Gazetteer of Plasterers - I to J

IVERS, Edward (fl. 1549)

One of six plasterers who worked under Patrick Kellie at Westminster Palace in late October and early November 1549.[1]

JACKSON, Amos (fl. 1621-62)

A Plasterer, son of a Huntingdonshire butcher, who was presented by Hugh Miller for 8 years (30 June 1615). He paid his abling fine (20 July 1622) and made a free gift to the Company (14 November 1623). A further donation of 2s 6d followed on 23 April 1624. His beadleship fine was paid on 18 August 1628. Despite a long career, Jackson’s apprentices were not numerous: Richard Hiatt from Oxfordshire for 7 years (25 July 1627); on 4 February 1629/30 the Company laid out money ‘about Amyas Jackson and his man’ and on 16 November 1630 Hiatt was turned over to Richard Cooper for the remainder of his term. John Naylor, apprentice of Richard Fisher, was turned over to him (12 September 1621); John Thorne, son of a Berkshire yeoman, apprenticed himself (13 October 1634). Jackson was employed in the Royal Works over many decades. In 1633-4 he was working together with Roger Morley on the interior and exterior of the Queen’s and other lodgings at Somerset House, including lathing and laying a wall that was then ‘drawn into Ashler’. For all their taskwork they received a total of £8 3s 1d.[2] On his own account he worked in the ‘Fryers Lodgings’ there, earning £3 8s 6d.[3] He worked in partnership with James Kipling at the Old Palace of Westminster in 1634-5, where their work in the Queen’s Court, over the Court of Requests, earned them £22 3s 2d.[4] Returning to Somerset House in 1638-9 Jackson plastered the walls and ceiling of the Queen’s Master Cook’s room for £3 19s 11d.[5] Jackson continued to pay arrearage of quarterage throughout the 1650s, until he was admitted as a Company pensioner on 25 January 1658/9. Nevertheless, he was pressed into work once again following the Restoration, when many of the royal palaces were in need of refurbishment. From June-November 1660 he was one of the large team working under John Grove at Whitehall.[6] In April 1661 he was helping to prepare the Palace of Westminster for the coronation and from May-August he was carrying out routine plastering at St James’s Palace.[7] Jackson returned to Whitehall for work in a variety of lodgings from July-November 1662.[8]

JACKSON, Edward (fl. 1567; d. 1585)

A Plasterer who was one of those accused by the Painter-Stainer John Cooper of ‘intermeddling’ at the Court of the King’s Remembrancer in 1567.[9] Jackson’s name first appears in the Company records when he was fined for disobedience on 6 November 1573. He paid for his pattern for the Livery (14 July 1574) and was Junior Warden for 1574-5; but was promoted to Senior Warden on 25 March 1575, following the death of the incumbent, Henry Watson. He served again as Junior Warden for 1580-81 (28 July 1581) and was elected Senior Warden for 1583-4 (11 September 1583) and 1584-5 (13 October 1584). His four apprentices were: anonymous (17 August 1576); Nicholas Ben (25 July 1578); William Ashe (20 November 1579); and anonymous (6 April 1582). Jackson paid an unspecified fine (15 August 1577) and was fined for bad work (12 September 1579). Jackson’s final will was made on 20 August 1585.[10] He asked to be buried in his parish of St Nicholas Olave. He left all of his possessions to his sons, William (eldest son) and William (youngest son), and to his daughters, Alice and Elizabeth, both unmarried. Jackson named his children as overseers and his friends Robert Chambers and Nicholas Wilson as executors. Richard Benson, John Jackson, and John Adams witnessed the will. Probate was granted on 28 August 1585.

JACKSON, John I (fl. 1571-1603)

A Plasterer who is first recorded paying his beadleship fine (1 September 1571). He paid for his pattern for the Livery and its renewal (4 June 1574 and 25 July 1582) and was once fined for coming to the Hall in his cloak (4 February 1574/5). An unspecified fine of 12d was levied (13 October 1577) and bad work incurred further fines; unspecified (19 August 1580); by Leadenhall (24 November 1581); unspecified (4 July 1582); unspecified (29 November 1598; 9 November 1599). He was a contributor to the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill (Court Day, March 1580/1) and put his mark to the loan agreement made between the Company and Ralph Bettes (25 March 1586) and to its discharge (23 December 1596). His servant, George Mackerel, was buried at St Gregory by Paul on 17 August 1593.[11] This would suggest that he was the same John Jackson who married Margery Shaw on 4 December 1580 and whose servant Elizabeth Jackson was buried on 24 August at the church that same year. Likewise it is likely that the records of the baptisms of Daniel (5 November 1581); Rebecca (9 June 1583); John (19 July 1584); Anne (3 July 1586); Mary (22 June 1589); Joane (19 March 1591/2) and Elizabeth (7 January 1587/8) and the burial of John (25 August 1593) relate to his children.

Jackson served as Junior Warden for 1585-6, as Senior Warden for 1593-4 and as Master for 1596-7 and 1602-3. At the Court Day held on 12 August 1597 Mr Jackson began by asking the Assistants whether they knew of any faults committed by their fellows, so that they ‘might be fyrst reformed’, which led to allegations against Rafe Bettes and Edmund Essex. Jackson was the master of numerous apprentices: William Austen (30 April 1574); Raffe Short (28 November 1575); Thomas Warren (13 October 1579); Nicholas Henshawe (12 September 1586); John Rowlidge (28 July 1587); John Hunter (30 August 1588); anonymous (8 December 1592); Abraham Parnell (1 February 1593/4); Henry Law (previously apprenticed to Robert Garsett) was turned over to Randall Clarkson (8 November 1594); Christopher Moore (17 March 1594/5); Thomas Askall was transferred to Jackson after his master died (11 May 1598) but Jackson was reimbursed when Askall ‘departed from him’ (30 November 1599); Walter Elsmore was turned over to him from George Mason (28 April 1600); Edward Smyth, son of a Lancashire yeoman, for 8 years (1 August 1601); Edmund Cartwright, son of a Gloucestershire yeoman, for 8 years (25 March 1602); Joseph Keweson, son of a Lincolnshire mason, for 8 years (21 August 1602); Jerome Assell, son of a Staffordshire yeoman, for 8 years (25 April 1603). Jackson’s name last appeared in the Court Minute Book when Walter Elsmore’s abling fine was paid ‘per Mr Jackson’ on 7 December 1603.

JACKSON, John II (fl. 1618-45)

A Plasterer who had been apprenticed to, but not presented by, Richard Browne I, and was turned over to his widowed mother, Margery Jackson, to serve the rest of his term (3 November 1609). John II would therefore seem to be the son of John I. He paid his abling fine (2 September 1618) and took Thomas Anderson, son of an Essex husbandman, as his apprentice for 8 years (23 April 1632). Anderson was presented again for 8 years by Clement Kellie on 25 July 1632. Jackson was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 25 July 1645.

JACKSON, Richard (fl. 1580)

A Plasterer who was fined for bad work on 29 April 1580.

JACKSON, William I (fl. 1574-1608)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 14 July 1574. He was fined for ill work at Guildhall Gate (12 December 1600) and was paid £7 2s. 11d. by St Lawrence Jewry for ‘work and stuff’ in 1603-04.[12] Jackson presented his first and only apprentice, William Higgen, son of a Staffordshire yeoman, for 8 years on 6 February 1600/01, when he was fined for keeping his boy unbound for six months. When Higgen was freed on 29 April 1608 he agreed to serve one year as a journeyman with Widow Margery Jackson, which suggests that William was a relative.

JACKSON, William II (fl. 1596)

A Plasterer who was presented by John Walfleet on 31 January 1588/9. When he paid his abling fine on 21 February 1595/6 it was ordered that ‘he shall receave of his master John Walflett for one wholl yeare which he hath condiconed to serve his master 53s 4d.’

JAMES, Richard (fl. 1624-60)

A Plasterer, son of a Berkshire weaver, presented by Stephen Bricknell for 7 years (13 October 1617), who paid his abling fine on 26 November 1624. His beadleship fine was paid on 1 September 1628. His apprentice, John Jennings, was also the son of a Berkshire weaver, presented for 8 years (17 June 1630; inexplicably, James was fined for freeing his man early on 21 February 1638/9). On 9 August 1631 James paid 7s in fines for taking work of a bricklayer and as a donation to the cost of the Company’s ‘newe builded house’. A charitable payment was made to his wife (6 November 1637). James’s son, Henry, was freed by patrimony (10 February 1651/2). James presented William Ludford, son of a Leicestershire yeoman, for 7 years (25 January 1565/7). In July and August 1660 he was employed by the Royal Works at Somerset House, working with others in refurbishing the royal lodgings.[13]

JARVIS (JERVICE, JERVIS), Richard (fl. 1620-51)

A Plasterer, son of a Cornish gentleman, who was presented by John Pritchard for 8 years (26 March 1613). He was turned over to Mr [Richard] Ratcliffe (18 May 1620) and paid his abling fine on 4 November 1620. His beadleship fine followed on 22 June 1629. Jarvis continued to pay arrearage of quarterage and on 20 September 1650 he was among those summoned to attend the Master and Wardens on the next Search Day. Robert Ibbott, a previously unrecorded apprentice of Thomas Dodd, was turned over to him (18 December 1650). His name last appears on the list of those nominated for the Livery on 17 February 1650/1; but Jarvis was not selected.

JEFFEREY, John (fl. 1613-14)

A plasterer working as part of the team employed at the Charterhouse in 1613 and 1614. He was paid at the lowest rate of 18d in October-November 1613, earning 21s for 14 days’ work. He was paid at the same rate for 1½ days in April-May 1614 (2s 3d) but was promoted to 20d for the 6 days he worked during the same period (10s); and for the 31 days he worked between May and July 1614 (51s 8d), totalling £4 4s 11d.

JENKES (JENCKES), Edward (fl. 1617-62)

A Plasterer presented by Ellis Piggen (30 April 1610), who obtained permission to release him six months early (13 October 1617). Jenkes paid his fines for his abling and freedom but was also fined ‘for not enrolling himself’ (7 November 1617). His beadleship fine followed on 9 September 1618 and he was once fined for absence (20 November 1628). His sons were freed by patrimony: Ellis on 4 November 1647 and Nicholas on 23 April 1656. Jenkes paid arrearage of quarterage throughout his career, last recorded on 29 August 1662.

JOHNSON, Ellis (fl. 1583-94)

A Plasterer who was presented by John Mondelowe (13 October 1573) and was turned over to Richard Johnson on payment of 2s (30 March 1579). His freedom was not recorded but must have taken place before 13 October 1583 when he paid arrearage of quarterage. Johnson presented his own apprentice, John Slared, on 9 July 1586. He was fined for disobedience (10 March 1587) and for ill work at Lewsam [?Lewisham] (3 November 1587). On 31 July 1590 he paid for his pattern for the Livery. When Slared was freed, Johnson presented an anonymous apprentice and was fined for keeping a boy above six months (27 July 1593). In 1593-4 he was employed by the Royal Works at Woking, where he and John Allen were plastering and ‘drawing with stonewoorke Joyntes all the syde of the house towardes the garden, with a Retourne & a highe turrett 50 ft highe towardes the Ryver’. This involved a vast amount of plastering and they were paid extra for scaffolding, bringing the total to £54 18s.[14] Johnson was last recorded in the Court Minute Book when he was fined for ill work on 5 April 1594.

JOHNSON, John (fl. 1566; d. 1578)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 17 February 1575/6. He was fined for bad work on 15 February 1576/7 and was last recorded paying his beadleship fine on 23 April 1578. While still an apprentice he was twice paid for work for the Drapers’ Company. He was working with Thomas Johnson, as his labourer, in 1567-68 at several of the company’s tenements in the Vintry; and in 1568-69 he was one of the team employed at Mr Dummer’s in Bassishaw, where he was paid at the lowest rate of 9d per day for three days but 12d per day for another 20 days.[15] He was buried at St Vedast Foster Lane on 8 October 1578.[16]

JOHNSON, Percy (fl. 1559)

A plasterer employed at the Royal Mews in Westminster in 1559.[17] 

JOHNSON, Richard (fl. 1570; d. 1596)

A Plasterer who, while still an apprentice, was paid for 8½ days’ work as one of the team led by John Thomas at the Church of St Alphage Cripplegate between 7 December 1569 and 17 December 1570, earning a total of 9s 11d.[18] He paid his abling and admission fines on 17 February 1575/6. The event appears to have been celebrated as the Company also spent money ‘at Mr Hands at the making free of Richard Johnson’. He paid his beadleship fine on 15 August 1577 and on 30 March 1579 he paid 2s for the return of Ellis Johnson from John Mondelowe. Another apprentice, John Fletcher I, was presented on 29 April 1580. Johnson was one of those contributing towards the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill ‘tuching artificers’ (Court Day, March 1580/1). William Piggen was fined for entering into work where Richard Johnson had money owing him (26 May 1581). Johnson was fined for disobedience (7 August 1584) but was one of those paying for his pattern on being chosen to enter the Livery (10 September 1585). Faulty work incurred a fine (3 December 1585), as did contempt and assault (29 July 1586). When he refused to pay this fine it was decided that he should be ‘put from the clothing’ (16 November 1586). Nevertheless, he was elected Junior Warden for 1590-91 (13 September 1590). His next apprentice was Robert Storey, presented 11 October 1590, followed by John Hounsted (11 November 1591; died 1593, see below). On 24 May 1594 Johnson was in trouble again and was sent to prison, following evil speech at the Court meeting. He was free by 24 July 1594, when he presented Edward Brooke; but does not seem to have learnt his lesson, as he was fined again for ‘ill demeanour’ towards the Company (2 August 1594).

Johnson was a parishioner of St Clement Eastcheap where he was recorded in the parish registers at the burial of his servant John Hounsted/Ownsted on 21 Nov 1593.[19] Johnson made his final will on 30 July 1596.[20] He left £150 each to his eldest daughter Thomazine and his youngest daughter Katherine, which they were to receive when they reached their majority. His wife Alice was named executrix. He made bequests of £7 to his kinswoman Frances Brigges; £3 to Elizabeth Brigges, her sister; 40s to Isabell Brigges; £5 to James Redman; 30s to the Livery of the Company of Plasterers and a further 40s for drinks at his funeral. He left 40s to Bennett Brigges, daughter of Henry Brigges; 20s to his apprentices Robert Storey and Edward Brooke. He left £5 to Elizabeth Brooke, the daughter of Edward Brooke, a Goldsmith, and named Simon Leverett, Butcher, and James Leverett, his brother, as overseers, leaving them 30s each. Johnson was buried on 6 August 1596 and the will proved on 1 September 1596.

JOHNSON, Robert (fl. 1563-1582)

A Plasterer who, like Thomas Johnson I, had been apprenticed to Robert Sheppard and who, ‘as sometime my servant’, was a beneficiary under his ex-master’s will of 1576. He received 20s and his son, Robert, 10s.[21] Robert was employed both on his own and with Thomas Johnson by the Drapers’ Company on several occasions. In 1563-64 they worked together at William Bugge’s house in Lothbury for one day for 1s each; and Robert earned 2s on his own account at Drapers’ Hall for two days’ work repairing the south gable end in the hall and the north gable end of the parlour.[22] For another day’s work in 1565-65 on the walls of Thomas Wills’, London Wall, he received 13d. Robert and Thomas were paid at the same rate when lathing and loaming the company’s new storehouse in Dowgate, although Robert only worked 6 days compared with Thomas’s 141/2 days.[23] There are no details of the task they undertook at Mr Dummer’s tenement in Bearebinder Lane in 1566-67 where they each received 16s 3d for fifteen days’ work.[24] In 1578-9 Robert was paid for one day’s work at the Lothbury houses, for which he received 14d.[25] Johnson was also a member of the team employed in the Royal Works on routine repairs at Eltham Palace from May-July 1569, working a total of 44 days at 12d per day.[26] Johnson’s name first appeared in the Company records when he presented Christopher Mallary on 7 November 1572. He was fined for bad language (4 February 1574/5) and for disobedience (23 November 1576). He was among those contributing to the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill ‘tuching artificers’ (Court Day, March 1580/1). When he presented William Bagnall, the Company received ‘more of hym for the good will of the company to have the boy’ (16 November 1582).

JOHNSON, Thomas I (fl. 1563; d. 1617)

A Plasterer who, like Robert Johnson, was an ex-apprentice of Robert Shepparde when the latter made his will in 1576, leaving 10s to his ‘sometime servant’.[27] Thomas may already have been free when he began a long association with the Drapers’ Company in 1563-64, sometimes in company with Robert and sometimes on his own. They worked together in 1563-64 at William Bugge’s house in Lothbury for one day for 1s each;[28] and in 1564-65 they were each paid at the same rate of 13d per day when lathing and loaming the company’s new storehouse in Dowgate, although Robert only worked 6 days compared with Thomas’s 141/2 days. That same year Thomas also earned 4s 101/2d when he mended the gable end and side of a house in Dowgate.[29] There are no details of the task they undertook at Mr Dummer’s tenement in Bearebinder Lane in 1566-67, where they each received 16s 3d for fifteen days’ work.[30] In 1567-68 he was employed for one day in repairing the walls in several tenements in The Vintry, together with his labourer, John Johnson.[31] At Mr Dummer’s house in Bassishaw in 1568-69 he led the team which included Thomas Piggen, John Piggen, Richard Wood and John Johnson, all working a different number of days at varying rates of pay; Thomas was paid at the highest rate of 14d per day.[32]

Johnson paid fines for beadleship (25 July 1576) and for ‘callinge of on of his brethren knave’ (13 October 1576); Peter Bastley was presented by him on the same date. An unspecified fine was incurred (15 August 1577) and an anonymous apprentice presented (27 February 1578/9). In 1578-79 Thomas Johnson’s man was part of a team of plasterers that included William Bottom (the Company’s plasterer) that worked on the interior of Drapers’ Hall, whitewashing numerous places and colouring the windows of the hall with ‘leade Coulour’.[33] Johnson contributed to the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill ‘tuching artificers’ (Court Day, March 1580/1) and was fined for bad language (13 November 1584). He paid for his pattern on entering the Livery and for his dinner (12 and 17 September 1585). Edward Robinson I was presented by him on 11 February 1585/6 (freed 13 October 1593). His election as Junior Warden for 1586-7 took place on 12 September 1586. Further fines for ill language were incurred (15 February 1588/9; 25 January 1590/1). Another anonymous apprentice was presented (29 August 1589) and Mr Johnson was fined for not bringing in the indentures of an apprentice who had run away (11 September 1590). When William Piggen I made his will on 13 October 1592 Johnson, his ‘very good friend’, was left the substantial bequest of half the income from the rental of properties he owned (apart from his own house) and his violet gown; and was named joint-executor with Piggen’s wife, Bridget.[34] Johnson was elected Senior Warden for 1594-5. Edward Brackley was turned over to Mr Johnson from Mr Essex (25 July 1595); and from Johnson to John Hinde (10 March 1595/6). After 1596 it is not clear whether it is Thomas Johnson I or II who is presenting apprentices as the clerk was inconsistent in his use of ‘Mr’ to differentiate them. Johnson then presented John Hornby (4 June 1596); and Hinde turned over Hugh Flood to Johnson (23 April 1597). George Jackson, son of a Lancashire farmer, was apprenticed for 7 years (27 September 1598); John Blinkhorne (28 April 1600); Morris Hill, son of a Montgomeryshire carpenter, for 8 years (19 May 1603; turned over to Hugh Morris 11 August 1604). From 1606 onwards Mr Johnson received wages as the Company’s Beadle (23 April 1606) and it seems unlikely that he would have taken any additional apprentices after that date. He was due to retire as Beadle in 1608 (19 February 1607/8 and 23 April 1608) but it was decided to allow him to serve another year (3 August 1608, 22 April, 15 July and 13 October 1609); and he was still in post on 23 January 1609/10 and 23 April 1610). Meanwhile, on 28 July 1609 a memorandum recorded that he was to be given a yearly pension ‘for and in regard of his extraordinary paynes which he hath taken a longe tyme and also in regard that he himselfe is past labour and has not had an apprentice for a long time’. In addition, he was excused from continuing in the Livery on account of his poverty. He received a benevolence in addition to his Beadle’s wage on 13 October 1610. On 25 January 1615/16 and 25 July 1616, John Lambe was paid for assisting Mr Johnson, who was still receiving the Beadle’s fee. The Company made a payment to Johnson’s wife towards the charges of his burial on 3 March 1616/17; and it was decided that she was to be paid an annual pension as the widow of Thomas Johnson (23 April 1618). In addition, she was one of the widows receiving charity on 25 January 1619/20.

JOHNSON, Thomas II (fl. 1592-1611)

A Plasterer presented by John Hopper (3 December 1585), who paid his fines for abling (29 August 1592) and beadleship (23 August 1594). After 1596 it is not clear whether it is Thomas Johnson I or II who is presenting apprentices as the clerk was inconsistent in his use of ‘Mr’ to differentiate them. Johnson presented John Hornby (4 June 1596); and Hinde turned over Hugh Flood to Johnson (23 April 1597). George Jackson, son of a Lancashire farmer, was apprenticed for 7 years (27 September 1598); John Blinkhorne (28 April 1600); Morris Hill, son of a Montgomeryshire carpenter, for 8 years (19 May 1603; turned over to Hugh Morris 11 August 1604). Robert Hand was presented for 8 years (28 May 1606) and John Atkinson, son of a Kent yeoman, for 8 years (14 October 1611). On 21 May 1613 James Gates was freed as the apprentice of Thomas Johnson without any record of his presentation. Thomas Johnson II was listed in the Yeomanry of the Company up to 1610, and was recorded as having died in 1610-11.

JOHNSON, Thomas III (fl. 1593-1597)

A plasterer whose son Anthony was baptised at St Saviour Southwark on 21 October 1593 and was buried in the same parish on 8 May 1597.[35] This man may be identical with either Thomas Johnson I or II, or neither.

JONES, David (fl. 1609-22)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Denbighshire yeoman, presented by Thomas Flood for 7 years (1 August 1601). He was granted his freedom by redemption at the request of Sir Thomas Middleton, knight, on 27 June 1609. He paid his beadleship fine (31 August 1609) and was fined for lateness (13 October 1612). His name appears among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1622, when it is replaced by Widow Jones until 1625.

JONES, Ellis (fl. 1580; d. 1595)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine and made a donation for the poor on 4 March 1586/7. His beadleship fine followed on 1 September and 3 November 1587. Jones was presumably still an apprentice when he was one of the plasterers paid for work ‘on the newe howse in Flete lane’ by the Clothworkers' Company in 1580-81; he worked there for 12 days at 16d per day.[36] An unnamed apprentice was presented on 28 April 1592, when Jones was fined for keeping a boy above six months (presumably Hugh Capp, who was turned over on 3 July 1595, following his master’s death). Jones presented Paul Sleigh on 5 April 1594, the last occasion on which he appeared in the Court Minute Book. Jones was recorded in the parish registers of St Giles Cripplegate at the baptism of a son John (4 October 1592) and the burial of a servant John Jones (20 August 1593).[37] Jones made his final will on 12 April 1595.[38] He left 'my mother Bridget Jones £6 13s 4d; his sister-in-law Ann Bartlett 53s. 4d; Alice Harborow 30s; Ann Darlow 20s. and cited his friend Richard Whitlocke, Citizen and Goldsmith, as executor. Ellis Jones was buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 22 April 1595.

JONES, Griffin (fl. 1615-25)

A Plasterer who was presented by Thomas Flood (27 October 1608) and paid his abling and freedom fines (16 November 1615); but is otherwise only listed in the Quarterage Accounts, remaining a member of the Yeomanry until 1625.

JONES, Henry (fl. 1608-1615)

A Plasterer who was presented by Edmond Harrison on 23 April 1602. Jones’s freedom is not recorded (perhaps because Harrison died in 1608) but Jones’s name appears in the Quarterage Accounts from 1609 until his death is noted in 1615. Jones was paid for work alongside Roger Spooner and George Echell, building and repairing the houses in the Churchyard at St Dunstan in the West in 1608-09.[39] 

JONES, Hugh (d. 1625)

A plasterer buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 13 June 1625.[40]   

JONES, John (fl. 1621-9)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Herefordshire husbandman, presented by David Price for 8 years (25 June 1613). He paid fines for his abling (22 August 1621) and beadleship (25 August 1624). He was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 23 April 1629.

JONES, Maurice/Morris (fl. 1614-54)

A Plasterer whose master, Thomas Davies, was fined for failing to present him for over six months when he was finally presented on 5 May 1606. He paid his abling and freedom fines on 17 July 1614. His son Thomas was baptised at St Katharine Coleman Street on 19 March 1614/15.[41] On 30 May 1616 it was noted that a date had been set for his payment of a fine for bad work. His beadleship fine was paid on 8 August 1616. Thereafter his name only appears when he pays arrearage of quarterage, until 23 February 1653/4 when he was given 16s by the Company.

JONES, William (fl. 1570-87)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 17 August 1576. While still an apprentice he was paid for work at the Church of St Alphage Cripplegate between 7 December 1569 and 17 December 1570, where he earned 16s 4d for 14 days’ work.[42] Jones paid his beadleship fine (15 August 1577) and was fined ‘for setting his man on worke’ (27 April 1581). This presumably referred to Thomas Ancell, whom he presented on 25 July 1581. His name last appears in a memorandum of 15 November 1686 concerning a payment he is to make to Roger Celye [presumably Robert Kelley] by instalments. The parish registers of St Giles Cripplegate record the burial of a wife Elizabeth on 18 December 1587.[43]


[1] TNA E 101/474/19.

[2] TNA E 352/3267.

[3] TNA AO 1/2427/64.

[4] TNA AO 1/2427/64.

[5] TNA AO 1/2428/70.

[6] TNA WORK 5/1.

[7] TNA WORK 5/2.

[8] TNA WORK 5/3.

[9] TNA E 159/355, rots 212, 213, 215.

[10] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/012B, numbered for digitization 68.

[11] LMA P69/GRE/A/001/MS 10231.

[12] LMA P69/LAW1/B/008/MS 02593/001, f. 128r.   

[13] TNA WORK 5/1.  

[14] TNA AO 1/2415/23.

[15] Drapersl Company Renters’ Accounts: RA5/8, f. 12r and RA 5/9, f. 15v.

[16] W A Littledale (ed), The Registers of St Vedast, Foster Lane and of St Michael le Querne, London, Harleian Society, 29, Vol II Burials (1903), p. 130.

[17] TNA E 101/464/25.

[18] LMA P69/ALP/B/006/MS 01432/002.

[19] LMA P69/CLE/A/001/MS 04783.

[20] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/017F, numbered for digitization 41.

[21] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/016, f. 268.  

[22] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/4, ff. 13r and 22v.

[23] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/5, ff. 15r and 22r.

[24] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/7, f. 12r.

[25] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/15, f. 11.

[26] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 212v, 220v, 228v.

[27] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/016, f. 268.  

[28] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/4, f. 13r.

[29] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/5, f. 22r and 24v.

[30] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/7, f. 12r.

[31] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/8, f. 12r.

[32] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/9, f. 15v.

[33] Drapers’ Company Renters’ Accounts: RA 5/15, f. 18v.

[34] TNA PROB 11/80.

[35] LMA P92/SAV/3001.

[36] The Clothworkers’ Company : Quarter and Renter Wardens’ Accounts: CL/D/5/3.

[37] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.

[38] LMA CLC/313/K/C/003/MS 25626/003, f. 10r.

[39] LMA P69/DUN2/B/011/MS 02968/002.

[40] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[41] LMA P69/KAT1/A/001/MS 017832.

[42] LMA P69/ALP/B/006/MS 01432/002.

[43] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001.