Gazetteer of Plasterers - M

MACKMAHON, Edmund (d. 1593)

A Citizen and Plasterer of St Sepulchre without Newgate whose name does not appear in the Company’s records. Mackmahon made his final will on 17 September 1593, and asked to be buried in the green churchyard of his parish church. He left his black cloak lined with brown baize and fringed with lace to his brother-in-law Robert Pitts, Butcher. He left his bible to his friend Walter Savage, and the rest of his goods to Thomasine his wife, who was named executrix. Savage and Pitts were named overseers of the will, which was proved on 16 October 1593.[1] 

MADDOXE (MADOXE), Robert (fl. 1609-39)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to John Clarkson as Robert Price, son of Price Madoxe, a Herefordshire yeoman, for 10 years (12 November 1602). On 8 December 1609 Clarkson paid to have Robert Maddoxe made free two years before the end of his term, so that he could take another apprentice. Maddoxe paid his beadleship fine (7 August 1612) and made payments on William Godsay’s behalf to clear a debt (8 & 26 July, 3 September 1613). On that last date Maddoxe was fined for ill work in Foster Lane, near Goldsmiths’ Hall and was given five days in which to put it right ‘at his perill’. He was recorded in the parish registers of St Giles Cripplegate at the baptism of a daughter Mary on 2 February 1614/5.[2] Maddoxe was fined for abusing the Master and Company in open court with scandalous words, asserting that he never did ‘gett a wench with child’ as some of them had done (30 August 1627). He remained in the Yeomanry and was last recorded paying arrearge of quarterage on 7 November 1639.

MAHUM, Edmond (fl. 1591-2)

A Plasterer who was presented by Robert Kellie (22 May 1584) and paid his abling fine (19 June 1591). He was only recorded once more, paying his beadleship fine on 29 August 1592.

MALL, John (fl. 1591)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine on 30 July 1591 but whose name does not appear again in the Company records.

MALONE (MALLOWE, MOULDEN, MULDEN), Thomas (fl. 1612-25)

A Plasterer from County Meath, Ireland, who was apprenticed to John Welsh for 8 years (6 July 1604). He paid his beadleship fine (30 September 1612) and was fined for various offences: for lateness (13 October 1612); for setting a bricklayer to work in plastering (9 December 1612); for bad work (19 May 1615). On 9 September 1622 he promised to pay part of the assessment that he owed. His name is not recorded in the Quarterage Accounts after 1625.

MALTBY, Thomas (fl. 1565)

A Citizen and Plasterer of London, living in the parish of All Hallows Stayning when he made his will on 26 March 1565.[3] Maltby requested that his apprentices, Antony Heyton and George Cleveland, should be forgiven ‘all the tyeme of ther Absence’, provided they served out the remainder of their terms faithfully with his wife. In addition, he left them the tools of his occupation. He left 6s 8d to each of his brother’s two children. The residue of his estate was left to his wife and executrix, Ellyn. The witnesses included the plasterer, Olyver Thomas. The will was proved on 2 April 1565.

MANN (MAN, MANNE), Michael (fl. 1604-5)

A Plasterer who is listed in the Quarterage Accounts as a member of the Livery in 1604-5 but as ‘ded’ in 1606. Mann made his will on 17 January 1604/5 when he was living in the parish of St Andrew Undershaft.[4] His first bequest was to ‘my verye loving frende’ Thomas Johnson (probably one of the plasterers of that name but his occupation is not specified), who was to receive Mann’s livery gown, 10s and to act as overseer of the will. Other items of clothing and small sums of money were left to a brother, a nephew and other friends. The residue was left to his wife [name illegible] who was also the executrix of the will, which was proved on 21 January 1604/5.

MARLIN, William (fl. 1593)

A plasterer of St Michael Cornhill whose wife Joan was witness was witness in a Consistory Court case.[5] [Possibly identical with William Morley.]

MARSH, James (fl. 1608-25)

A Plasterer who was the son of an Oxfordshire tanner, apprenticed to Walter Hill for 7 years (27 March 1601) and freed on 8 June 1608. On 26 July 1613 he made part payment of an unspecified debt. Marsh was recorded in the parish registers of St Olave Southwark at the burial of a daughter Margaret on 4 September 1615.[6] His name was listed among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1625.

MARSHALL, William (fl. 1606-25)

A Plasterer, son of a London carman, who was presented by Richard Browne I for 7 years (10  November 1598), was admitted to the freedom (7 March 1605/6) and paid his beadleship fine (14 August 1607). A memorandum of 6 November 1607 recorded that Marshall and Thomas Davies had consented to arbitration by four men appointed by the Master to settle the controversy over a piece of work that had arisen between them. Marshall incurred several fines: unspecified (12 February 1607/8); for ill speeches against Mr Browne before the Lord Mayor (28 July 1609). Marshall was warned by the Chamberlain’s officer (11 August 1609) and the Company paid for the order from the Lord Mayor concerning Marshall’s apprentice (31 August 1609); Marshall was eventually fined for buying an apprentice from William Terry contrary to the Company’s ordinances (12 March 1609/10). His absence was cause for another fine (9 December 1612). Ellis Norman, son of an Oxfordshire husbandman, was presented by Marshall for 8 years (25 February 1612/13). His next apprentices were: Charles Davies, son of a husbandman from Monmouth, for 8 years (30 April 1616); John Middleton, of a Westchester gentleman, for 7 years (30 April 1619); Giles Spoke, son of a Gloucestershire gentleman, deceased (30 October and 4 December 1620); Edward Stanford, son of a Middlesex bargeman, for 8 years (23 April 1623). Marshall is listed among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1625.

MARTIN (MARTEN), Thomas (fl. 1608)

A Plasterer who worked under Richard Dungan at Salisbury House for 18 days in 1608.[7] He was part of the team that received 20d per day for whiting the great chamber, withdrawing chamber, library, the stairs and other rooms.

MARTIN (MARTYN), William (fl. 1595-1602)       

A Plasterer who was presented by Richard Ratcliffe (20 December 1588) but turned over to Thomas Ratcliffe (8 November 1594). His abling fine was paid in two instalments (6 February and 10 March 1595/6). He was fined for ill work in Masons Alley (13 October 1600) and for setting a boy to work unbound (3 January 1600/1 and 18 February 1601/2). He finally presented William White, son of a Nottinghamshire yeoman, for 8 years (1 March 1601/2). Martin must have died soon after this as his name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts, while that of Widow Martin is recorded for 1606-7 but is crossed through for 1608.

MARTLEY, Robert (fl. 1623-5)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Gloucester lantern-maker, presented by William Widmore for 9 years (24 April 1615). He was freed and paid his abling fine on 11 July 1623 but his name was only recorded in the Quarterage Accounts until 1625.

MASLIN, Richard (fl. 1593)

A Plasterer who was fined for ill work on 18 May 1593.

MASON (MASSON), George (fl. 1582-1613)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 4 July 1582 and was one of the ‘bachelors’ for 1582-3. He paid his beadleship fine (16 August 1583). Other fines arose from evil work and for ‘setting over of one [Thomas] Widmore from Randall Shene’ (22 May 1584). Ill work incurred a further fine and he was carried to prison (12 September 1589). Mason and Thomas Oldham were both fined for using ill language to each other (17 March 1592/3). Ill work at St Mary at Hill was fined (30 April 1594) but Mason was nevertheless selected for the Livery and paid for his pattern (9 August 1594). His first apprentice was Walter Elsmore (8 November 1594), turned over to John Jackson (28 April 1600). He was followed by: Robert Bowe (25 April 1606); John Ridge, Hugh Casey’s apprentice was turned over to him (16 November 1607. On 11 October 1608 Ridge aka Rich was banished from the City and its Liberties and forbidden to work as a plasterer because he left his master on several occasions, including a spell from 19 June – 2 October 1608); Thomas Craswell (3 August 1608); Roger England was turned over to him and then to Edward Robinson (28 July 1609 and 26 April 1611). Mr Mason’s man [presumably Craswell] was sent to Bridewell (23 April 1611). His next apprentices were: George Dell, son of a clerk from Bath, for 8 years (27 October 1611); William Knight from Worcestershire for 8 years (11 June 1612). Further ill work was fined: in Fetter Lane (27 April 1597); in Tower Street (6 November 1605); unspecified (30 June 1608).

Mason stood in the election for Junior Warden for 1604-5 but his name was crossed out (9 September 1604). He was chosen again the following year and served as Junior Warden for 1605-6 (10 September 1605). On 5 May 1606 he paid for ‘2 Shirtes’. He served as Senior Warden for 1609-10 but seems to have fallen on hard times as a payment was recorded on 12 May 1613 for Mr Mason’s funeral, when it was noted that he died three days after receiving charity.

MASON, William (fl. 1604)

A Plasterer who was presented by Morgan Dowling (8 March 1582/3) but whose freedom went unrecorded. His name appears for the last time when he was fined for ill work on 6 July 1604.

MASSEY, George (fl. 1571-81)

A Plasterer who paid unspecified fines (7 December 1571 and 8 November 1577) and for his beadleship (8 August 1573). He made a contribution towards the cost of the Company’s bill concerning artificers on 4 August 1581 but his name does not appear again in the Company’s records.

MATHEW, Francis (fl. 1587 d. before 1606)

A Plasterer who must have been one of the many anonymous apprentices who are listed in the Court minutes, as his name first appears when he paid his abling fine (28 April 1587). This was quickly followed by his beadleship fine (18 August and 3 November 1587). He was fined for ill work: in Bridewell (20 December 1588); at the Cardinal’s Hat without Newgate (25 August 1591); unspecified (15 July 1598); in Trinity Lane (28 April 1599); in Blackfriars (30 May 1599); in Fleet Street and Holborn (10 September 1599). Robert Scolthroppe was presented on 28 April 1592, when Mathew was fined for keeping a boy more than six months unbound. Another fine was incurred, ‘for taking work by taske of a Carpenter’ (6 July 1593); and another for arresting Edmund Harrison ‘without lycence of the house’ (5 November 1596). His next apprentice was Thomas Goldsmith, son of a Buckinghamshire bricklayer, for 7 years (30 May 1599), when Mathew was again fined for keeping a boy more than six months unbound. Goldsmith was later turned over to Thomas Browne (14 May 1602). Mathew died intestate leaving two properties in Harp Alley, Shoe Lane, valued at £10 per annum. When his widow died the administrator, appointed in 1606 on behalf of their infant son, went to court to obtain payment of the rents.[8]

MATTINGLEY, John (fl. 1569)

A plasterer working as part of the team under Thomas Kellie on unspecified work at Greenwich Palace in January 1568/9. Mattingley worked for 24 days at 12d per day.[9]

MAY, Richard (fl. 1579)

A Plasterer who is recorded as making his oath on admission to the Company on 12 September 1579 but whose name does not appear again.

METCALFE (MEDCALF), Roger (fl. 1595; d.1613)

A Plasterer who was presented by Edward Broadbent on 11 May 1588 and paid his abling fine on 3 July 1595. His beadleship fine followed on 3 September 1596 and he paid to enter the Livery on 27 April 1604. Metcalfe was fined for ill work on numerous occasions: in Byrchin Lane (10 March 1595/6); in Holborn (11 November 1597, 4 August 1606 and 11 August 1609); at a Doctors (9 November 1599); unspecified (24 June 1602); in Newgate Market (11 February 1602/3 and 25 April 1606); near Holborn Conduit (5 June 1605); in Fetter Lane (7 September and 6 November 1605 and again 10 May 1609); at Smithfield Bar (23 May 1606); in Duck Lane (23 February 1612/13). Another offence to incur a fine was his slandering of Mr Thomas Browne (28 July 1602). Metcalfe was fined for keeping a boy over six months when his first (unnamed) apprentice was presented (12 May 1600). Anthony Shread, son of a Leicestershire yeoman, was presented for 8 years (27 April 1604); John Morris, son of a Leicester pinmaker, for 7 years (2 August 1611); Henry Chippinge for 8 years (23 April 1612). On 10 April 1613 Metcalfe made his will as a resident of the parish of St Sepulchre without Newgate. His wife was to be his executrix and residuary legatee after bequests of money (£10 each to Elizabeth Houldredge and her three children, ten years after his death) and jewellery: a plain gold ring to Mrs Milles; a gold ring with an agate stone which he used to wear, to Clement Pargiter; a gold ring with a death’s head on it, valued at 20s, to his cousin Richard Challinor; and to the witnesses and overseers of the will, Fulke Barker and William Scarborough, rings of gold valued at 20s each. The will was proved on 22 April 1613.[10] Widow Metcalfe continued to pay quarterage until 1625.

MELTON Henry (fl. 1607)

A plasterer working as part of the large team assembled for 4-6 days to ‘beautify’ the Merchant Taylors’ Hall in preparation for a royal visit in 1607, all earning 2s per day.[11]

MEYBORNE (MAYBORNE, MABURNE), Hugh (fl. 1593-1609)

A Plasterer presented by Richard Barfield (12 September 1586), who paid his fines for abling (23 November 1593) and beadleship (2 August 1595). He presented David ap Price, son of a Radnorshire yeoman, for 7 years (19 June 1600). Ill work incurred fines: in Cornhill (10 September 1602); unspecified (17 August and 7 September 1604). He paid his contribution towards the renewal of the Company’s charter (22 May 1605). In 1605 he was employed at the Church of St Margaret New Fish Street ‘mending the windowe at the east ende of the quier and plastering Mr Colinges howse’, for which he received £5 10s 9d.[12] Meyborne’s name is not recorded in the Quarterage Accounts after 1609.

MICHAELLS, Harman (fl. 1608)

An ‘estranger’, possibly a plasterer, to whom Nicholas Richardson was ‘sett over’ on payment of 2s, having been presented by Humfrey Dovey (24 August 1608). Dovey also presented Hendrey Michell, son of Harman of London, for 8 years (25 July 1620). As Henrie Mitchel he was later turned over from Dovey to Thomas Camp [?Thomas Chapman] (4 November 1620). A marginal annotation was added in 1623 that ‘this apprentice never bound’.

MILLER, Christopher (fl. 1606-39)

A Plasterer who was turned over to John Hinde from Henry Bettes (30 November 1599), his original apprenticeship having gone unrecorded. Miller paid his admission fine (27 June 1606) but after that his name appears only in connection with payment of arrearage, the last payment recorded on 21 November 1639. His son Henry Miller was freed by patrimony on 18 July 1633.

A charitable payment was made to Widow Miller on 26 July 1658, who may have been the widow of Christopher or Henry.

MILLER (MILNER, MYLLER), Hugh (fl. 1598-1619)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Thomas Gower (30 July 1591), who paid his abling fine in several instalments (25 August, 20 November 1598 and 28 April, 30 May, 25 July 1599). His beadleship fine followed (16 August 1600). Miller was fined on more than one occasion: for ill language (29 January 1601/2); for evil speeches about Mr Dungan (28 April 1609); for absence from a Company burial (31 January 1611/12); for evil work (20 February 1611/12). A payment of £12 14s 2d was made to ‘mr hughe Miller of London Plasterer for new plastering the side towards the wilderness and other places about knoll house and for some things bought by him as appeareth’, for the period 1611-12.[13] Miller’s apprentices were numerous, beginning with Richard Evans from Herefordshire for 8 years (24 November 1604); Richard Gorton (who had left his master without permission on 8 December 1607 and was newly bound to him on 5 March 1607/8); Richard Barrett (15 March 1608/9); Miller was fined for buying William Sutton from Richard Cobb, contrary to Company Ordinances (4 March 1610/11); Amos Jackson (30 June 1615); Robert Suter from Worcestershire for 7 years (7 November 1617). Miller was elected to the Livery and paid for his pattern (6 August 1608); and contributed 5s towards the cost of a Company lawsuit (2 February 1608/9). He was elected Junior Warden for 1617-18 (29 September 1617). On 2 April 1619 reference was made to ‘Mr Miller’s burial’. Widow Miller continued to pay quarterage as an Assistant but returned to the Yeomanry from 1620-23.

MILTON (MELTON, MYLTON), Henry (fl. 1568-70)

A plasterer who was a member of Thomas Kellie’s team working at Greenwich Palace from November 1568 - January 1568/9, new plastering the great chamber and the gallery into the park. He worked a total of 56 days at 12d per day. He returned in May-June 1569 when he spent 35 days on unspecified plastering work; and for 6 days in June-July 1569 he was one of the team engaged in new plastering and blacking the ‘tennis playe’ and plastering and whiting various places in the lodgings.[14] Milton made his will on 29 August 1570, as a plasterer living in Hosier Lane in the Parish of St Sepulchre.[15] A long list of debts owed by Milton far outweighed credits owed to him. Any residue after the settlement of these debts was left to his wife, Margery. On 4 July the following year administration was granted to Thomas Kellie during the minority of Milton’s natural son, Thomas, as had been requested by Milton when alive.[16]

MINOR (MYNOR), Giles (fl. 1612-46)

A Plasterer, son of a Gloucestershire weaver, who was apprenticed to Thomas Widmore for 8 years (17 August 1604). After being made free (24 August 1612), Minor subsequently paid his beadleship fine (30 June 1615). His first apprentice was Edward Goodenough, son of a Gloucestershire baker, who served 8 years (30 January 1617/18) Goodenough was freed on 3 July 1626 when Minor was fined for not enrolling his apprentice. William Smart, son of a Carmarthen weaver, apprenticed himself for 8 years (26 July 1630) and when he was freed Minor was again fined for not enrolling his apprentice (4 August 1637). Apart from the occasions when he paid arrearage of quarterage or assessment, Minor’s name does not appear again until he was added to the list of pensioners on 13 October 1642. On 3 April 1646 he was described as ‘lately deceased’.

MITSON, Henry (fl. 1601)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to John Humfrey (24 July 1594) and who paid his abling fine (3 September 1601). His name does not appear in the Quarterage Accounts that survive from 1604.

MITTON, Henry (fl. 1613-14)

A Plasterer presented by Nicholas Henshawe (6 November 1605). When Mitton was freed (25 February 1612/13), his master was fined for not enrolling his apprentice and for giving him ‘a yeare & better’ off his term without the Company’s consent. Mitton’s name appears among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until it is annotated ‘dead’ in 1614.

MONDELOWE (MUNDELOE, MUNDELOW, MVNDELOO), John (fl. 1537-81)

A Plasterer who was employed in the King’s Works at numerous sites in the 1530s and 40s. In May 1537 he was working for 7 days as part of the large team of plasterers at Hampton Court, earning 4s 1d at 7d per day.[17] In July and August of that year he was at Chobham, lathing and daubing partitions in various lodgings, where he earned 6s 8d for 10 days’ work at 8d.[18] Numerous plasterers were employed at Canterbury in 1539 plastering and colouring the King’s lodgings; and Mondelowe worked there for 27 days in November, receiving 18s 8d at 8d per day.[19] In September 1539 he returned to Greenwich to assist with daubing, pargetting and whitewashing the King’s stables and blacking the walls before the King’s great horses’ heads.[20] Mondelowe spent 14 days in August-September 1542 at Eltham Palace, plastering the King’s chapel, great chamber and raying chamber, in addition to general repairs and maintenance. At the rate of 8d per day he earned 9s 4d.[21] His rate of pay dropped back to 7d when he was engaged on routine plastering at Greenwich in October and November 1542, working 21 days for 12s 10d.[22] He was paid again at 8d per day when he was working alone, with a labourer, at The More for 5 days in August 1543, where he received 3s 4d for repairing and whitewashing the King’s great chamber and stables.[23] As a Company member Mondelowe was fined for disobedience (2 November 1571). Ellis Johnson was apprenticed to him (13 October 1573) but was returned to Richard Johnson on 30 March 1579. Mondelowe made his will on 7 November 1580 leaving everything, including his debts, to his wife and executrix, Jane. 20s was left to his daughter Margaret and her husband William Stevens, with the proviso that, in return, they would discharge his widow of all debts and duties which he owed to them. Probate was granted on 13 May 1581.[24]

MONEY (MONYE, MOONYE, MOOEN), James (fl. 1585-1633)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Smalladge Kelley (8 November 1577) and paid his abling fine on 23 April 1585, when he also made a donation for the poor. Money put his mark, rather than a signature, to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17).

Money was fined for his work in Fetter Lane (3 December 1595); for ill work in Chancery Lane and without Temple Bar (28 April 1599); for ‘ill work in various places’ (26 July 1601); evil work in Fetter Lane (6 November 1605); evil work in Fleet Street (28 April 1607); for evil work in Walthamstow by his servant (21 August 1609). Of his fifteen apprentices, only four completed their terms and gained the freedom of the Company. John Whitcomb was presented by him (24 July 1594); he was followed by John Canter of Gloucester for 7 years (25 July 1598); Owen Jones, son of a Shropshire husbandman, for 8 years (30 May 1599); John Rushall, son of a Worcestershire yeoman, for 8 years (14 August 1601); William Taylor, son of a Herefordshire shoemaker, for 8 years (28 July 1602); Nicholas Dowling, son of an Irish yeoman, for 8 years (5 May 1603); Thomas Rochford, son of County Dublin merchant, for 9 years (11 August 1604); John Murphy, son of an Irish tailor, for 8 years (9 September 1604. Murphy paid Money £5 in lieu of serving one year as his journeyman); Robert Elledge from Staffordshire (20 September 1611; previously presented by John Langford); Bartholomew Vicar (27 April 1612); Samuel Randall, son of a Buckinghamshire husbandman, for 7 years (26 March 1613); Thomas Grove, John Pitcher’s apprentice, was turned over to him (25 January 1613/14); John Davies, son of a Hereford husbandman, for 8 years (3 March 1616/17); James Benson, son of a London bricklayer, for 7 years (22 June 1625); Thomas Million, son of a Northamptonshire labourer, for 7 years (6 March 1625/6; freed 7 February 1632/3, when he was fined for being freed ‘before his time’). Money continued to pay quarterage as a member of the Yeomanry but on 25 July 1633 he received a charitable donation and was granted a pension of 5s a quarter, provided he took no more apprentices.

MONEY (MOONEY), Richard (fl. 1604)

A Plasterer presented by Cornelius Hand (4 September 1572). Money’s freedom was not recorded but he was listed among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts for 1604.

MONKES (MONCAS), John I (fl. 1571-76)

A Plasterer who in 1562 was described in Thomas Monkes will as ‘my kinsman and prentize’. Thomas left him 40s, six silver pence and six silver spoons, to be delivered to him at the end of his apprenticeship, served either with his wife or whoever she appointed from the Plasterers’ Company. John paid his beadleship fine on 1 September 1571. He subsequently paid unspecified fines (7 November, 5 December 1572). His first apprentice was Robert Priestman, presented 8 August 1573. On election to the Livery Monkes paid for his pattern (6 August 1574). He was fined for lateness (2 September 1575). On 23 October 1576 he made his will as a parishioner of St Mary at Hill. He left 20s each to his two children and his unborn child; any residue after the payment of debts and funeral expenses went to his wife, Johan. The will was proved on 5 November 1576.[25] On 25 January 1577 the Clerk made a reference to the ‘buryall of Goodman Moncas’. Robert Priestman was turned over from Widow Monkes (30 March 1579), while his son, John II, was freed by patrimony (14 June 1611).

MONKES (MONCAS), John II (fl. 1611-25)

On 14 June 1611, John Monkes, son of John I, ‘late Citizen & plaisterer of London, deceased’ was made free by patrimony. His name was recorded among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1625; but as there are no other references to him in the Company records it is possible that he was not active as a plasterer.

MONKES (MONCAS, MONCKHUSE, MONKESTE, MUNKAS), Thomas (fl. 1537-62)

A Plasterer who was presented by John Monkes on Ash Wednesday 1525.[26] Monkes was one of several plasterers with the same surname who were employed in the Royal Works during the reign of Henry VIII, leading a peripatetic existence from one royal palace to another. Thomas earned only 7d per day for the 7 days he was working at Oatlands in August-September 1537.[27] From March-April 1538 he was working for 18 days in the Queen’s lodgings at Greenwich, where his rate of pay had risen to 8d per day.[28] This was maintained at Canterbury in November 1539 when the King’s lodgings were thoroughly refurbished in preparation for a royal visit. A total of 31½ days’ work resulted in payment of 18s 8d.[29] A great deal of plastering work was undertaken in the King’s lodgings at The More in October 1541 and Thomas spent just over 12 days there, earning 8s 1d.[30] He was one of seven plasterers who worked under Patrick Kellie in the long gallery at Whitehall Palace in May 1559 in preparation for the visit of the French embassy.[31]  By that date his rate of pay had risen to 11d per day for two days’ work. From October 1537 - 13 July 1538 and 27 July - 28 September 1538 Monkes was also busily employed as a plasterer/dauber by the London Bridge House, at various sites including Paternoster Row, Newgate Market and Deptford. He also supplied bushels of hair ‘for the new house in Cheap’ and ‘a fine sieve for the plasterer’, which cost 7d.[32] In 1548 Thomas Monkes was a Warden of the Company when an apprentice of Oliver Thomas obtained his freedom.[33] Monkes made his will on 10 August 1562, leaving 5s to the needy poor on the day of his burial and £10 to Elizabeth, his natural daughter. The only other beneficiary, apart from his widow, was John Monkes I, ‘my kinsman and apprentice’, who was to receive 40s and items of silver at the completion of his apprenticeship. The residue of his estate was left to his wife and executrix, Johan. Among the witnesses was Thomas Olyver, Plasterer. The will was proved on 20 August 1562.[34]

MOORE, John (fl. 1602-4)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Richard Barfield (10 January 1594/5), who paid Moore’s abling fine when he was freed (18 February 1601/2). Moore was recorded as ‘mort’ in the Quarterage Accounts for 1604.

MOORE (MOORES), Peregrine (fl. 1624-55)

A Plasterer from Somerset who was presented by Peirce Godbeheare for 8 years (1 May 1617) and was freed one year early (7 May 1624). Moore paid his beadleship fine (26 January 1628/9) and was one of those making a free gift of 5s towards the cost of ‘new building of the corner house’ (13 October 1631). William Ewens, son of a Somerset husbandman, was apprenticed to him for 8 years (7 November 1633; Moore was fined for freeing Ewens early on 2 December 1641). His next apprentices were: Mungo Pattison, son of a Cumberland grocer, for 7 years (4 May 1642); Christopher Barnes, son of a Bedfordshire weaver, for 8 years (23 April 1647). On 25 July 1655 Moore’s name was crossed off a list of Company pensioners but he became a pensioner of the Benson charity on 13 October 1655, the last occasion on which his name appears in the Company records.

MOORE, Richard (fl. 1538-81)

A Plasterer who was one of the contributors to the cost of the Company’s parliamentary bill concerning artificers (Court Day March 1580/1). As a young man he had acted as a servitor to the plasterers at Oatlands from July-August 1538, when he received 5d per day.[35]

MOORE, Thomas I, the Elder (fl. 1574-86)

A Plasterer who was fined for bad work on several occasions (6 August 1574, 12 September 1579, 29 April and 24 June 1580). On 25 July 1576 he received wages as the Beadle and was further reimbursed ‘for his charges laid forth in calling a forens matter to a non sute’. Moore was also fined for supplanting Smalladge Kelley (17 February 1575/6) and for an unspecified offence (27 April 1581). He paid his contribution towards the Company’s parliamentary bill concerning artificers on 23 April 1581. Moore presented Thomas Hollywood as his apprentice (29 July 1575); and paid for the return of John Borde (23 November 1576). An unnamed apprentice was presented (6 April 1582) when Moore had to pay a fine and back payment for binding this apprentice (10 September 1585). His last apprentice was John Wantner, presented on 29 July 1586.

MOORE (MORE), Thomas II, the Younger (fl. 1574-81)

A Plasterer who paid his abling and admission fines on 19 November 1574. A memorandum of 17 August 1576 recorded that he was one of the bachelors that year. He paid the fine for his beadleship (26 July 1577) and unspecified fines (26 July 1577 and 27 February 1578/9). He paid his contribution towards the Company’s parliamentary bill concerning artificers in March 1580/1. Bad work in Ironmonger Lane incurred a fine (1 December 1581) and ill work on 9 December 1586, the last occasion on which Moore’s name appeared in the Company records.

[Moore is a possible candidate for the plasterer Thomas More, who was admitted to the freedom of the City of Dublin in 1585 ‘in consideration of labour by himself and servant on works of city for two months’.[36]]

MORLAND, John (fl. 1621-5)

A plasterer from Westmorland who was presented for 8 years by Edmund Deverell (4 November 1612). Morland paid his abling fine after his master’s decease (22 August 1621) and his beadleship fine (16 May 1622). Morland was recorded as ‘dead’ in the Quarterage Accounts for 1625.

MORLAND (MORLEY), Richard I, Senior (fl. 1590-25)

A Plasterer presented by Patrick Browne (25 July 1582), who was freed and paid his fines for abling (31 July 1590) and beadleship (25 August 1591). Morland presented several apprentices: Richard Harrison (2 August 1595); Richard Fee (22 May 1605); Henry Kellenlae (26 May 1607); his son, Richard Morland II (10 July 1607; freed by patrimony 13 January 1614/15); Thomas Gewer (5 March 1607/8); Philip Cockes (30 April 1610); William Patchett, son of a Lincolnshire labourer, for 8 years (31 October 1615). Henry Morland, son of Richard, plasterer deceased, was made free (23 April 1628). Fines were imposed for: ill work (16 March 1598/9); he was taken to the Compter (27 March 1601); for unspecified offences (14 August 1601); for evil work in Whitecross Street (14 August 1607); for ill work in partnership with John Gilson (30 November 1610); for lateness (13 October 1612).

MORLAND, Richard II, Junior (fl. 1615-27)

A Plasterer presented by his father, Richard I (23 June 1607), who was freed by patrimony (13 January 1614/15). His name was listed in the Quarterage Accounts until 1627 but does not appear in the Court Minute Book.

[Given that the names of both Richard I and II are absent from the Court Minute Book after 1615, either of them seems a possible candidate for Richardus Moreland, who was admitted a freeman of Dublin in 1622 ‘in consideration of the works that the said Richard hath done in the middle room of Tholsell, likewise that the said Richard shall wash the said middle room of the Tholsell and finish the works of arms already begun’.[37]]

MORLEY (MARLE), Henry I (fl. 1571-83)

A Plasterer who was fined for disobedience (2 November 1571) before he had even paid his beadleship fine (14 July 1574). He was further fined for bad work (23 April1580); for not wearing a gown or cloak (6 April 1582); for evil work in Duck Lane (10 September 1585). He paid his contribution to the cost of the Company’s parliamentary bill concerning artificers (Court Day, March 1580/1). Morley presented two apprentices; William Wallett (24 June 1580) and Richard Kennedy (22 April 1583). The Company paid for celebrations at Spencer’s when Kennedy was made free (8 May 1590).

MORLEY, Henry II (fl. 1582-3)

In 1582-3 Henry Morley, plasterer, and his wife Margerie, were listed among the aliens (not denizens) of the English Church in the Ward of Farringdon Without.[38]

MORLEY (MARLEY), John I Senior (fl. 1591-1627)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed ‘before his tyme’ to Richard Mowar and paid his abling fine (9 February 1590/1) and beadleship fine (9 September 1591). He was fined for ill work (7 February 1592/3 and 14 August 1593); and evil work in Silver Street and Thames Street (28 April 1607). Morley was a resident of St Michael Bassishaw, recorded in the parish registers at the baptisms of a daughter Jane (10 March 1593/4); sons Richard (4 January 1595/6); Roger (10 September 1598); John (24 January 1601); and the burial of his wife Morley on 5 August 1605. It is likely that she died in childbirth as a still-born child was buried the same day.[39] Morley was master to several apprentices: he presented Robert Richardson (14 October 1595); John Lightman, a London mariner, for 8 years (5 May 1603); Walter Morley (26 May 1607); he was fined for not enrolling his man, James Chapman, and for releasing him one year early without the Company’s consent (29 April 1613); Christopher Beane for 8 years (1 September 1615; turned over to Richard Slater on 1 May 1617); Richard Symonds, son of a Gloucestershire yeoman, for 8 years (4 November 1618; turned over to Ellis Piggen on 11 August 1620); his son, Roger, was made free by patrimony (23 May 1619). Morley’s name continued to appear in the Quarterage Accounts until 1627 but was crossed through in 1628.

MORLEY (MARLEY), John II Junior (fl. 1622-26)

A Plasterer from Lancashire who was presented by Romayne Cocke (19 May 1615), turned over to Thomas Widmore (1 March 1615/16), turned over again to Henry Stanley (30 April 1619) and accepted by Henry ap Pritchard to serve the residue of his term (5 February 1621/2). Morley was finally freed and paid his abling fine on 31 July 1622, followed by his beadleship fine on 1 September 1626. His name was crossed through in the Quarterage Accounts for 1628.

MORLEY (MORELAND), Roger (fl. 1619-36)

A Plasterer who was made free by patrimony as the son of John Morley I (23 May 1619). A memorandum dated 19 March 1623/4 noted that ‘Sir Edward Barkham knight shall have at the charge of this howse two workemen to worke with him the space of one fortnight in respect of his kindenes and love towards this companie’. Morley and William Willingham were paid £2 in recompense for a fortnight’s work for Sir Edward Barkham, with an additional payment mentioned, on 30 July 1624. On 22 June 1625 Morley alone was paid 30s by the Company for three weeks’ work he had carried out for Barkham; and another 36s followed on 25 January 1625/6. Morley paid his beadleship fine on the same date. His first apprentice was Weston West, son of an Essex tailor, presented for 8 years (20 February 1626/7); Arthur Doogood/Toogood, son of a Hertfordshire husbandman, for 8 years (13 October 1628; freed 20 November 1635).

Morley was fined for bad work ‘in divers places’ (31 August 1632). He was nominated, but not chosen, for election to the Livery (18 July 1633). Morley and Amos Jackson were jointly employed by the Royal Works at Denmark (Somerset) House in 1633-4. They received a total of £8 3s 1d for plastering the ceiling of the Queen’s withdrawing chamber; the walls of  Lady Savage’s lodgings, ‘drawn into Ashler’; plastering and roughcasting the exterior walls of the Queen’s Almoner’s lodgings; the ceiling of the Queen’s passage to the new Chapel, two doorways and a partition in the Usher’s larder.[40] Morley was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 8 March 1635/6.

MORLEY (MARLYN), William (fl. 1592)

A Plasterer who was presented by Thomas Ratcliffe (13 November 1584)  He was freed (28 January 1591/2) and paid his beadleship fine (29 August 1592).

MORREY (MORYE, MURRY, MURY), John (fl. 1568-91)

A Plasterer who was working in the Royal Works while still an apprentice. In December 1568 he was at Greenwich Palace, listed as one of the ‘prentices to the plasterers’ paid at 10d per day. Morrey worked under Thomas Kellie for 27 days, new plastering the great chamber and the gallery into the park, earning 22s 6d. In June and July 1569 he was at Eltham Palace, carrying out routine plastering, mending and whiting walls and ceilings. His rate of pay had risen to 12d per day for the 32 days he worked. He returned to Greenwich in August 1570 to work on new whiting sundry of the Queen’s lodgings, by which time he was paid 12d per day for the 18 days that he was employed there.[41] Morrey paid his abling and admission fines and made a donation for the poor when ‘he cam forth of his yeres upon Mychelmas Daie 1576’. His beadleship fine followed (25 July 1578) and he paid his contribution towards the cost of the Company’s parliamentary bill concerning artificers (March 1581). His first apprentice was Richard Dungan, presented on 4 August 1581. Morrey was fined for absence (31 July 1584); for evil work in Cock Lane (12 February 1584/5); for evil work ‘don to a howse of one Collyer A glasier without Newgate’ (2 September 1586). He was chosen to enter the Livery and paid for his pattern (10 September 1585). When Dungan was freed on 30 August 1588, Morrey presented John Cruse who was turned over from Morrey to John Hinde on 9 September 1591, the last date on which Morrey’s name was recorded.

MORRIS, Evan (fl. 1613-35)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to John Pritchard (7 March 1605/6), who was fined for not enrolling his apprentice and for giving him almost a year off his term when Morris was freed (26 March 1613). While still an apprentice, Morris was one of the many plasterers working under John Pritchard at the Merchant Taylor’s Hall, in preparation for a royal visit on Election Day 1607.[42] Morris paid his beadleship fine (1 September 1615) and was fined for lateness (13 October 1618). George Stacey, apprentice of John Allen I, was turned over to him (2 May 1621). Morris was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 13 October 1635.

MORRIS, Hugh ap Randall – more commonly recorded as Hugh RANDALL, q.v.

MORRIS, John (fl. 1613-15)

A Plasterer apprenticed to Henry Pritchard (n/d August 1606) whose freedom was not recorded; but whose name was listed in the Quarterage Accounts from 1613-15, annotated as ‘dead’ in 1616, to be replaced by Widow Morris in 1617.

MORRIS, Richard I (fl. 1603-13)

A Plasterer presented by Matthew Barrett (11 December 1596) who paid his apprentice’s abling fine when he was freed (7 December 1603). Morris donated a gilt spoon to the Company (n/d January 1604/5) and paid his beadleship fine (7 September 1605). On 6 November 1605 he was fined for ‘hererages’ [?]; and ill work in Bishopsgate Street incurred another penalty (7 March 1605/6). His first apprentice was Anthony Simpson (25 January 1608/9) who must have served out his term with Widow Morris, after Richard’s death in 1613. Widow Hellen Morris paid quarterage from 1614-19 and received charity on 25 January 1618/19, 25 January 1619/20 and 23 April 1627.

MOTHE, William (fl. 1595)

A plasterer who was one of the team employed by the Clothworkers’ Company on ‘the newe building of the parlour’. He worked there for just two days and was paid 2s 8d on 7 June 1595.

MOUNTFORD (MOMFORT, MONFORD, MUMFERD), Oliver (fl. 1616-37)

A Plasterer presented by John Hornby (27 August 1608) who was turned over to Edmund Essex by mutual consent (23 February 1608/9); and again to Solomon Eaton (4 March 1610/11) and subsequently to Widow Eaton (11 November 1614). The Company incurred expenses in going to Mortlake and Fulham about Mountford, Widow Eaton’s man (14 June 1615). Mountford finally obtained his freedom by redemption at a cost of £3 and made a gift of 40s of his own goodwill when he paid his abling fine (2 February 1615/16). He was one of those who signed his name to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17). His first apprentice was Bartholomew Mountford, son of a Bedfordshire husbandman, deceased, for 8 years (11 February 1624/5; turned over by mutual consent to John Allen II on 23 April 1625). Mountford then took on William Beech, son of a Wiltshire shoemaker (22 June 1625. The Company was involved in expenses ‘about Momfort’s man Beech’ on 25 July and 15 September 1632. Beech was freed on 13 October 1632, when he paid his fine for ‘whifling’ (i.e. beadleship) and donated a spoon to the Company). Thomas Carter, son of a Bedfordshire husbandman, was his next apprentice (7 March 1632/3); quickly followed by Nicholas Allen, son of a Derbyshire husbandman, for 7 years (18 July 1633; freed 10 August 1640. Allen was a beneficiary under the will of his master – see below). Nicholas Bruton was freed as his apprentice but had previously only been recorded as bound to Henry Dorrey (16 March 1636/7). On the same day Mountford took William Barton, son of a Leicestershire wheelwright, deceased, for 7 years, as his apprentice; but the indenture was cancelled as Barton ‘ran away’. Charles Harris, son of a Herefordshire yeoman, was apprenticed for 7 years (29 June 1637; freed 20 June 1645). Mountford incurred fines for: bad work in Thames Street (8 December 1629); he was warned before the Lord Mayor (9 September 1631); unspecified bad work (3 May 1633).

Mountford was admitted to the Livery (12 September 1625). He was a signatory to the Company memorandum raising 40s per head from the Livery and Assistants to purchase property following the fire at the King’s Head (21 February 1630/1). Mountford was elected Junior Warden for 1632-3 (29 September 1632). A recurrent dispute between him and William Willingham over precedence was resolved in favour of Mountford (3 December 1633 and 13 November 1634). He signed his name to a Company memorandum concerning appropriate apparel to be worn by liverymen (5 February 1634/5). He stood unsuccessfully in the election for Senior Warden (12 September 1636) but was reimbursed ‘for finding out a patent concerning the Company’ (13 October 1636). Mountford made his will on 1 June 1637, leaving £5 to his namesake – his ‘cousin’ and godson – son of his late brother Stephen, to be used to pay for an apprenticeship at the appropriate time. On the day of his marriage Oliver junior was also to be given a gold seal ring. Mountford’s brothers, Simon and Henry, were each left an item of clothing; his brother William was to receive 12d ‘in remembrance of my love and in full discharge of all he may challenge or demand of my goods, chattels or estate’. His two married sisters were also to receive 12d each. At the end of his faithful apprenticeship Nicholas Allen, his servant, was to be given ten scaffolding planks, six poles and four short ladders. The residue of his estate was bequeathed to his wife, Elizabeth, who obtained probate on 22 July 1637.[43] On 13 October 1637 Mrs Mountford paid the Company part of a legacy from her late husband (presumably a verbal request not included in the written will). Widow Mountford continued to pay arrearage of quarterage (13 October 1638 and 20 June 1645).

MOWAR, Richard (fl. 1581-3)

A Plasterer who was fined for lateness (25 January 1580/1) and for disobedience (1 December 1581). He paid his beadleship fine and presented John Morley I as his apprentice ‘before his tyme’ (16 August 1583).

MURPHY (MORFEILD, MORPHEW, MURFIELD, MURFEYLD, MURFFEE, MURFLEETE), John (fl. 1611-19)

A Plasterer who was the son of an Irish tailor, deceased, apprenticed to James Money for 8 years (9 September 1604). He was freed ‘one year before the terme of his Indenture’ (20 September 1611). His beadleship fine was paid (13 October 1617). On 5 February 1618/19 it was recorded that John Murphy was granted permission to present an apprentice, provided that he had paid £5 to his master, James Money, in lieu of serving one year as a journeyman, as he claimed; Murphy then presented Rowland Moynes, son of a Shropshire baker, for 7 years. On 24 September 1620 a warrant was issued by the Privy Council to one of the messengers of his Majesty’s Chamber to bring before their lordships ‘John Morphew’ and another plasterer, who had defected from the works at the Banqueting House, Whitehall.[44] When Moynes was freed on 6 March 1625/6, Widow Murphy paid arrearage of quarterage and was fined for not enrolling her apprentice. A payment of 1s 6d was made to Clare Murphy (25 January 1642/3) and Clare Murphy, ‘a poore widow’ received charitable payments (24 April, 25 July and 13 October 1643). On 17 February 1650/1 Lawrence Murphy, son of John, late Citizen and Plasterer of London, was made free by patrimony.

MURPHYN, John (fl. 1599)

A plasterer who married Margery Evans, widow, at the church of St Stephen Coleman Street on 16 January 1598/9.[45]


[1] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/016C, numbered for digitization 94.

[2] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[3] LMA DL/C/B/007/MS 09172/6A; will no. 58.

[4] LMA DL/C/B/007/MS 09172/22C; will no. 13.

[5] Loreen L Giese (ed), London Consistory Court Depositions, 1586-1611: List and Indexes, London Record Society, 32 (1995), pp. 130-1.

[6] LMA P71/OLA 009.

[7] HHA Bills 28.

[8] TNA REQ 2/405/80.

[9] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, f. 106v.

[10] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/022, f. 156.

[11] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/300/009.

[12] LMA P69/MGT3/B/014/MS 01176/001. Churchwardens’ Accounts 1576-1678.

13 Centre for Kentish Studies: U269, A2/2.

[14] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 85r, 95v, 106v, 120v, 130v, 138v.

[15] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/016.

[16] LMA DL/C/B/001/MS 09168/013.

[17] TNA E 36/245, f. 8.

[18] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.780, f. 187r.

[19] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.779, f. 32v.

[20] Nottingham University: Newcastle MS Ne.02

[21] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.781, f. 37r.

[22] BM Add. MS 10109, ff. 53v and 62v.

[23] BM Add. MS 10109, f. 141r.

[24] LMA DL/AL/C/003/MS 09051/004, f. 213.

[25] LMA DL/AL/C/001/MS 09051/004.

[26] LMA CLC/429/MS 02192. Extracts from the Court Book of the Plasterers’ Company, 19 September 1522-4 September 1525.

[27] TNA E 36/235, pp. 232 & 241.

[28] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.780, f. 50r.

[29] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.779, f. 32v.

[30] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.781, f. 43r.

[31] TNA E 101/474/26.

[32] Vanessa Harding & Laura Wright (eds), London Bridge: Selected Accounts and Rentals, 1381-1538, London Record Society 31 (1995), pp. 185, 192, 195-231, 233-41.

[33] C Welch (transl. & ed), Register of Freemen of the City of London in the reigns of Henry VIII and Edward VI, London (1908), p. 71.

[34] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/015, f. 88r.

[35] TNA E 36/235, p. 317.

[36] C P Curran, Dublin Decorative Plasterwork of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, London (1967), p. 99.

[37] C P Curran, Dublin Decorative Plasterwork of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, London (1967), p. 99.

[38] R E G Kirk & E F Kirk, Returns of Aliens dwelling in the City and Suburbs of London from the Reign of Henry VIII to that of James I, Huguenot Society Publications, Vol. 10, Aberdeen (1900-08), Part 2, p. 3..

[39] LMA P69/MIC1/A/001/MS 06986.

[40] TNA E 351/3267. Taskwork: Denmark House.

[41] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 95v, 188r, 220v, 228v.

[42] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/309.

[43] LMA DL/C/B/007/MS 09172/44; will no. 102.

[44] J R Dasent et al (eds), Acts of the Privy Council, London (1890-1964), vol. 37, p. 282, cited in H. Colvin et al, History of the King’s Works, Vol IV, London (1982), p. 329.

[45] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.