Gazetteer of Plasterers - H

HADWYN, John (fl. 1567-8)

A plasterer who was one of the team working under Richard Tyffyn at Lincoln’s Inn from March-May 1567.[1]

HAGAN (HAGON, HEYGON), John (fl. 1625)

A Plasterer, son of a deceased London Haberdasher, presented by Morgan Blewett for 8 years (29 August 1617). Blewett was fined for not enrolling Hagan, when the latter paid his abling fine on 12 August 1625. His name is only listed in the Yeomanry of the Quarterage Accounts for that year.

HALE (HAILE, HAYLE), William (fl. 1617-37)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Leonard Smith (23 April 1610) and freed on 1 August 1617. He was a parishioner of St Botolph Bishopsgate, where he was granted a licence to marry Anne Lydyat, spinster of the same parish, on 30 December 1617.[2] Hale paid his beadleship fine (29 April 1618) and was selected for the Livery on 22 August 1621. He was fined for not serving one year as a journeyman, somewhat belatedly (25 July 1622); and for scandalous speeches, accusing the Master, Wardens and Assistants of dishonesty (4 September 1623). Bad work in a church near Bishopsgate Street incurred a further fine (30 July 1624). His first apprentice was John Powell, son of a Gloucestershire husbandman (25 April 1626), followed by William Lane, son of a Westminster gardener (freed 6 November 1638). Hale’s name last appears as ‘a poore man’ in receipt of charity on 2 February 1636/7.

HALL, Edmond/Edward (fl. 1604-32)

A Plasterer who paid for his ‘admission to the freedom’ on 7 September 1604 [presumably by redemption, as his apprenticeship was not recorded]. He presented his first apprentice, William Gibbs, on 26 January 1610/11. On 27 May 1616 Hall presented two apprentices, both for 9 years, Charles Whetnall, son of a London Grocer, and Nicholas Parke, son of a Painter-Stainer (Parke was freed 11 August 1626). Richard Wallington, son of a Buckinghamshire husbandman was apprenticed to him for 7 years (25 January 1618/19; freed 11 August 1626). William Wallis from Northamptonshire was presented for 7 years (25 October 1619). On 22 August 1621 Hall was among those paying 10s on being ‘chosen into the liverie’. Edward Pott, son of a Middlesex tailor was apprenticed to him for 7 years (26 November 1624). Hall was unsuccessful in the elections for Junior Warden held on 12 September 1625 and 11 September 1626. He was finally elected to serve for 1629-30 (14 September 1629) but it was recorded on 18 September that Hall ‘could not be found or heard of’ and he was replaced. On 29 September he paid the fine for refusing the office of under warden. The same situation arose in 1632, when he was again elected Junior Warden. On this occasion he turned down the office on the grounds of poverty and his fine was reduced, in view of the payment made by him on the previous occasion, when Mr [Richard] Rawlidge was Master (14 & 15 September 1632).

HALL, Robert (fl. 1584-9)

A plasterer whose master was Peter Sarson, who paid a fine on his behalf (31 July 1584). Hall was turned over to Randall Clarkson (17 February 1586/7) but his freedom was not recorded. Nevertheless, it was as a plasterer that Hall was listed as a resident of the parish of St Michael Bassishaw; he was granted a licence to marry Joane Allen, widow of Christ Church, relict of Nicholas Allen, Carpenter, of the same parish, by the Bishop of London on 26 August 1589.[3]

HALLAM, Walter (fl. 1601)

A Plasterer who was presented by Thomas Turner (1 February 1593/4) and paid his abling fine on 6 February 1600/01. Although he paid his beadleship fine on 1 August 1601 his name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts which survive from 1604 onwards.

HAMPSHIRE, Thomas (fl. 1572-5)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine on 27 June 1572 and his beadleship fine on 8 August 1573. Robert Burton was fined for supplanting Hampshire on 29 July 1575.

HANCOCK, Thomas (fl. 1611; d. 1649)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Derbyshire yeoman, presented for 8 years by Henry Towson (23 April 1604). He was made free on 14 June 1611 and paid his beadleship fine on 30 September 1612. For much of 1614 he was working under Kelham Roades at the Charterhouse. He began with 3 days in April-May at 20d but thereafter his rate increased to 2s and between May and November he worked for 89 days, earning £8 18s.[4] Hancock was one of those who put his mark, rather than a signature, to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). He paid the fine for not serving one year as a journeyman and presented his first apprentice, John Smith the Younger, son of a Middlesex tailor, for 7 years (1 May 1617). Subsequent apprentices were: William Denning, son of a Northumberland husbandman, for 8 years (22 May 1626); Griffin Maymor, son of a Berkshire husbandman, for 7 years (30 April 1638). Hancock made a free gift of 10s towards the costs of the Company’s building work (9 May 1631). He was otherwise only recorded paying arrearage of quarterage until 18 October 1640, when he was in receipt of charity. He received a charitable payment from Benson’s gift (26 July 1641) and remained a pensioner until his death was recorded (23 April 1649).

HAND (HANDE, HAUNE), Cornelius (fl. 1537-1586)

A Plasterer who was still an apprentice when he was working for the Royal Works at Oatlands in 1537-8. In August-September 1537 he was listed among the apprentices when he worked for 4 days at 5d per day. In November-December 1537 he appeared among the labourers, receiving only 5d per day; but in July-September 1538 he was included among the plasterers working at 7d per day.[5] In November 1547 ‘Cornelius Haune’ was a beneficiary under the will of Morgan Rowe, a fellow-plasterer in the Royal Works at both Hampton Court and Oatlands and was to receive ‘a satten doublett, wt a longe ladder whiche is now at Waltehamstowe’.[6] Hand was earning 16d per day by the time that he was employed for 6 days at the Bakers’ Company hall in 1559-1560, alongside Thomas Warbishe.[7] In 1561 he was working with Simon Betaugh for 8 days on routine work for the Carpenters’ Company.[8]

By 1570 Hand had risen in the ranks of the Company and served as Senior Warden for 1570-71. He presented John Caroll as his apprentice in 1571 (no date given); and later that year he was elected Master for 1571-2, subsequently serving again in 1574-5 and 1580-1. He paid 2s 6d to ‘have an apprentice before the yeare be oute of his other apprentice’ (8 August 1572) and presented Richard Money on 4 September 1572. Another apprentice (name illegible) was presented 29 January 1573/4. On January 25 1574/5 it was recorded that 2s 1d had been ‘spent on the Company the 26th of January at Mr Hands at our comyng from Sir Christopher Drapers.’ A memorandum of 10 September 1576 recorded the agreement of the Court, at which Hand was present, to the proposal that anyone serving twice as Master should be entitled to a third apprentice. Hand paid for the return of an anonymous apprentice (13 October 1576) and presented Ellis Crompton (15 February 1576/7); William Benson (20 November 1579), when Hande was also fined ‘for speaking of words’; William White (25 July 1582); an apprentice was returned to Edmund Harrison (14 December 1582); William Crompton (30 August 1583); John Lea (8 May 1584); James Bedlowe (13 November 1584). William Crompton and William Benson were both turned over to other masters on 2 July 1585 and a charitable payment was made to Hande on 25 March 1586, the last occasion on which his name appeared in the Company records. He was probably the householder assessed at £5 in the Parish of All Saints Stayninges in 1582.[9]

HAND (HANDE, HINDE), Matthew (fl. 1595-9)

A Plasterer who was presented by Thomas Kellie (31 January 1583/4). When he paid his abling fine he also made a goodwill donation on 25 August 1595. He was recorded as a plasterer of St Dunstan in the West in the parish registers at the baptism of a son, Richard, on 4 December 1595.[10] He was fined for ill work in Drury Lane (21 November 1595) and was warned before the Lord Mayor at the Guildhall (14 January 1595/6). The outcome of a hearing at the Court at the Guildhall was recorded on 11 May 1598, when it was decided that Hand was not entitled to have taken on Thomas Askall as an apprentice (following the death of his master) and should take on a journeyman instead. Hand was then fined for keeping an apprentice contrary to Company ordinances (16 June 1598) and paid off the 40s fine in instalments (20 November 1598). A repayment was made to Mr [John] Jackson ‘as Mathew Hand’s man has departed from him’ [perhaps a journeyman borrowed by Jackson] (30 November 1599).

HAND, Thomas (fl. 1608)

A Plasterer who was presented by John Lea (28 April 1600) and freed 29 April 1608. He is listed in the Yeomanry and noted as ‘died’ in the Quarterage Accounts for that year.

HAND (HANDE), William (fl. 1568)

A plasterer working under Richard Brigges between July and September 1568, during the Queen’s Progress, at Enfield (15 days) and Hatfield (16 days) at 12d per day.[11]

HARRIS, Anthony (fl. 1569)

A plasterer working under Thomas Kellie at Eltham Palace for 48 days between May and July 1569 at 12d per day.[12]

HARRIS, William (fl. 1618-29)

A Plasterer who was presented by Peter Hayward on 14 January 1609/10 and was made free on 30 January 1617/18. He remained in the Yeomanry and paid arrearage of quarterage on 13 August 1629; but is not listed in the Quarterage Accounts after that date.

HARRISON (HARRYSON), Edward/Edmond (fl. 1577-1608)

A Plasterer, presumably the apprentice of Richard Bellowes who paid for his return on 6 February 1572/3. Harryson paid his abling and admission fines (15 February 1576/7) and made a goodwill donation to the Company (15 August 1577), followed by his beadleship fine (25 July 1578). Harrison contributed to the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill (Court Day March 1580/1) and was fined for not wearing a gown or cloak (6 April 1582). It appears that he was selected for the Livery but was permitted to make his payments for his pattern in instalments (25 January 1583/4) and he duly paid off his debt (31 July, 13 October 1584, 25 January 1584/5, 12 September 1585). A fine was incurred when ‘he maid no dinner in the hall’ (4 September 1592). He was, nevertheless, elected Junior Warden for 1592-3. On 5 November 1596 Francis Matthew was fined for arresting Harrison ‘without licence of the house’. Harrison was listed in the Quarterage Accounts in the Yeomanry for 1608 but was replaced by Widow Harrison for 1609.

Harrison presented his first apprentice, Robert Welhedd, on 5 February 1579/80, who must have been the unnamed apprentice returned to him from Cornelius Hand (14 December 1582). Subsequent apprentices were: Raphe Gower (16 November 1586); the apprentice of William Clarke [possibly Mark Williams, already turned over to Henry Bettes] was turned over to him (17 March 1592/3); William Dobbyn (1 March 1593/4); Roger Spooner (8 November 1594); Henry Jones (23 April 1602). He was fined for bad work in Crutched Friars and Fetter Lane (16 August 1583); for ill work with Richard Browne (16 November 1586); for evil work in Holborn with William Ashley and in St Brides Churchyard on his own account (28 July 1587); for ill work in Fleet Street with John Laycock (3 November 1587); for ill work in Holborn (25 January 1587/8); for ill work (28 January 1591/2); for ill work at Mr Carr’s without Temple Bar, in the garrets, with Robert Cusack (4 September 1592, 7 February 1592/3); ill work in Holborn (1 February 1593/4); ill work (1 March 1593/4). On 23 April 1590 Harrison was one of the witnesses to the will of his erstwhile colleague, John Laycock. His son John was freed by patrimony after his father’s death.

HARRISON (HARRYSON), Ellis (fl. 1572-94)

A Plasterer who was one of those given some authority over ‘furniture’ belonging to the Company (8 August 1572). He was promoted to the Livery and paid for his pattern (14 July 1574). He served as Junior Warden for 1579-80 and was elected Senior Warden for 1589-90. On 28 July 1581 he was a member of the Court of Assistants that ratified an earlier order of the Company. He put his mark to the memorandum confirming the loan made to the Company by Ralph Bettes (25 March 1586). His apprentices were: Thomas Thorpe (4 September 1572); William Rowe (15 February 1576/7); William ___ (13 October 1580); Thomas Jackson (25 January 1583/4); Richard Stephenson was turned over to William Bottom (13 October 1588). He paid an unspecified fine of 12d (13 October 1577) and Mr Harrison received a payment in charity on 2 August 1594, the last occasion on which his name was recorded. As a resident of the precinct of St Katherine Creechurch he was assessed at the rate of £3 in the lay subsidy of 1582.[13]

HARRISON, (HARRYSON), Henry (fl. 1603; d. 1611)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, recorded in the parish registers at the burial of his wife Margaret (12 July 1603); the baptism of a son (4 November 1610); and Harrison’s own burial on 30 October 1611.[14] In May 1605 he received £9 11s 8d for plastering work at Syon House, the Middlesex home of the Duke of Northumberland, where he was paid for fretting one chamber in the uppermost most lodging and bordering two chambers in his Lordship’s lodgings.[15] A Company memorandum of 11 October 1608 ordered that Harrison, ‘whoe obtained his freedome by redempcion by means of Sir James Pemberton in the Court of Aldermen, shalbe made free of this company by consent of the Court of Aldermen, that this company had denyed’. Harrison paid his dues on being made free by redemption on 27 October 1608 and paid quarterage as a member of the Yeomanry from 1608-10.

HARRISON, John (fl. 1610-22)

A Plasterer who was freed by patrimony as the son of Edward Harrison (14 January 1609/10). He presented Simon Clarke, son of a London brewer, as his apprentice for 7 years (2 December 1614); and Edward Smith, son of a Surrey husbandman, for 9 years (24 April 1620). On 8 May 1623 and 4 November 1624 arrearage of quarterage was paid by Widow Harrison, wife of the late John Harrison. Her name was not listed in the Quarterage Accounts after 1628.

HARRISON, Matthew (fl. 1588-93)

A Plasterer who was presented by Roger Spence on 29 April 1580. He paid his abling fine (28 June 1588) and his beadleship fine (25 July 1589). He was fined for ill work on 25 January 1592/3, the last occasion on which his name appears in the Company records.

HARRISON, Richard (fl. 1593)

A Plasterer who presented Hugh Harrison as his apprentice on 27 July 1593.

HARTE, John (fl. 1585; d. 1597)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, recorded in the parish registers at the baptism of a son on 19 February 1586/7 and at his own burial on 26 May 1597.[16] Harte paid his abling fine and gave a donation for the poor at his admission on 13 October 1585. He paid his bachelorship fine (20 May 1587) and his beadleship fine (1 September 1587). His apprentice, Zachary Boyce, was presented on 6 November 1590; followed by Thomas Lightfoot on 16 January 1595/6.

HASSARD (HASARD), Robert (fl. 1584; d. 1593)

A Plasterer apprenticed to John Bettes I (15 February 1576/7) but turned over to Rafe Bettes (8 November 1577). He paid his abling fine (23 April 1584) and presented Richard Holland as his apprentice (-- April 1587). His beadleship fine was paid in instalments (18 August, 3 November 1587). On 25 July 1588 the Beadle was paid for carrying Hassard to prison and he was imprisoned again on 5 March 1589/90 (when he was fined for ill language), on 26 November 1590, 23 April and 15 June 1593. He was fined for disobedience on 21 June 1593. Francis Francis was presented by him (27 February 1589/90). Hassard was a parishioner of St Stephen Coleman Street.[17] He made a nuncupative will on 9 October 1593 leaving all his goods to his wife Agnes and the lease of his house in Coleman Street to John Vardew, who was entrusted with the upbringing of his son. Robert.[18] Hassard was buried at St Stephen Coleman Street on 16 October and probate was granted to his widow on 13 November 1593.

HASTINGS, Reynold (fl. 1585-90)

A Plasterer who was presented by Thomas Ratcliffe on 13 October 1576 and paid his abling fine, also making a donation to the poor, on 23 April 1585. His beadleship fine was paid on 18 August 1587. In the meantime he was employed by the Mercers’ Company and was paid on 3 July 1585 for 2 days’ work at the rate of 16d. per day. His labourer John Averill [possibly John Avery] was paid for 2 days’ work at the rate of 10d. per day.[19] In 1586 an action was instituted against Hastings by John Vickars, a Painter-Stainer, ‘for exercising the art of a painter-stainer contrary to ordinances’.[20] Hastings was last recorded when he presented Thomas Modinge as his apprentice on 5 September 1590.

HAUGHTON, Thomas (fl. 1606-18)

A Plasterer who was admitted to the liberties of the City of London by redemption at the request of Sir Thomas Bennet, knight, and made free of the Company by virtue and authority of the said grant, paying 3s 4d as his admission fine (16 October 1606). Haughton continued to pay quarterage until 1618 but his name was crossed through in 1619.

HAYES (HAY, HEY), Thomas (fl. 1590-1620)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine on 6 November 1590. He was fined for ill work in Little Wood Street (26 July 1601). He presented Philip Hughes for 8 years (6 July 1604; turned over to Ellis Piggen on 8 December 1609); William Wollaston (10 May 1609) and was fined for releasing him one year early (27 May 1616); John Rymell for 8 years (30 June 1618). Hayes put his mark to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). His name is listed among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1620, when he was replaced by his widow, who continued to pay quarterage until 1623.

HAYWARD, Garrett (fl. 1591-1628)

A Plasterer who is first recorded making a goodwill payment (11 September 1591), followed by his beadleship fine (25 July 1592). On 15 October 1625 the Lord Mayor’s officer was paid in connection with ‘the enrolling of Garrett Hayward’s man’. Hayward is last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 13 June 1628, when his apprentice, John Elmes (originally presented by Mr [Edward] Waight), was freed.

HAYWARD, John (fl. 1572-6)

John Bull was fined for taking work from his fellow-Plasterer, John Hayward (8 February 1572).

Hayward presented --- Burd as his apprentice (14 July 1574); and the Company ‘laide oute aboute Robert Fawconer, Mr Haywards man’ (14 March 1575/6). The use of ‘Mr’ suggests that Hayward was a senior member of the Company, and possibly elderly, but he is otherwise unmentioned in Company records.

HAYWARD, Peter (fl. 1602-20)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Hugh Morris (17 March 1594/5), who paid his abling fine (14 May 1602) and donated a spoon with his initials to the Company (25 July 1603). He paid his beadleship fine on 17 August 1604. Hayward was fined for: ill work (27April 1604); evil work (1 February 1604/5); ‘taking A peece of work of A Carpenter and for ill workmanship done’ (30 November 1610); bad work near Long Lane end (30 January 1617/18). Hayward presented two apprentices: William Harris (14 January 1609/10); John Winslowe, son of a Buckinghamshire blacksmith, for 8 years). Hayward was one of those who put his mark to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). His name was listed in the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until crossed through in 1621.

HAYWARD, William (fl. 1624)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Northamptonshire labourer, apprenticed to Richard Graves, for 8 years (29 August 1616). He paid his abling fine on 26 July 1624 but his name only appears in the Quarterage Accounts for one year before being crossed through.

HEATH, James (fl. 1619; d. 1636)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Kent ropemaker, deceased, and was presented by Henry Towson for 8 years (2 August 1611). He was made free (13 October 1619) and paid a fine to avoid serving his beadleship year (5 September 1621). Francis Slowe, son of a Huntingdonshire husbandman, was apprenticed to him for 8 years (25 July 1626). On 11 May 1629 Heath was one of those putting his signature to the entry recording his promotion into the Livery, making a gift of £3 to the Company in addition to paying for his pattern of cloth. He presented Henry Strowde (16 December 1630; freed 2 February 1636/7). Heath added his signature to the memorandum requiring Liverymen to contribute 40s towards the cost of purchasing two tenements after the King’s Head burnt down (21 February 1630/1). On 19 April 1636 Heath made his will while living in Hosier Lane, in the parish of St Sepulchre. Besides the tenement in which he lived, ‘The Bell’, he held another tenement in Hosier Lane, The Bowle, which was let out; both were owned by the Hospital of St Bartholomew. The leases on these tenements were left to his wife, Elizabeth and from the rental income, a quarterly annuity was to be paid to his widowed mother. There were numerous small gifts to ‘kinsfolke’ and 20s to a pastor. The rest of the estate was bequeathed to his wife and probate was granted on 4 May 1636.[21]

HENLEY (HANDEY, HANDLYE), Thomas (fl. 1604-28)

A Plasterer presented by Bartholomew Holmes (8 April 1597) who paid his admission fine on being made free of the Company and the City (2 November 1604; 1 August 1605). He presented George George for 8 years (27 February 1610/11) and paid the fine for giving him time off his apprenticeship (4 August 1618). Henley was committed on 11 September 1620. His name appeared in the Quarterage Accounts until it was crossed through in 1628.

HENSHAWE, Nicholas (fl. 1594-1627)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to John Jackson (12 September 1586), paid his abling fine (13 October 1593) and his beadleship fine (23 August 1594). He presented Edward Stanyon for 7 years and 1 year’s journeymanship from Lady Day (23 February 1598/9; turned over to John Pritchard on 18 September 1601); but he was fined for ‘keeping his man [unnamed] unenrolled and not delivering his indenture at his departure’ (8 May 1601). On the same day he presented William Oker, son of a Leicestershire yeoman, for 7 years. John Stephenson was apprenticed to him for 8 years (5 May 1603); Henry Mitton (6 November 1605). Henshawe was employed at Holy Trinity the Less in 1605-06[22] and in 1607 he was one of the large team earning 2s per day, beautifying the hall of the Merchant Taylors’ Company prior to a royal visit.[23] On 28 August 1607 he was sent to the Compter. He was fined for ill work in Field Lane (24 May 1609); and was fined once again for not enrolling his apprentice, Mitton, and ‘for giving him a year’ without the Company’s consent (25 February 1612/13). On the same date he presented Thomas Roberts for 7 years. Bad work again incurred a fine (19 May 1615). Robert Suter, late apprentice of Hugh Miller, was turned over to him on 29 March 1622. Henshawe was in receipt of charity on 13 March 1626/7 and his name is not listed in the Quarterage Accounts again after that year.

HICKSON, Robert (fl. 1610-20)

A Plasterer, son of a Lincolnshire yeoman, who was apprenticed to Richard Stephenson for 7 years (19 May 1607). He was turned over to Mr [Robert] Burton (28 November 1605) and freed (9 July 1610). He was fined for: ill work (31 January 1611/12); bad work in divers places (1 September 1615). His beadleship fine was paid on 30 September 1612. The Company recorded unspecified charges re Robert Hickson (3 September 1613). On 23 February 1616/17 he put his mark to the Company memorandum concerning apprentices. He is listed as ‘died’ in the Quarterage Accounts for 1620.

HIGGEN (HIGGIN), William (fl. 1608; d. 1609)

A Plasterer, son of a Staffordshire yeoman, who was apprenticed to William Jackson (6 February 1601) and freed on 29 April 1608, when he agreed to serve one year as journeyman with Widow Margery Jackson. On 13 September 1609 Higgen made his will, leaving the furniture in his lodging in Foxnell Court, Cow Lane, in the parish of St Sepulchre, to Miles Stable, a London Fletcher, to pay off the several sums of money owed to Stable. This comprised his standing feather bedstead, a standing press of wainscot, a wainscot chest, items of brass and pewter and fire irons. To John Griffin, a London Baker, he left his old brown cloak and, somewhat surprisingly, his working pail and brushes, his tray, two trowels and one hammer. Griffin’s wife Elizabeth received 21s, a small trunk and his linen clothing. Any residue was left to Stable, who was also sole executor. The will was proved on 20 December 1609.[24]

HIGGES, Bartholomew (fl. 1591-3)

A Plasterer presented by Rauf Guest, who paid an additional fine ‘to have his apprentice bound 1 yere & a half before his tyme’ (25 July 1583). Higges paid his fines for abling (24 April 1591) and beadleship (28 July 1592). He was fined for ill work in Lothbury on 18 May 1593, the last occasion on which his name appears in Company records.

HIGHWAY, William (fl. 1590)

A plasterer, whose wife Mary was buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 28 April 1590.[25]

HILL, Edmond/Edward (fl. 1604-7)

A Plasterer presented by Richard Allen (23 May 1592) who gained his admission to the freedom on 7 September 1604. According to the Quarterage Accounts, Hill died in 1607 and on 29 January 1609/10 a payment in benevolence was made to Alice, late wife of Edward Hill.

HILL, John (fl. 1549)

One of six plasterers who worked under Patrick Kellie at Westminster Palace in late October and early November 1549.[26]

HILL, Peter (fl. 1601-2)

A Plasterer presented by Raph Bettes (1 February 1593/4), who completed his apprenticeship on 6 February 1600/1 and paid his beadleship fine on 25 July 1601. He donated a gilt spoon with his initials to the Company on 10 September 1602, the last occasion on which his name appeared in the Company records.

HILL, Richard Senior (fl. 1603; d. 1619)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Raph Bettes (21 February 1595/6), who paid his abling fine (11 November 1603). He donated a white [i.e. silver] spoon to the Company in lieu of serving one year as a journeyman (11 August 1604). He presented William Drew (2 May 1608) and on 15 June 1608 Richard Hill Junior, was freed by patrimony. [The wills of Richard senior and of his brother, Walter Hill, suggest that Richard junior was the son of the latter and nephew of Richard senior.] A fine was imposed for ill work in Noble Street on Richard Hill, either senior or junior (3 November 1609). In 1610 Hill Senior was a witness to the nuncupative will of fellow-parishioner William White.[27] He was elected to the Livery (31 July 1612) and paid for his pattern on 7 August 1612. He presented Edward Ridgeway for 8 years (8 August 1616). On 30 April 1619 he was fined for failing to turn over his man, John Daniell, as had been ordered on 4 December 1616. He was fined for bad work at Holborn Bridge with William Bennett (6 November 1616); for bad work in Redcross Street (25 July 1618). Hill was a parishioner of St Stephen Coleman Street, the brother of Walter Hill, who left him his best suit of apparel in his will of 1616. Richard Hill made his final will on 31 July 1619. According to the Custom of London he divided his estate in three parts, leaving one part of his estate to his wife Abigail, another to his children Richard, Helen and Mary. He left 10s each to his brother-in-law John Merowe, Glazier, and John Townson, Glazier. The remainder of his possessions were left to his wife Abigail, who was made executrix. Probate was granted on 9 August 1619.[28] Richard Hill was buried at St Stephen Coleman Street on 6 August 1619 and that event was also recorded by the Company on that date.[29] Widow Hill paid quarterage in 1619 but died in 1620.

HILL, Richard Junior (fl. 1608-13)

A Plasterer who was freed by patrimony on 15 June 1608, probably the son of Walter Hill. A fine was imposed for ill work in Noble Street on Richard Hill, either senior or junior (3 November 1609). According to the Quarterage Accounts, Richard Junior died in 1613 and Widow Hill married away.

HILL, Walter (fl. 1594; d. 1616)

A Citizen and Plasterer of St Stephen Coleman Street, brother of Richard Hill.[30] Raphe Bettes presented him on 10 November 1587 and he was admitted to the Company on 20 February 1594/5. He paid his beadleship fine (2 August 1595) and presented his first apprentice, George Horton, on 28 April 1600. Horton was followed by: James Marsh for 7 years (27 March 1601); Francis Groves (2 May 1608); Hill was fined for having an apprentice turned over to him when he already had one and was not entitled to two (2 September 1608); George Joseph (31 January 1611/12); Matthew Holmes for 8 years (18 November 1612). Hill was one of a number of plasterers accused of intermeddling by the Painter-Stainers’ Company in their suit brought to the Court of Star Chamber in 1594.[31] He is recorded working at St Olave Jewry in July 1600. [32]

He was fined for ill work at St Katharine Creechurch (6 July 1604); for evil work in a house in Moorfields (28 April 1609); for evil work in Carter Lane with William Walters (21 August 1609); for ill work (27 April 1612); for lateness and ill work in the Old Bailey (4 November 1612); for absence (16 June 1613); for ill work at The Star, Coleman Street (6 May 1614); for bad work at The Pie without Aldgate (2 August 1615).

Hill entered the Livery on 7 September 1604. On 4 March 1610/11 Richard Fisher took over from Richard Rawlidge as Junior Warden and paid 40 marks (£26 13s 4d) to do so. This gave rise to a complaint from Walter Hill et al to the Court of Aldermen that there were many Plasterers who had served longer in the Livery than Fisher and on 9 April 1611 the matter was referred to three aldermen for their consideration. On 21 May they reported that Fisher had paid 40 marks to the Master and Wardens to be chosen, which seems to have been regarded as a bribe and resulted in further investigation of the Company’s financial governance. As a result, it was not until 24 September that the decision to replace Fisher with Rawlidge was reached. Fisher was to return to his correct place in the Livery, have his 40 marks returned and to have his extra apprentice transferred to a new master. On 17 October, however, the Court of Aldermen revised their decision, accepting that Fisher had served as Junior Warden properly, despite obtaining the post improperly, and he was allowed to continue as an Assistant and keep his extra apprentice. The Court expressed its continuing disapproval of the corrupt behaviour of the Master and Wardens of the Company.[33] Not surprisingly, Hill was elected Junior Warden on 30 September 1611. On 25 July 1614 Hill was fined 4d ‘for not givinge place when Mr Fisher should have sett downe’ and Fisher was fined the same amount ‘for sitting in a wrong place’.

Hill made his will on 30 December 1615, signing it with his mark. According to the Custom of London, he divided his estate in three parts, leaving one part to his wife Grace, one part to his daughter Godley, and a further £20 to his daughter together with the lease of a series of small tenements in White Lion Alley near Moorgate in London. The third part was to provide legacies of 20s. to the Plasterers’ Company, and the same amount to his maidservant Jane Hill. He left 10s. to Helen, daughter of his brother Richard, and his best suit of apparel to Richard. Hill also left instructions that if his youngest apprentice, Matthew [Holmes], served out the remainder of his apprenticeship under his wife Grace, then he would inherit all of his scaffolding. However, if he failed to serve out his term with his widow, the scaffolding would go to his brother Richard, who was named overseer of the will. Probate was granted on 7 May 1615/16.[34] 

HILL, William (fl. 1601-2)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Nicholas Bolland, who was fined for keeping his boy unbound for more than 6 months (4 November 1592). His abling fine was paid by his master (3 January 1600/1). Hill paid his beadleship fine (18 September 1601) and presented a white [i.e. silver] spoon with his initials to the Company (13 October 1602). Hill appears to have died c 1604, as his name does not appear in the surviving Quarterage Accounts. His son, John, was presented by Walter Elsmore (27 April 1612) but did not complete his apprenticeship.

HINDE (HYNDE), John (fl. 1598; d. 1601)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 14 March 1575/6. While still an apprentice he had been employed by the Royal Works at Greenwich on routine plastering. Between December 1568 and July 1569 he worked a total of 89 days, earning 10d per day.[35] Hinde was fined for disobedience (13 October 1586); but was promoted to the Livery, paying for his pattern on 31 July 1590. He was fined for missing the burial of the wife of one of his fellow-Liverymen (23 June 1592). He was elected to serve as Junior Warden for 1595-6 (15 September 1595) which seems to have resulted in a financial loss as a memorandum recorded that ‘Mr Barfeild [the past Master] hath delivered unto this Court a full accompt of all reckoning whatsoever which can be claymed of him and receaved in the house in monye imposed uppon him and John Hynd for that which cannot be allowed in the Accompt VIli’ (23 December 1596). Hinde was one of the Assistants who put his mark, rather than a signature, to the discharge of a Company bond on the same date. On 11 May 1598 it was ordered ‘that Mr Hynde shall in his owne name sue all persons using the traid of Plasteringe and not having bene bound Apprentice to the same traid’. He was among those making a payment of 10s (14 August 1598) and was fined for absence on Coronation [sic] Day (20 November 1598). He was elected Senior Warden for 1599-1600. He presented several apprentices during his career: Richard Hunt (19 August 1580); John Brigges (10 June 1591); he paid to have John Cruse turned over from John Morrey (11 September 1591); an anonymous apprentice (14 October 1595); Hugh Flood was turned over from Thomas Ancell and Edward Brackley was turned over from Thomas Johnson (28April 1596); Flood was subsequently turned over to Johnson (23 April 1597); Thomas Foote was turned over from John Tyrrell (15 July 1597); an anonymous apprentice (13 October 1597); Christopher Miller was turned over from Henry Bettes (2 August 1599). Hinde was a plasterer assessed at £3 as a householder of St Andrew Holborn in 1598.[36] On 5 March 1601 he made a nuncupative will leaving everything to his wife and executrix, Margaret; the will was proved on 14 March.[37] Edward Brooke’s abling was paid ‘per Mr Hynde’, presumably by his executrix (1 August 1601). Brooke was presumably Hinde’s anonymous apprentice of 1595.

HIPPEY (HEPPE, HIPPIE, HYPPYE), Thomas (fl. 1608-54)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Middlesex yeoman, apprenticed to Henry Brigges for 8 years (6 February 1600/1). He was freed (8 June 1608) and was listed among the Yeomanry, with some gaps, until 1633 (when the Quarterage Accounts cease) . Hippey received charity from the Company on 23 April 1638 and on 23 June 1654 he was nominated to become a pensioner of the Merchant Taylors’ Company charity.

HOARE (HORE), John (fl. 1602; d. 1616)

A Plasterer whose abling fine was paid by Thomas Gower (18 February 1602), so Hoare was presumably the anonymous apprentice presented by Gower on 23 August 1594. He presented the Company with a silver spoon with his initials (10 September 1602) and paid his contribution towards a loan from the City to the King (9 September 1604). His beadleship fine was paid on 25 July 1605. In 1605 Hoare and the Painter-Stainer, Nicholas Southerne, were paid for work at the Dutch Church in Austin Friars.[38] He was fined for evil work with Anthony Sharpe (1 August 1605); for ill work at Foster Lane end (6 May 1614); and bad work in Drury Lane (8 August 1616). He presented the following apprentices: Henry Marshe (13 October 1606); Jarvis Steele (23 June 1607); Giles Taylor (8 June 1608); Robert Archer (17 November 1608). Hoare was allowed another apprentice because it transpired that Taylor had already been apprenticed to another master in the country, to whom he had been returned. On 16 November 1615 he was fined for releasing his man [Robert Archer] one year early. Hoare was listed as a plasterer of St Michael Bassishaw, recorded in the parish registers at the baptisms of twins, William and Susan (5 March 1605/6); of a daughter (6 March 1607); and of a son John (4 April 1613). His own burial took place on 26 August 1616.[39] The administration of his estate was granted to his daughter, Judith Haynes, on 24 September 1616.[40]

HODGEKINS, Thurston (fl. 1571)

A Plasterer fined for disobedience on 2 November 1571.

HOLDIPP (HOLDUP), John (fl. 1610-29)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Hampshire joiner, presented by Robert Burton for 8 years (8 May 1601). He gained his freedom (14 January 1609/10) and paid his beadleship fine (2 August 1615). Holdipp was fined: for ill work at the church in Bishopsgate Street (4 November 1612); for not serving one year as a journeyman (1 September 1615); he was committed (23 April 1616); for bad work in two places in Bishopsgate Street (30 May 1616). Holdipp was able to put his signature to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). His only apprentice was William Cripple, presented for 8 years (1 September 1615). Holdipp was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 13 October 1629.

HOLLAND, John (d. 1605)

A plasterer buried at St Bride Fleet Street on 21 June 1605.[41]                                         

HOLLIAR, Thomas (fl. 1613-25)

A Plasterer, son of a Warwickshire husbandman, who was apprenticed to Thomas Browne for 8 years (1 February 1604/5) and made free on 25 February 1612/13). He presented Rowland Nicholson, son of a Westmorland glover, for 8 years (4 August 1618); John Groobye, son of a Northamptonshire innholder, for 8 years (26 July 1619; turned over to Edmund Lake 11 September 1626; freed 29 May 1627). Holliar was fined for bad work (5 February 1621/2) and was last recorded contributing to a Company assessment on 22 June 1625. He made his will as a parishioner of St Sepulchre on 19 September 1625. £5 was left to his brother-in-law, John Richardson, with the remainder to be divided equally between his brothers, Robert and Nathaniell, and his sister, Wynifrid Richardson. Robert Hollyer was appointed sole executor. Probate was granted on 14 November 1628.[42]

HOLMES, Bartholomew (fl. 1592-1620)

A Plasterer who must have been presented anonymously as he is first recorded paying his abling fine (23 April 1592). Holmes was one of four plasterers working for the Merchant Taylors’ Company on two occasions in August 1594, when he twice received 6s 8d for 5 days’ work at 16d per day.[43] He presented Thomas Henley (8 April 1597); Jenkin Watkins (5 June 1605); Richard Cooper for 7 years (30 September 1612). On 30 May 1616 Holmes was ordered to amend his work by the date of the next Court meeting. His son, John, was made free by patrimony (3 March 1616/17). The Quarterage Accounts record that he died in 1620 and payments continued to be made by Widow Holmes until 1623.

HOLMES, John (fl. 1617-25)

A Plasterer who obtained his freedom by patrimony, as the son of Bartholomew Holmes (3 March 1616/17). Thereafter his name only appears in the Quarterage Accounts, where he is listed from 1617-25.

HOLMES, Matthew (fl. 1620-5)

A Plasterer who was the son of Lambert Holmes of Nassington, Northamptonshire, apprenticed to Walter Hill for 8 years (18 November 1612). He was turned over to Richard Ratcliffe (29 May 1617) and paid his abling fine on 15 March 1619/20. He paid arrearage of quarterage until 23 April 1625.

HOLTE, William (fl. 1601-40)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, recorded in the parish registers on 2 July 1609 at the burial of his wife Eleanor.[44] Holte was apprenticed to Thomas Atkinson (24 July 1594), who paid his abling fine (1 August 1601). Holte donated a white [i.e. silver] spoon to the Company ‘on being made free’ (10 September 1605). In 1614 he was one of the team working under Kelham Roades at the Charterhouse. Between July and October he worked a total of 27½ days at 22d per day, earning a total of £2 10s 5d.[45] He put his mark, rather than a signature, to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). Three apprentices were presented by Holte: Thomas Frye (5 August 1607); William Browne (23 April 1610); Thomas Bedothe [presumably Betaugh] (14 June 1611). Holte was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 22 October 1630 and on 11 September 1640 a payment was made to William Holt, ‘a poore man’.

HOPKINS, Joseph (fl. 1594-6)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Raphe Guest (16 March 1586/7) and paid his abling fine on 28 February 1595/6. He was a parishioner of St Augustine Watling Street, granted licence to marry Elizabeth Kilbie of St Bride Fleet Street by the Bishop of London on 21 February 1593/4.[46] Their daughter was buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 29 September 1594.[47]

HOPPER (HOPAR, HOPPAS), John (fl. 1572; d. 1593)

A Plasterer who presented Randall Clarkson as his apprentice on 16 May 1572. He paid for his pattern for the Livery (14 July 1574 and again 25 July 1582) and contributed towards the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill (March 1580/1). Hopper served as Junior Warden for 1584-5. He put his mark to a memorandum concerning a Company loan (25 March 1586). Subsequent apprentices were: anonymous apprentice (27 February 1578/9); Thomas Johnson II (13 October 1585); anonymous apprentice (27 June 1589); anonymous apprentice turned over to Randall Clarkson (28 November 1589); Henry Greene (26 July 1591; turned over to Edmund Essex from Widow Hopper on 7 March 1597/8). Hopper incurred fines: for misbehaviour (21 October 1574); for ‘supplanting of Richard Briggs his Customer’ (21 October 1575); for disobedience (13 October 1576); an unspecified fine (15 August & 13 October 1577); for evil work with Thomas Turner (9 July 1586); for ill work (14 November 1589). By the terms of James Brigges’ will of 11 June 1591 Hornby inherited ‘The Christopher’ in the parish of St Albans jointly with William Brigges.[48] Together with a number of other plasterers he was employed at St Lawrence Jewry in 1592.[49] Probably the John Hopar of St Stephen Coleman Street whose son, John, was baptised 31 January 1579/80 and his daughter, Frances, 18 August 1588.[50] Hopar made his final will in 1592.  He named his wife Margery executrix and left her a legacy of £5 a year for ten years to bring up their children. He bequeathed legacies of 20s. to his son John and to his daughters, Frances and Jane. The will was witnessed by ‘Mr Betes plasterar’ [probably Raphe Bettes] and ‘Tomas ___ plastar’. Probate was granted on 5 November 1593.[51] Payments were made to Widow Hopper (25 June 1599) and a payment in charity to ‘a poore boy of Hoppers’ (10 September 1602).

HORNBY (HORNBIE), John (fl. 1603-33)

A Plasterer apprenticed to William Evans (2 May 1595) and turned over to Thomas Johnson I (4 June 1596), who paid his abling fine (29 July 1603) and beadleship fine (6 July 1604). He later donated the white silver spoon due to the Company when he was made free (15 September 1606). Hornby’s wife received charity ‘since he is in prison’ (10 & 24 May 1609). He was a parishioner of St Botolph Aldgate, where ‘Mary hornebye daughter to John Hornebye plaisterer in ship Alley’ was baptised on 11 August 1611.[52] Hornby presented the following apprentices: Oliver Mountford (27 August 1608; turned over to Edmond Essex by mutual consent 23 February 1608/9; taken over by Solomon Eaton 4 March 1610/11); George Fernall (previously apprenticed to Solomon Eaton) for 7 years, with the proviso that Hornby ‘shall not turn him over nor enter into any fraudulent covenant, at risk of having no further apprentices’ (18 November 1612). Hornby’s man [presumably Fernall] was committed (25 January 1615/16). Hornby followed him there (27 May 1616) and was fined for disobedience (30 May 1616). He is last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 25 July 1633.

HORTON, Thomas (fl. 1596)

A plasterer whose son Giles was baptised at St Giles Cripplegate on 24 February 1595/6.[53]

HOTHERSOLE (HEATHERSOLE, HETHERSELL, HITHERSOLE, HOTHERSALL, OTHERSOULD, UTHERSOULE), Thomas (fl. 1609; d. 1638)

A Plasterer who was the son of a London gardener, presented by Thomas Ancell for 9 years (23 April 1601) but who had his term reduced by one year and was freed on 24 May 1609. He paid his beadleship fine (30 July 1613). He presented William Pitten, son of a Devon yeoman, for 7 years, when he also paid fines for not serving one year as a journeyman and ‘for binding a boy out of the Hall’ (12 August 1614). He had not presented Edward Davies II, when the latter was turned over as Hothersole’s apprentice to Robert Saunders; on the same day he presented Steven Crippes, son of a Hampshire yeoman, for 8 years (27 May 1616); Richard Browne III for 8 years (25 January 1620; Hothersole was fined for freeing him before his full term on 2 December 1628); Stephen Chandler, son of a Hertfordshire painter-stainer, for 7 years (30 November 1627); George Yorke for 8 years (23 April 1628; dismissed from his indenture for having married 22 March 1632/33); John Doorne of Kent for 8 years (25 July 1631); John Hobdale, son of a Worcestershire butcher, for 7 years (25 January 1632-3; freed 20 May 1640); Thomas Lane, son of a Norfolk tailor, for 7 years (23 April 1636); John King/Kinsman, son of a Huntingdonshire husbandman, for 8 years (13 October 1637; as the apprentice of Hethersole, deceased, he was turned over to John Stephens on 14 March 1637/8). Hothersole was fined twice for bad work and for abusing the Company (13 January 1614/15); for bad work in Bishopsgate Street and St Sither Lane (9 September 1618); for bad work in Dunning Court, Bishopsgate Street (8 November 1627); for bad work at The Sun and Moon without Cripplegate (30 April 1628); for bad work in Bishops Street (1 August 1628); for evil words against John Walter (25 July 1629).

As a parishioner of St Botolph Bishopsgate he was granted a licence to marry Margery Lane of St Mary Colechurch by the Bishop of London on 11 December 1620.[54] Hothersole was one of the creditors of his ex-master Thomas Ancell, whose will gave him the administration of the estate valued at £7 14s 10d when Ancell died in 1622. Hothersole was admitted to the Livery (5 September 1621) but was dismissed for making Edward Davies II free without him having been his apprentice (14 November 1623). However, a memorandum of 11 February 1625 recorded his readmission to the Livery as he had been dismissed unjustly and he was elected Junior Warden for 1627-8 (10 September 1627). He made his mark as a witness to a memorandum about a Company bond (4 January 1627/8). On 7 May 1630 Hothersole admitted his guilt in taking taskwork from a carpenter and a bricklayer; but refused to pay the fine and was dismissed as an Assistant. He was readmitted to the Livery when he paid the outstanding fines (26 July 1630) but stood unsuccessfully in the election for Senior Warden (13 September 1630). He was chosen as Senior Warden for 1631-2 (12 September 1631); but was dismissed as an Assistant again ‘until he cleared himself of charges made against him concerning the Company and his man’ (14 February 1632/3). Hothersole made his will on 28 September 1636. To his son, George, he left his stuff suit of apparel, a grey cloak and 20s. The residue of the estate was bequeathed to his wife and sole executrix, Margaret. Probate was granted on 25 January 1638.[55]

HOWARD, Peter (fl. 1620)

A plasterer paid for work at St Matthew Friday Street in 1620.[56]

HOWELL, Fulke (fl. 1594; d. 1597)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Robert Plowman on 23 April 1584/5. His freedom went unrecorded but 1594 seems a likely date as Plowman presented another apprentice in April of that year. John Soarwood was apprenticed to Howell (24 May 1594) and on 9 August that year Howell paid for his pattern for the Livery. On 3 September 1596 the Court of Assistants settled a long-running dispute between Plowman and Howell, with a suspended fine to be paid for any further recurrence by either party. The signatures of both men confirmed this agreement; the last occasion on which Howell’s name appeared in the Company records. As a Citizen and Plasterer of Bridewell, Howell made his final will on 26 January 1596/7. He left £10 to his cousin Alice ap Hughes, money that was put in trust with John Jeweller of Bridewell, Fletcher. He left £10 to Mary and Elizabeth, his brother’s daughters; and the same amount to his brother Henry. He gave the poor of Bridewell 6s. 8d, and forgave his brother-in-law, George Heyes, all his debts. He named his wife, Anne, executor and his neighbour, John Jeweller, overseer. Probate was granted on 15 February 1596/7.[57]

HOWSE, Richard (fl. 1607)

A plasterer paid by the Merchant Taylors’ Company in 1607; one of the team ‘beautyfying’ their hall prior to a royal visit.[58]

HUBBARD (HOBART, HOBBART, HOBERT, HUBBART, HUBBERD), John (fl. 1620; d. between 17 December 1655 and 9 January 1656)

A Plasterer, son of a Leicestershire fellmonger, who was apprenticed to Thomas Bailey for 8 years (3 June 1613). While still an apprentice he worked at the Charterhouse for 3 days in September-October 1614, earning 5s at 20d per day.[59] He was freed as the apprentice of Widow Bailey (29 June 1620), paid a fine for being freed early (13 October 1620) and another for not serving his beadleship (2 May 1622). On 11 May 1629 he signed his name on admittance to the Livery, made a gift to the Company of £3 and paid for his ‘patterne of cloth’. He made a further gift of £2 towards the cost of rebuilding the Company property destroyed by fire (9 September 1631). Hubbard was elected Junior Warden for 1637-8 (11 September 1637) but was dismissed on 15 February 1637/8, for the time being for signing a certificate for ‘a new intended project for lyme’ which was opposed by the Company as prejudicial to Company members and the commonwealth. His dismissal was confirmed as final on 14 March 1637/8 as he had failed to attend the Court to answer the charges against him and was continuing to support Sir William Middleton’s project. Nevertheless, Hubbard stood (unsuccessfully) in the election for Senior Warden (14 September 1640) but was chosen the following year to serve for 1641-2 (13 September 1641). On 9 May 1643 the Company sold its old armour and Mr Hubberd’s armour was ‘trimmed up’. Hubbard failed to be elected Master for 1644-5 (26 August 1644) but on 23 September it was recorded that John Walters (the newly-elected Master) was absent in Scotland and Hubbard was chosen Master in his place. Thomas, son of Robert Terrey, was freed by patrimony on the testimony of John Hubbard and William Betaugh (10 October 1645). Hubbard was paid interest on a loan of £50 he had made to the Company (15 January 1645/6; 30 September 1647; 11 January 1647/8; 24 April 1648; 24 January 1648/9). On 18 December 1650 he signed a note that he had been repaid £25 of the loan. He supported the request of William Whiting to be dismissed from the Court of Assistants on the grounds of age and weakness (4 August 1649). On 23 June 1654 he was one of the signatories accepting the need for an assessment to be levied to rescue the Company from debt.

Numerous apprentices were presented by him: John Salt, son of a Leicestershire vintner, for 7 years (14 September 1626); Richard Newman was turned over to him from Richard Dewberry (26 July 1630; freed 26 August 1636); Francis Wilson, son of a Cumberland yeoman, for 7 years (26 July 1641; freed 8 August 1648); Robert Balle was turned over to him from Ralph Lacy (30 October 1643); Hugh Haynes (freed 5 December 1644; no record of presentation); Thomas Bradley, son of a Middlesex grazier (25 January 1644/5; he ran away May 1645); Gilbert Alwinckle was turned over from Nathaniel Kymnell (4 August 1645; freed 18 May 1649); Thomas Traselove, son of a London Merchant Taylor, for 8 years (29 June 1648); John Richardson, son of a Northamptonshire ‘Agrecolter’, for 7 years (18 May 1649; freed 5 June 1656); Thomas King, son of a Cook from Norton Folgate, Middlesex, for 7 years (26 February 1654/5). Hubbard was fined for: bad work in Soper Lane (30 November 1627); bad work (30 April 1629; 11 May 1637; 7 November 1639; 3 February 1641/2; 5 September 1651); freeing his apprentice one year early (5 December 1644); unspecified (23 April 1649).

Hubbard made his will on 17 December 1655 and it was proved on 9 January 1655/6.[60] He left £5 to be spent on bread for the poor of Norton Folgate, where he lived. To his brother George, he left the money that he had already lent him and the lease of the four messauages or tenements in Long Alley where George was living as a tenant. Other properties were left to his widowed sister ‘in respecte of her Long and great paynes she hath taken with me in the Tyme of my sicknesse, earnestlie desireing her not to leaue me vntill she see me buried’; and to John, his young nephew and godson, son of his deceased brother Richard, he left an unspecified amount that had been used to purchase property in Leicestershire, when John reached the age of twenty-one. 40s apiece was left to: another sister; his friend William Biddough; the overseers of his will, John Dashwood, a London Brewer, and Augustine Hemminge, a Gentleman of the hamlet of Spitalfields in the parish of Stepney, Middlesex. All his wearing apparel was to go to his brother George, except a brown cloth cloak that belonged to their brother, Richard; and ‘my Cloth Gowne lined with Bayes which I vsed to sitt in att the Hall’ which was bequeathed to his fellow-Plasterer, William Whiting.

HUGHES, Philip (fl. 1613-45)

A Plasterer, son of a Monmouthshire husbandman, presented by Thomas Hayes for 8 years (6 July 1604). He was turned over to Ellis Piggen (8 December 1609), made free but ‘committed for not coming in to be made free’ (26 March 1613). He paid his beadleship fine (1 September 1615) and continued to pay his dues; but otherwise seems to have played little part in Company affairs until he donated 5s towards the cost of rebuilding the Company’s corner house (13 October 1631). An apprentice, George Curtis, son of a Northamptonshire yeoman, was presented for 8 years (25 July 1627; freed 11 August 1635). Robert Farey, son of a Northamptonshire husbandman, was apprenticed for 7 years (24 April 1637; freed 20 June 1645).

HUMFREY (HUMFRIES, HUMFRIS, HUMFRYE, HUMPHREYS), John (fl. 1589-1629)

A Plasterer who was presented by Richard Ratcliffe (26 May 1581) and paid his abling fine (31 January 1588/9) and beadleship fine (31 July 1590). In 1599-1600 he was paid £4 by the Grocers’ Company for ‘repayring the turrett windows and for new whiting and coloring of the owtside of the parlour and newe howse in the garden according to agrement’.[61] On 26 July 1601 Humfrey made a final payment of money owed to the Company. He paid in instalments to be allowed a journeyman and an apprentice (18 September 1601) and for his pattern for the Livery (6 August 1608). However, on 1 September 1615 it was recorded that Humfrey ‘did consent and agree to be putt off from the Lyvery’ and he returned to the Yeomanry for the remainder of his career. He signed his name to the Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). On 8 December 1629 the Company gave 2s 6d to ‘John Humfries man beinge a souldier for his passage into the countrie’. Humfrey presented several apprentices: Henry Mitson (24 July 1594); Richard Greenhill (6 February 1600/1), when he also made a donation for the goodwill of the Company; John Ford (29 April 1608); Robert Walstone (4 March 1610/11); William Smith was turned over to him from Thomas Noden (30 May 1616); Robert Mathewes, son of an Oxfordshire bricklayer, for 7 years (6 March 1625/6;  turned over to William Bennett 4 February 1629/30; freed 18 July 1633); Robert Midwinter, son of a deceased Gloucestershire yeoman, for 9 years (1 August 1627; turned over to Edmond Lake 22 March 1632/3; discharged as a runaway 8 March 1635/6). Humfrey incurred fines for: ill work in Coleman Street (10 September 1599); ill work in St Martin’s Lane (29 January 1601/2); absence from a burial (31 January 1611/12); ill work at Whittington College [a property of the Mercers’ Company] and for taking work of a carpenter (30 July 1613); bad work in Ivy Lane (11 November 1613); absence (4 November 1620). Widow Humfrey paid quarterage in 1632 and was granted a quarterly pension of 2s 6d on 13 October 1632.

HUNTER, John (fl. 1577-1605)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 8 November 1577. He made a donation for the poor (25 January 1579/80) and paid his contribution towards the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill concerning artificers (March 1580/1). He was taken to the Compter on 8 May 1590 and fined for lateness (25 January 1590/1). Hunter was a resident of St Andrew Holborn where he died. His will was proved in July 1605, leaving a widow Anne and children, William, Richard and Michael. The administration of the estate, valued at £18 4s 8d, was granted to the widow during the minority of the children.[62]

HUNTINGTON, John (fl. 1607; died 1619)

A Plasterer, the son of John, a Cumberland yeoman, presented by Richard Terry for 8 years (13 October 1600). On 16 November 1607 he was admitted and promised a silver spoon to the Company. As a member of the Yeomanry he contributed 2s 6d towards the cost of the Company’s suit in Chancery concerning its corner house in Wood Street (2 February 1608/9). He was fined for: binding an apprentice contrary to Company orders (24 May 1609); his beadleship and ill work in three places (31 August 1609); Humphrey Thorneycroft was turned over to him from Thomas Turner (21 August 1609) and Huntington was fined for releasing him one year early (27 May 1616). On the same date, he presented John Slye, son of a Warwickshire husbandman, for 8 years, who was returned to him by Robert Scolthroppe (7 November 1617) but not freed. Huntington was fined for bad work in the Spital (29 August 1617). He presented William Browne, from Cumberland, for 8 years (29 April 1618); Robert Huntington for 8 years (3 November 1619). His widow, Abigail, paid quarterage from 1620-28.

HUNTINGTON, Robert (fl. 1626-38)

A Plasterer, the son of John, a Cumberland yeoman, who was presented by John Huntington, possibly a relative, for 8 years (3 November 1619). He was freed on 7 November 1626 but did not pay his beadleship fine until 25 July 1632. He was nominated, but not selected, for the Livery (18 July 1633). Fines were incurred for: bad work at Paul’s Wharf (7 May 1630) and bad work (6 September 1632). His apprentices were: John Jackson, son of a Cumberland husbandman, apprenticed to him for 8 years (25 January 1633/4); William Sharpe, son of a Wiltshire carpenter, deceased, apprenticed for 7 years (11 May 1637); Nicholas Feazey, son of a Huntingdonshire brasier, deceased, apprenticed for 7 years (14 March 1637/8; turned over to Robert Langley 3 September 1639; freed 1 May 1645).

HURLESTON, Henry/Humfrey (fl. 1604-32)

A Plasterer freed by patrimony on 3 February 1603/4 but who does not appear to have been resident in the City. His only apprentice was William Read (23 April 1612). Hurleston was elected to the Livery (31 July 1612). On 25 July 1614 it was decided to give a piece of plate, worth between £5 and £6, to ‘Mr Dr [sic] Baylie, Mr Hurleston’s friend’ in recognition of his great pains on the Company’s behalf at my Lord Cooke’s. Hurleston paid again for his livery pattern (13 October 1618). The Beadle was paid ‘for goeing to Mr Hurleston’ (8 May 1623) and the Company was at some expense ‘when wee went to Tooting to Mr Hurlestone’s howse’ (23 April 1625). This was repeated ‘in goeing to Mr Hurlestone to Toting’ (18 September 1629) and again when the Beadle went to Mr Hurlston (25 July 1632). He was elected Junior Warden for 1632-3 (10 September 1632); but turned down the position on the grounds that ‘his occasons weare so great that he could not intend to performe his service accordinge to his eleccon ...’, and paid his fine, having handed the money over to Mr William Widmore (14 and 29 September 1632). The Quarterage Accounts recorded his death in 1632.

HURLESTON (HAWLESTON), John (fl. 1572-76)

A Plasterer who paid an unspecified fine on 27 June 1572 and his beadleship fine on 8 August 1573. He presented Thomas Russell (29 July 1575) and was fined for absence (17 February 1575/6) but it was ‘Widow Hawleston’ who paid quarterage on 12 September 1579.

HUTWITCH, (HUTWAY, HUTWITH), William (fl. 1615-28)

A Plasterer who was presented by John Shambrooke, who was fined for keeping an apprentice contrary to Company ordinances (26 March 1607). While still an apprentice Hutwitch worked at the Charterhouse as one of Kelham Roades’ team, earning 10s for 6 days’ work in August-September 1614, at the lowest rate of 20d per day.[63] When he was freed, Shambrooke was again fined for not enrolling his man in due time (3 May 1615). Hutwitch put his mark to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). He is last recorded in the Court minutes on 4 September 1623 as having paid arrearage of quarterage on 23 April that year. His name continued to appear in the Quarterage Accounts until 1628.


[1] The Records of the Honorable Society of Lincoln’s Inn. The Black Books. Vol. I, From AD 1422 to AD 1586, Lincoln’s Inn (1897), Appendix 1. Building costs of Lincoln’s Inn, 26th March 1567 to 26th June 1568.

[2] George J Armytage (ed), Allegations for Marriage Licences issued by the Bishop of London, 1611 to 1828, Vol II,  extracted by Col. Joseph Lemuel Chester, Harleian Society, 26 (1887), p. 56.

[3] George J Armytage (ed), Allegations for Marriage Licences issued by the Bishop of London, 1520 to 1610, Vol I, extracted by Col. Joseph Lemuel Chester, Harleian Society, 25 (1887), p. 181.

[4] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48.

[5] TNA E 36/235, pp. 232 and 317; E 36/237, ff. 806 and 850.

[6] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/11, f. 206v. The will was proved on 17 December 1547.

[7] LMA CLC/L/BA/D/001/MS 05174/002.

[8] LMA CLC/L/CC/D/002/MS 04326/003.

[9] R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 and 1582, London Record Society, 29 (1993), p. 268.

[10] LMA P69/DUN2/A/001/MS 10342.

[11] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 244v, 253r.

[12] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 212v, 220v.

[13] R G Lang (ed), Two Tudor Subsidy Assessment Rolls for the City of London: 1541 & 1582,  London Record Society, 29 (1993).

[14] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[15] Northumberland Estates Archive: U.I.8b, ‘A Booke of Dissbursements for workes done att Sion; beginning the 4th of Aprill 1605’, transcribed by Dr Ed Town, p.7.

[16] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[17] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[18] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/016C.

[19] Mercers’ Company Archive, Renter Wardens’ Accounts 1577–1603, f. 148r.

[20] LMA CLC/429/MS 03555/003, Bundle 8, No. 3: Copies of Plaisterers’ Company documents made in the 19th century.

[21] LMA DL/C/B/007/MS 09172/043, will no. 230.

[22] LMA P69/TRI3/B/004/MS 04835/002, ff. 71r, 72r, 72v, 74r.   

[23] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/300/009.

[24] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/021, f. 210.

[25] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[26] TNA E 101/474/19.

[27] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/021, f. 304.

[28] LMA DL/C/B/007/MS 09172/031, numbered for digitization 20.

[29] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[30] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[31] TNA STAC/5/P52/15.

[32] LMA P69/OLA2/B/004/MS 04409/001, f. 42v.

[33] LMA COL/CA/01/033, ff. 97v, 112v, 116v-17, 179v-180, 200v-201.

[34] LMA DL/CB/005/MS 09172/028, No. 247.

[35] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c., ff. 95v, 106v, 114v, 120v, 130v.

[36] TNA E 179/146/369.

[37] LMA DL/AL/C/001/MS 09051/005, f. 178r.

[38] LMA CLC/180/MS 07402/07.

[39] A W Hughes Clarke (ed), The Registers of St. Mary Magdalen Milk Street 1558-1666 and St. Michael Bassishaw London 1538-1625, Harleian Society, 72 (1942).

[40] LMA DL/AL/C/001/MS 09050/005, f. 67.

[41] LMA P69/BRI/A/004/MS 06538.

[42] LMA DL/C/B/005/MS 09172/038, will no. 293.

[43] LMA CLC/L/MD/G/243/MS 34348, ff. 63r and 64r.

[44] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[45] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48, pp. 7-8.

[46] George J Armytage (ed), Allegations for Marriage Licences issued by the Bishop of London, 1520 to 1610, extracted by Col. Joseph Lemuel Chester, Harleian Society, 25-26 (1887), 708.

[47] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[48] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/014E.

[49] LMA P69/LAW1/B/008/MS 02593/001.

[50] LMA P69/STE1/A/002/MS 04449/001.

[51] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/016D, No. 5.

[52] LMA P69/BOT2/A/001/MS 09220.

[53] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[54] George J Armytage (ed), Allegations for Marriage Licences issued by the Bishop of London, 1520 to 1610, extracted by Col. Joseph Lemuel Chester, Harleian Society, 25-26 (1887), 714.

[55] LMA DL/C/B/007/MS 09712; will no. 21.

[56] LMA P69/MTW/B/005/MS 01016/00, f. 142v.

[57] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/018A, numbered for digitization 44.

[58] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[59] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48.

[60] TNA PROB 11/252.

[61] LMA CLC/L/GH/D/001/MS 11571/008.

[62] LMA DL/AL/C/001/MS 09050/004, f. 292v.

[63] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48.