 46 v.

[56] B Marsh (transcriber) & J Ainsworth (ed), Records of the Worshipful Company of Carpenters, London (1939), Vol. VI, p.148.

[57] TNA E 210/10340.

[58] TNA E 159/355 rots. 212, 213, 215.

[59] TNA E 179/145/252; R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 and 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 195.

[60] LMA CLC/L/PG/A/004/MS 06132. Copy of the Order made in the Plasiterers’ Company Book of Ordinances.

[61] TNA STAC5/P52/15.

[62] TNA PROB 11/95/184.

[63] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[64] LMA CLA/002/01/1, f. 111r.

[65] R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 and 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 216.

[66] LMA P69/BOT2/A/002/MS 09221/001.

[67] TNA STAC5/P52/15.

[68] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[69] LMA P69/LAW1/B/008/MS 02593/001 ff 175r, 190r.

[70] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[71] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA.5/15 (1578–9), f. 18v.

[72] Northampton County Record Office: Nassington 217/P/1.

[73] LMA CLC/L/SE/D/007/MS 30727/004.

[74] LMA CLC/L/BF/D/001/MS 05442/004.

[75] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A. 195c, f. 138v.

[76] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.

[77] Kent History & Library Centre: Sackville Papers U 269/1, AP 45.

[78] National Register of Archives for Scotland: 217 Box 5 no. 610.

[79] LMA P69/BOT4/A/001/MS 04515/001.

[80] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[81] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48.

[82] Kent History & Library Centre: Sackville Papers U 269/AP 45 and A 516/1.

[83] Middle Temple Treasurer’s Account Book 1641-6 (4), p. 106 (222).

[84] TNA WORK 5/1.

[85] TNA PROB 11/95, ff.149v-151v.

[86] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[87] LMA P69/DUN2/B/011/MS 02968/001.

[88] R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 & 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 281.

[89] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[90] R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 & 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 128.

[91] LMA DL/AL/C/001/MS 09050/005, f. 162.

[92] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA 5/22 (1585-6), f. 19r.

[93] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA 5/15 (1578–9), ff. 12r, 17v, 18v.

[94] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA.5/19 (1582–83), f. 17v.

[95] Drapers’ Company Arcjove: RA 5/22 (1585-6), f. 19r.

[96] TNA E 179/145/252; R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 & 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 196.

[97] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/015B.

[98] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.

[99] LMA CLC/429/MS 02192. Extracts from Plasterers’ Company Court Book made in mid-19th century.

[100] TNA E 36/252.

[101] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.775, ff. 177, 199.

[102] Bodleian Library MSS Rawlinson D.775, ff. 115v, 128v; D.778, f. 110r; D.780, f 235r; Nottingham University MSS Newcastle Ne.01 and 02;

[103] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.775, f. 35v, D.776, f. 11v, D.780, ff. 24v and 33v.

[104] Bodleiain Library Foljambe MS, pp. 18, 31, 37, 46, 53.

[105] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.780, ff. 137r, 143r; D.781, ff. 43r, 77r, 82r; Nottingham University MS Newcastle Ne.02.

[106] TNA E 36/237, ff. 792 and 806.

[107] BL Add. MS 10109, ff. 35v, 42v, 46r.

[108] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.779, 783-5; Nottingham University Newcastle Ne.02.

[109] TNA E 101/504/2, f. 131r.

[110] Longleat MS R.O.B. I, ff. 195-6.

[111] C Welch (translator & ed), Register of Freemen of the City of London in the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI, London (1908), London & Middlesex Archaeological Society, pp. 107 and 112.

[112] LMA COL/CA/01/015, Repertory 13, Part 2, ff. 313v, 333v, 335v, 336r and COL/AD/01/017, Letter Book R.

[113] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.775-777, passim.

[114] Nottingham University Newcastle MS Ne.01

[115] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D. 780, f 240r; TNA E 101/504/2, f. 55v.

[116] LMA CLC/429/MS 03555/003.

[117] Longleat MS R.O.B. I, ff. 195-6.

[118] LMA COL/CA/01/015, Repertory 13, Part 2, ff. 313v, 333v, 335v, 336r and COL/AD/01/017, Letter Book R.

[119] LMA COL/CA/01/015, Repertory 13, Part 2, f.336

[120] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[121] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[122] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48.

[123] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[124] LMA P71/OLA 009.

[125] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[126] Nottingham University Newcastle MS Ne.03

[127] TNA E 101/504/2, f. 131r.

[128] The Clothworkers’ Company: CL/D/5/3 (Quarter & Renter Wardens’ Accounts 1578-98).

[129] LMA P69/AND4/A/001/MS 04107/001.

[130] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA 5/35 (1594-5), f. 26v.

[131] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA 6/3 (1606-7), f. 14r.

[132] TNA E 351/3244.

[133] TNA STAC 5/P52/15.

[134] Loreen L Giese, London Consistory Court Depositions, 1586-1611: List and Indexes, London Record Society, 32 (1995), pp. 266-7.

[135] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/007/1.

[136] LMA DL/AL/C/003/MS 09052/007/2.

[137] LMA MS 9052/7/2.

[138] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/014E.

[139] TNA E 179/145/252.

[140] Lang, R G (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 and 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 196.

[141] TNA LR/2/64.

[142] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 244v and 253v.

[143] TNA E 210/D10340.

[144] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA 5/15 (1578-9), f. 18v.

[145] The Clothworkers’ Company: CL/D/5/3 (Quarter & Renter Wardens’ Accounts 1578-98).

[146] TNA REQ 2/289/71.

[147] LMA CLC/429/MS 03555/003.

[148] TNA REQ 2/272/23.

[149] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA 5/19 (1582-3), f. 17v.

[150] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c,

[151] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[152] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.

[153] The Records of the Honorable Society of Lincoln’s Inn. The Black Books. Vol. I. From AD 1422 to AD 1586, Lincoln’s Inn (1897), Appendix I, p. 31.

[154] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/017, f. 368.

[155] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.

[156] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[157] Drapers’ Company Archive: RA/19 (1582-3), f. 17v.

[158] LMA CLC/429/MS 03555/003.

[159] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[160] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[161] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48, passim.

[162] TNA PROB 11/182, p. 382.

[163] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/019A.

[164] LMA DL/C/B/001/MS 09168/16, f. 118v.

[165] TNA D 24/486: Chancery Town Depositions. Testimony of Richard Browne, plasterer.

[166] Richard Smith, servant of Richard Browne, Plaisterer, of St Bride, aged 18, was a witness in the lawsuit brought by Joan Browne, wife of Thomas Browne, of St Bride, q v.

[167] TNA E 351/3244, Taskwork.

[168] TNA E 351/3245, Taskwork.

[169] TNA E 351/3247, Taskwork.

[170] LMA CLC/429/MS 03555/003, 21-3.

[171] TNA PROB/11/164.

[172] W B Bannerman (ed), The Registers of St Mary le Bow, Cheapside, All Hallows, Honey Lane & St Pancras, Soper Lane, Harleian Society, 44 (1914), Part I, Baptisms and Burials.

[173] TNA AO 1/2415/21, Taskwork.

[174] TNA AO 1/2419/41, Taskwork.

[175] TNA E 179/369.

[176] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, f. 397r.

[177] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, f. 130v.

[178] TNA E 210/D10340.

[179] Loreen L. Giese, London Consistory Court Depositions, 1586-1611: List and Indexes, London Record Society, 32 (1995), pp. 32-3.

[180] TNA E 351/3243, Taskwork.

[181] TNA E 351/3245, Taskwork.

[182] LMA P69/MTN1/A/002/MS 10213.

[183] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/005.

[184] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/005.

[185] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[186] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[187] TNA E 351/3236, Taskwork.

[188] TNA E 179/145/252; TNA E 179/146/369; R G Lang, Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 & 1582, London Record Society (1993), p.152; TNA E 179/146/397.

[189] The Clothworkers’ Company: CL/D/5/2 (Quarter & Renter Wardens’ Accounts 1558-78).

[190] The Clothworkers’ Company: CL/D/5/3 (Quarter & Renter Wardens’ Accounts 1578-98).

[191] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 120v & 130v.

[192] LMA CLC/L/TC/D/001/MS 06152/001, f. 233v.

[193] LMA CLC/L/TC/D/MS 06152/002, f. 7r.

[194] LMA DL/AL/C/003/MS 09052/04.

[195] LMA CLC/210/B/001/MS 12806/001, f. 246v.

[196] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.