Gazetteer of Plasterers - G

GARD, William (fl. 1601-2)

A Plasterer presented by John Griffin (24 May 1594) who was freed (26 July 1601) and paid his beadleship fine (3 September 1601). He was fined for ill work in Phillip Lane (18 February 1601/2) and in Shepherd Alley (21 August 1602). He donated a silver spoon with his initials, W.G., on 24 September 1602, the last date on which his name appears in the Company records.

GARSETT (GARSYDE, GASSETT), Robert (fl. 1573-1605)

A Plasterer who paid his beadleship fine (8 August 1573) before his admission fine (6 August 1574). He made a voluntary donation for the Company’s goodwill (2 August 1577) and contributed to the costs of the Parliamentary bill concerning artificers (Court meeting, March 1580/1). Gassett and Richard Ratcliffe were in dispute with Lewis Genoway, the case to be settled by the arbitration of senior members of the Company (3 December 1595). Fines were imposed for: bad language (18 November 1580); ill work in Holborn (13 December 1595); and for not enrolling his man (14 October 1599). Garsett presented his first apprentice, Robert Fawcet, on 15 February 1576/7. Two unnamed apprentices followed (25 July 1584 and 7 September 1589), with Henry Law presented (23 July 1593; but turned over to John Jackson on 1 February 1593/4 and to John Leare on 13 August 1596). John Lamb was presented (13 March 1599/1600) and Kellam Roades, son of a Warwickshire yeoman, for 7 years (8 May 1601). Garsett died as a parishioner of St Botolph without Aldersgate, leaving an estate valued at £44 8s 8d. Administration of the estate was granted to his wife, Margerie, in 1605.[1] When freed, Kellam Roades agreed to serve Widow Garsett for one year as a journeyman (29 April 1608). The Quarterage Accounts record that Widow Garsett herself died in 1608.

Robert Garsett was a significant figure in the world of London plasterwork - a skilled plasterer who was able to carry out decorative work, none of which survives to demonstrate his expertise. In September 1587 he made a bargain with Sir John Petre ‘to make frets in the old parlour’ at Old Thorndon Hall, Essex, for £9. Richard Barfield and other London plasterers were already working at the site.[2] In partnership with Richard Ratcliffe he was working for the Skinners’ Company in 1596, where they carried out various work in the company’s hall and new parlour. They were paid £5 on 3 April and £6 on 1 May in part payment for ‘crestinge the seeling in the newe parlore’. On 29 June a final payment of £4 was made ‘in full discharge of theire bill for Fretting’.[3] He worked with Richard Stephenson at Syon House where they were paid £43 on 2 March 1605 for ‘the fretting of 5 chambers’.[4]

GARTWITH (GARTEWITHE), John (fl. 1567-71)

A plasterer working under Thomas Kellie at Greenwich Palace, where he was one of the men washing and whiting the Queen’s privy lodgings and ‘other places in the courte nedfull to be done’. He was paid in December 1567 (11d per day for 14 days) and January 1567/8 (12d per day for 9 days and 7 nights).[5] Although not listed there as an apprentice, he was returned to Roger Spence on 7 December 1571.

GATES, James (fl. 1613-41)

A Plasterer whose apprenticeship to Thomas Johnson (I or II?) was not recorded but who was freed on 21 May 1613. He signed his name to a Company memorandum concerning apprentices (23 February 1616/17) and paid his beadleship fine (4 August 1618). He spent an uneventful career in the Yeomanry of the Company, his only apprentice being John Raven, son of a Middlesex labourer, presented for 8 years (30 August 1627). Gates received charity on 27 January 1639/40, 13 October 1640 and 26 July 1641; but on 13 October 1641 his name was crossed through in the list of pensioners, so it is probable that he died that year.

GAYWOOD (GAYWOTTE), Francis (fl. 1547-76)

A plasterer who was much employed as one of the teams of plasterers working for Henry VIII in the Royal Works in the 1530s and 40s: at Oatlands in November-December 1537 he was one of those working day and night in the chapel and royal lodgings ‘for the hasty Expedicion of same’, earning 7s 7d at 7d per day.[6] From December 1538-January 1539 he was at Greenwich helping to repair the high Tower within the Park to seal Mr Long’s lodging from smoke from the kitchen below, where he was paid 7d per day.[7] He was at Canterbury in October-December 1539 preparing gypsum plaster for whiting the king’s lodging within and without; shooting floors with gypsum plaster, pargetting partitions with lime and hair, colouring with yellow ochre, pencilling the red ochred walls of the king’s privy lodging, earning 24s 8d at 8d per day.[8] In June 1539 he was at The More, plastering and whiting the walls and roof of the new standing and royal lodgings, at 7d per day.[9] For additional routine plastering in lodgings and offices at Greenwich between December 1541 and January 1542 he earned 8s 8d at 8d per day.[10] Returning to The More in October 1541 and February-March 1542, Gaywood was plastering in royal lodgings and offices with plaster of Paris and lime and hair at 7d per day, for which he received 7s 7d and 8s.[11] He earned 8s 8d working at Dartford from February-April 1542 at 8d per day; his work there between 25 June and 12 November was paid at 7d and 8d per day, and included ‘puryfyeng And Devyding the graye plaster from the whyte’ after burning it in the kiln; then whiting and colouring walls with size and yellow ochre.[12] Back at Greenwich in 1542-3 in he was engaged on more routine plastering in lodgings and offices at 8d per day, earning 14s 8d.[13] In 1547-8 he was paid 30s. ‘for playsterynge and whythynge the church after the defacynge of the ymages’ at the church of St Katharine Cree.[14] Gaywood married the widow ‘Bodwell’ (presumably the widow of Robert or William Bowedelle) of St Stephen Coleman Street on 23 May 1559.[15] He is likely to be the Francis Gaywood of St Sepulchre without Newgate, the administration of whose estate was recorded in 1576.[16]

GELGENER (GILGINER, GILGONER, GYLGENER), John (fl. 1602-5)

A Plasterer presented by John Welshe (14 October 1595), which makes it likely that he was John Welshe’s unnamed ‘man’ working with his master for 6 days at 12d per day at the Skinners’ Hall in March 1595/6.[17] Gelgener paid his abling fine on 10 December 1602. John Welshe was fined for ill language to his journeyman (11 February 1602/3) and William Wastney  was similarly fined for ill language to Gelgener (11 November 1603). His name is not recorded again after 23 April 1605, when he paid his beadleship fine.

GEORGE, George (fl. 1618-27)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Herefordshire butcher and was apprenticed to Thomas Henley for 8 years (27 February 1610/11). On 4 August 1618 Henley was fined for giving his man time off his apprenticeship and George paid his abling and freedom fines. He worked for just 1 day at 2s per day under James Leigh at Chelsea House, c 1620.[18] He paid arrearage of quarterage on 1 September 1626 and was listed in the Quarterage Accounts in the Yeomanry until 1627; his name was crossed through in 1628.

GENOWAY (GENNEWAYE, GENNOWE, GINNAWAY, GINNER, GREENWAY, GYNAWAYE, GYNNER), Lewis (fl. 1578-1612)

A Plasterer who was presented by William Austen in 1571 and admitted to the Company on 15 September 1578.’Lewes Greenwaye’ was the plasterer employed by the Merchant Taylors’ Company on several occasions. In 1589 he was paid for 'working on the fretted Sylinge under the Skreene' at the company hall.[19] In October 1592 Greenway was paid at the rate of 16d. per day for work there, alongside Owen Evans, ‘Goodman Kerby’ and ‘Goodman bornell’. He was working there again, together with his boy (presumably Owen Evans), for 6 days at 10d per day in December 1592.[20] An unexplained controversy arose between Genoway on one side and Richard Ratcliffe and Robert Garsett on the other, which was to be settled by senior members of the Company – Edmund Essex and Thomas Gower representing Genoway (3 December 1595). On 24 April 1602 Robert Gynnowe gave money ‘for the use of his brother Lewes’. After paying part of his contribution towards the Ireland plantations on 8 July 1613 he was, together with James March, ‘committeed’. The remainder of the money due for Ireland was paid off on 3 September 1613. Genoway presented his first apprentice, Hugh Morris (ap Randall) on 8 March 1582/3. Subsequent apprentices were: Owen Evans (23 April 1590); Edward ap Powell (30 July 1591); John Shambrooke (7 February 1592/3); Maurice Price (22 February 1604/5). On 30 January 1606/7 Price was turned over to Richard Browne for the remainder of his term, as his master ‘is gon into the countrey’; but it was noted that Price ‘did departe away from the said Mr Browne the 21 January last 1607/8’ (29 January 1607/8). John Price (29 July 1608) was, presumably,   ‘Gynawayes man [who] was fetched from the Compter (23 April 1611). His son, Richard, was freed by patrimony (4 November 1612). Genoway was fined for evil work at the Three Cranes, Thames Street (9 July 1586); ill work (11 February 1591/2 and 15 June 1593). He was listed among the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1612 but noted as ‘dead’ in 1613.

GENOWAY, Richard (fl. 1612-28)

A Plasterer who was freed by patrimony as the ‘son of Lewys’ on 4 November 1612. He probably pursued a different career from his father as his name appears only in the Quarterage Accounts, from 1612-25 and 1628; and he is not listed thereafter.

GIBBS, William (fl. 1618-33)

A Plasterer presented by Edmond Hall (26 January 1610/11) who was freed on 27 May 1618.

His name appears in the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts for 1617-23 and 1626-33, when the accounts cease.

GIBSON, Richard (fl. 1581-1607)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to John Betaugh (3 July 1573) and paid his abling and admission fines on 26 May 1581. He was fined for lateness (22 April 1583) and an unspecified fine was paid on his behalf by William Echell (26 July 1585). He presented: John Hill (28 April 1587); William Hallam (24 July 1594); Samuel Kelly (25 January 1594/5), whose abling fine was paid ‘per Mr Gibson (18 February 1601/2); Francis Graves, son of a Lincolnshire tailor, for 8 years (26 July 1602); Thomas Abbott (15 August 1605). Ill work was fined: in Paul’s Chayne (9 August 1594); in St Clement’s Lane (14 August 1601); in Bishopsgate Street (1 August 1605). Gibson was in receipt of charity from the Company on 5 August 1602. His name was listed in the Quarterage Accounts until 1607, when it was replaced from 1608-10 by that of Widow Gibson. Widow Gibson’s man (presumably Thomas Abbott) was sent to the Compter on 4 September 1611.

GILBERT (GYLBERT), Adam (fl. 1621-7)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Northamptonshire yeoman, apprenticed to Richard Ratcliffe for 7 years (25 July 1603). He was turned over to Mr [John] Langford (5 December 1611) and freed on 16 August 1622. He was listed as one of the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts from 1621-7 but his name was crossed through in 1628.

GILSON (GILLSON), John (fl. 1605-23)

A Plasterer whose name first appears in the Company records when he was fined for evil work in Little Britain (5 June 1605). Ill work resulted in further fines: in Thames Street (11 September 1606); in Smithfield (22 June 1608); at an unspecified site, in partnership with Richard Morland I (30 November 1610); in Foster Lane and Paternoster Row (4 November 1612); in Paternoster Row (29 January 1612/13); in Pannier Alley (13 January 1614/15). On 26 May 1607 he was penalised for setting a boy to work in Long Lane against Company Ordinances. Neale Carrell was apprenticed to him (6 November 1607). On 17 July 1614 the Company made payments for materials and wages arising from repairs to the Hall and 9s 2d was paid to Mr Gilson and his man. Gilson was sent to the Compter on 2 December 1614 for an unspecified offence. On 13 January 1614/15 he was fined for giving Neale Carrell one year off his apprenticeship without permission; and he then presented Robert Lover, son of a Northamptonshire yeoman for 8 years. A memorandum of 25 July 1615 recorded that ‘John Gilson, a brother of this Companie departinge into Ireland did freely give to this company the wainscot, painted cloth & a Courte Cubbard & a presse which were in the chamber over the parler’, where he had been a tenant of the Company. In 1616 John Gilson, plasterer, was admitted to the freedom of the City of Dublin.[21] Nevertheless, his name continued to be listed in the Quarterage Accounts until 1623 and was crossed through in 1624.

GLASER, William (fl. 1609)

A plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate recorded in the parish register at the burial of his daughter Catherine on 27 September 1609.[22]

GODBEHEARE, John I (fl. 1597-1602)

A Plasterer apprenticed to William Piggen the Younger, who was fined for keeping his servant unbound for six months (8 May 1590). Godbeheare paid his abling fine on 19 August 1597. A fine for ill work was levied on 15 July 1598. On 8 May 1601 payment was recorded for searching Church books for the marriage of John Godbeheare in St Clements Eastcheap. Luke Sprignell, son of a Nottinghamshire yeoman, was apprenticed to him for 8 years (24 June 1602), the last occasion on which his name is recorded in the Company records. William Piggen’s will confirms that John I was the father of John II.

GODBEHEARE (GODBY, GODBYHERE), John II (fl. 1622-33)

A Plasterer who, as the son of John Godbeheare I, was made free by patrimony, having been apprenticed to Jonas Wattes (who does not appear to have been a plasterer) on 29 March 1622. John Clarke, son of an Oxfordshire yeoman, was apprenticed to him for 8 years (25 January 1622/3; freed 25 January 1630/1). Richard Askewe, son of a deceased London Haberdasher, put himself apprentice for 8 years (11 July 1623). Similarly, Thomas Wildon, son of a deceased Yorkshire husbandman, was apprenticed for 8 years (21 June 1631). William Piggen the Younger (master of John I) was his godfather and left him £10 in his will, which was proved 5 June 1621.[23] Godbeheare’s name is listed in the Quarterage Accounts until 1633, when the records cease.

GODBEHEARE, Peirce/Percivall/Pierse (fl. 1602-35)

A Plasterer who was presented anonymously by Ellis Piggen (10 June 1591) and turned over to John Tyrrell (2 December 1597). A memorandum of 25 July 1602 recorded that 50s was to be paid to the Company in instalments by George Ashbridge and John Slared, on behalf of Pierse Godbeheare. On 26 July 1602 Pierse’s abling fine was paid by Ellis Piggen; and Godbeheare paid his own beadleship fine (29 August 1604). Ellis Piggen was then fined for arresting Perce without permission of the Company (5 June 1605). On his admission into the freedom Godbeheare donated a gilt spoon with his initials (15 August 1605). He made his mark as a witness to the Company memorandum concerning apprenticeships (23 February 1616/17) and was one of the men who caused payments to be made by the Company in some unspecified ‘business’ (13 September 1619). On 5 September 1621 he was elected to the Livery but paid the fine for refusing to accept election. Robert Viccars was presented (10 July 1607); Thomas Simms (1 July 1608); Peregrine Moores from Somerset for 8 years (1 May 1617); John Browne was turned over to him from William Widmore (23 April 1635). Fines were imposed: for bad work, with Stephen Bricknell (29 April 1613); for ill work in Philpott Lane (12 May 1613); for not enrolling his servant, Thomas Simms, when the latter was freed (29 August 1616); for bad work in three places (1 May 1617). William Piggen the Younger left £30 to Peirce and his wife Anne in his will, which was proved 5 June 1621.[24]

GODSAY (GODFREY, GODSAE, GODSEY, GODSEE), William (fl. 1606; d. 1639)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, recorded in the parish registers at: his marriage to Catherine Drabbler on 2 November 1606; the baptisms of his sons, John (5 April 1615), John (13 September 1618) and Thomas (16 January 1619/20); and the burial of his son John (11 October 1618) and his servant Mary (31 October 1625). William Godsey was buried at St Giles Cripplegate on 22 February 1638/9.[25] He was apprenticed to William Wastney (25 July 1598) and freed on 4 July 1606, when he presented the Company with a white [silver] spoon and paid the fine in lieu of serving a journeymanship year. He refused to pay the beadleship fine (9 September 1608) and made part payment of ‘duties’ (25 June 1613); part of Godsay’s debt was then paid on two occasions by Robert Maddox (8 July 1613 and 3 September 1613). Godsay was fined for evil work in Seething Lane (28 April 1607).

GOFFNEY, Richard (fl. 1559)

One of seven plasterers who worked under Patrick Kellie in the long gallery at Whitehall Palace in May 1559, in preparation for the visit of the French embassy.[26] Goffney was paid at the rate of 10d. per day for six days’ work.

GOLDSBOROUGH, Bartholomew (fl. 1622-5)

A Plasterer, son of a Durham labourer, who was apprenticed to Henry Brigges for 8 years (2 December 1614). He was freed on 29 March 1622 and paid his beadleship fine on 11 August 1624. He was listed as a member of the Yeomanry in the Quarterage Accounts until 1625.

GOLDSMITH, John (fl. 1603; d. 1604)

A Plasterer who was presented by Richard Browne on 6 February 1595/6. Browne was fined for ill work by his apprentice in Drury Lane (10 December 1602) and paid his abling fine (11 February 1602/3). Goldsmith was fined for setting his (unnamed) boy to work and for ill work at Mr Cadwelle’s at Ludgate (24 November 1603) and again, for keeping his boy unbound above six months (6 July 1604). He was buried at St Bride Fleet Street on 14 September 1604.[27]

GOODALL (GOODALE), James (fl. 1622-39)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Bristol labourer, apprenticed to John Langford for 7 years (14 June 1615). He was turned over to Warden [Robert] Whiting as the apprentice of Henry Brigges (5 February 1621/2), following the death of Langford in 1620. He paid his abling fine (20 July 1622) and made a free gift to the Company (14 November 1623). His beadleship fine followed on 25 January 1625/6. He was fined: for bad work (29 May 1627) and for not serving one year as a journeyman (25 July 1627). Eusabie Gurrey, son of a Northamptonshire yeoman, was apprenticed to him for 8 years (25 July 1627; freed 3 July 1635). On election to the Livery Goodall made a gift to the Company of £3 in addition to paying for his ‘patterne of cloth’ (11 May 1629). Together with John Smith (the Elder) he was fined for bad work at Duke Humphry’s (7 May 1630). As a Liveryman he signed his name, agreeing to pay 40s towards the cost of purchasing two tenements after the Company’s property, the King’s Head, burnt down (21 February 1630/1). A fine for bad work was levied (22 March 1632/3). When Gurrey was freed, Goodall presented Richard Swayt, son of a Berkshire fishmonger, for 7 years (3 July 1635). He was soon followed by John Jeffery, son of a Wiltshire shepherd, for 7 years (13 October 1635; freed 5 December 1644). Goodall was unsuccessful in the election for Junior Warden for 1639-40 (9 September 1639), which was the last occasion on which his name appeared in the records. Mrs Goodalle paid arrearage of quarterage on 5 December 1644.

GOODSONE, George (fl. 1568)

A plasterer employed by the Royal Works during the Queen’s Progress in the summer of 1568. He worked for 15 days alongside Richard Brigges and others at Enfield, ‘new whiting and plastering sundry faults in the purveyor’s lodging and abowte the howse’, at 12d per day.[28]

GORDON, Robert (fl. 1589)

A Plasterer whose name is only recorded when he paid his beadleship fine on 25 July 1589.

GORTON, Thomas (fl. 1601-4)

A Plasterer presented by Thomas Browne (24 July 1594), who paid the abling fine on behalf of his apprentice (1 August 1601). Gorton donated a ‘white’ [silver] spoon with T.G. to the Company (10 September 1602). It was noted in the Quarterage Accounts for 1605 that he had died.

GOWER (GORE), Raphe (fl. 1593; d. 1598)

A Plasterer presented by Edmund Harrison (16 November 1586), who was freed 13 December 1593. He paid his beadleship fine on 23 August 1594, the last date on which his name appears in the Company records. Gower, who lived in Charterhouse Lane in the parish of St Sepulchre without Newgate, made his final will while sick on 23 July 1598.[29] He bequeathed a tenement on Shoe Lane in the tenure of one Christopher Palmer, Stationer, to the child that was still in his wife’s womb. Gower held the lease from Edward Lent, Gentleman, dated 2 November 1595. He left 10s. each to his sister Margaret Hand and her daughter Helen. The rest of his goods were left to his wife Mary, who was named executrix. Probate was granted on 1 August 1598. The will was witnessed by Richard Dungan and John Lowe.

GOWER (GOARE, GOORE, GORE, GOWAR), Thomas (fl. 1576; d. 1598)

A Plasterer who became free on May Day 1576 (13 October 1576. The clerk’s entry giving 1577 must be an error). On 23 November 1576 the Company received 20s ‘of Watson’s man Thomas Gower’. This presumably referred to Gower’s ex-master, who would have been Henry Watson, who died 1575. Gower paid his abling and admission fines on 15 February 1576/7. On 25 July 1581 he contributed to the costs of the Company’s lawsuit. He presented Richard Cobb (6 April 1582) and was fined for releasing him one year early without consent (23 January 1589/90). His next apprentice was Luke Gill (23 April 1590), followed by [blank] Milner (30 July 1591) and John Hoare (presented anonymously on 23 August 1594). He was fined for disobedience (9 December 1586). Gower rose quickly in the Company hierarchy and on 17 September 1585 he paid for his pattern for the livery. He served as Junior Warden for 1593-4 (12 September 1593) and was one of the arbitrators selected to resolve the dispute between Richard Ratcliffe, Robert Garsett and Lewis Genoway (3 December 1595). He signed his name as Thomas Goore to the discharge of a Company bond (23 December 1596). On 13 October 1597 he was elected Senior Warden for 1597-8 but on 25 March 1598 it was noted that ‘Mr Goare being dead, a newe election to be made of another in his place’. Gower was a parishioner of St Vedast Foster Lane; a daughter Anne was baptised at his parish church on 28 October 1587.[30] Following his death, leaving his widow Julian, his estate was valued at £300 9d by the Court of Orphans in 1598.[31]

GRAVES, Gavin/Gawen (fl. 1626-47)

A Plasterer who was the son of a Cumberland butcher, apprenticed to William Whiting for 7 years; Whiting was fined for setting his boy to work ‘unbound’ (30 June 1618). Graves paid his abling fine (25 January 1625/6). He paid fines for evil speeches against the Master and Wardens, for evil work and for his beadleship (13 June 1628); and for absence (26 January 1628/9). Henry Robinson, son of a Gloucestershire tiler, was apprenticed to him for 8 years (23 April 1634). He was followed by William Charnock from Leicestershire for 7 years (13 November 1634; freed 2 December 1641). On 2 February 1636/7 Graves paid the fines due on entering the Livery, for bad work and for absence (1 August 1639). A memorandum of 4 December 1639 recorded that he was dismissed from the Livery for refusing both to acknowledge his evil speeches to the Master and the Company in general (‘he would not be sensored by a Company of Geese’) and to pay the fine for his unseemly and immodest behaviour. Graves paid for his ‘ill speeches and other abuses’ and he was readmitted to the Livery, after paying up and promising not to re-offend (4 February 1639/40). On 3 September 1645 he stood unsuccessfully for election as Junior Warden for 1645-6; he was equally unsuccessful the following year (14 September 1646). He was again dismissed from the Livery for bad language, drunkenness, lewdness, etc, which might explain his failure to be elected (6 September 1647). This was the last occasion on which his name appeared and on 2 December 1652 charity was paid to the widow of Gawen Graves.

GRAVES, Richard I (fl. 1603-17)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to Richard Stephenson (3 December 1595), the master being fined for binding a boy before he himself had served one year as a journeyman. Stephenson paid Graves’ abling fine (11 February 1603) and Graves donated a white [silver] spoon when he paid his beadleship fine (29 August 1604). He was committed [to the Compter] (25 January 1608) but presented his own apprentice, Richard Oker (8 June 1608). He was fined for evil work (27 October 1608) and a payment was made to the Clerk for copying information against Graves (23 April 1613). Graves worked for 8 days, earning 2s per day, at the Charterhouse in July-August 1614.[32] On 20 July 1615 Graves drew up his will, as a parishioner of St Sepulchre without Newgate.[33] Very detailed instructions were given to his executrix, his wife Elizabeth. Within one year of his death she was to sell the property in Berkhampsted St Peter, Hertfordshire, which he hadinherited from her brothers, Thomas and John Rogers. £35 from the sale was to go to Thomas Rogers or his heirs. An inventory of his remaining goods was to be made and divided into three equal parts: one to his wife; one to his children, Richard II and Elizabeth; and one to create a legacy for his father, Richard (20s) while his servant, Richard Oker, was to receive his scaffolding poles, planks, cleats, sieves and ladders – except the two longest ladders. Any residue was to be used for his wife and children. The overseers and witnesses of the will included his friend John Langford, Plaisterer. The will was proved on 2 or 12 September 1617. On 29 August 1616 Graves had paid the fine for refusing to enter the Livery and presented William Hayward, son of a Northamptonshire labourer, for 8 years. On 23 February 1616/17 he put his mark to the Company memorandum concerning apprentices, the last date on which his name appears in the records. His widow paid quarterage from 1616 but is noted as ‘died’ in 1620.

GRAVES, Richard II (fl. 1627-33)

On 1 May 1627 ‘Richard Graves, son of Richard I, a brother of this Company, deceased, was this daie uppon testimony of his age made free by patrymonie & paied accordingly’. Graves paid quarterage until 1633, when the accounts cease.

GREENE, Abraham (fl. 1607)

A plasterer who was one of the large team ‘beautifying the hall’ of the Merchant Taylors’ Company prior to a royal visit in 1607, for which they were paid 2s per day.[34]  

GREENE, Henry I (fl. 1599; d.1632)

A Plasterer of St Giles Cripplegate, recorded in the parish registers at his marriage to Anne Ware (28 August 1599); the baptisms of a son Henry (24 August 1600); a son Cornelius (20 April 1610) and a son John (1 September 1615); and the burials of a servant named Elizabeth Evans (10 September 1603) and a daughter Sarah (22 May 1610).[35] Greene was apprenticed to John Hopper (26 April 1591) but was turned over from Widow Hopper to Edmond Essex (7 March 1597/8). A caveat was taken out against Greene (29 November 1598) and he was sent to the Compter (28 April 1599). He paid his abling fine and made payments to Mrs Hopper on 25 June 1599. He was sent to the Compter again (6 February 1600/01) but paid his beadleship fine (3 September 1601). He was fined for keeping a boy unbound for more than six months when he presented Abraham Eyrdall (1 August 1605). In 1607 he was another of the team paid 2s per day by the Merchant Taylors’ Company when their hall was ‘beautified’ prior to a royal visit.[36] On 2 August 1611 a gift was made to Greene, a poor brother of the Company, as he and his wife were very sick. His fines encompassed: evil work (4 July 1606); not enrolling Abraham Eyrdall (25 June 1613); lateness (13 October 1618). His apprentice, John Prior from Bedfordshire, seems to have proved troublesome. He was presented for 8 years (25 June 1613) but William Whitinge was instructed to return Prior to Henry Greene and if the latter refused to accept him the Company was to dispose of him (15 March 1615/16). Henry Greene’s man was committed on 23 April 1616; and Greene was ordered to make amends to Whitinge as their arrangement concerning Prior was contrary to the orders of the house (30 April 1616). Greene presented William Ware, son of a Hertfordshire tailor, for 7 years (2 September 1618; freed 15 July 1645). His own son, Henry II, was freed by patrimony (5 June 1621). From this date it is impossible to be certain whether it is father or son who is referred to when arrearage of quarterage is recorded or when a fine for bad work in several places is levied (9 September 1630), until the death of Henry Greene I is noted in the Quarterage Accounts for 1632. Stephen Greene, son of Henry, late Citizen and Plasterer of London, was apprenticed to Roger Wastney on 13 October 1644 and freed on 2 December 1652.

GREENE, Henry II (fl. 1621-49)

A Plasterer freed by patrimony as the son of Henry Greene I (5 June 1621). From this date it is impossible to be certain whether it is father or son who is referred to when arrearage of quarterage is recorded or when a fine for bad work in several places is levied (9 September 1630), until the death of Henry Greene I is noted in the Quarterage Accounts for 1632. Abraham Parker, son of a Shropshire shoemaker, was apprenticed to Henry Greene (25 July 1626; freed 18 July 1633). Greene next took Edington Fisher, son of a Wiltshire tailor, as his apprentice for 8 years (7 November 1633). He was last recorded paying arrearage on 4 December 1649. On 25 July 1656 Henry Greene [III], son of Henry, deceased, was freed by patrimony.

GREENE, William (fl. 1549)

One of six plasterers who worked under Patrick Kellie at Westminster Palace in late October and early November 1549.[37]

GREENHILL (GREENILL, GRENNELL), Richard (fl. 1608-49)

 A Plasterer, son of Thomas, a Hertford yeoman, apprenticed to John Humfrey for 8 years (6 February 1600/1) and freed 5 March 1607/8. He paid his beadleship fine (21 August 1609) and presented his brother William Greenhill for 7 years (29 April 1613). Richard was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 23 April 1649.

GREENHILL, (GREENEHALL, GREENILL, GRENILL, GREENOWAY) William (fl.  1621-53)

A Plasterer, son of Thomas, a Hertford yeoman, apprenticed to his brother, Richard Greenhill for 7 years (29 April 1613). He paid his abling fine (5 June 1621) and was fined for absence (13 October 1630). On 21 February 1638/9 Anthony Atkins, son of a Hertfordshire chandler, was apprenticed to him for 7 years (turned over to William Smith on 4 December 1639, to Rowland Moynes on 25 January 1642/3 and freed 3 April 1646). Greenhill’s son William was admitted to the Company without swearing an oath, presumably on religious grounds, on 23 April 1649. Samuel Bird, son of a Surrey baker, was apprenticed to him for 7 years (15 June 1649). William Greenehill ‘thelder’ last paid arrearage of quarterage on 11 August 1653, when his apprentice Samuel Bird was turned over to William Greenehill the sonne. (Bird was freed on 1 July 1656).

GRIFFIN, Evan (fl. 1621-4)

A Plasterer, son of Griffin Evan, a Shropshire tailor, who was presented by Thomas Davies for 7 years (13 April 1614). His abling fine was paid on 5 June 1621 and he was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 12 March 1623/4; the same year in which his name last appeared in the Quarterage Accounts.

GRIFFIN (GRYFFYN), John (fl. 1586-1603)

A Plasterer who paid his abling fine and made a payment for the poor on 9 December 1586. In that same month he had been working as Richard Barfield’s man at Old Thorndon Hall, Essex, where he was paid for whiting five roofs [ceilings], receiving 12d per day, plus meat, drink and lodging. He was working there again with Barfield in July 1587 but in April 1590 he made a bargain on his own account; and in May 1590 he was accompanied by Edward Robinson II, another of Barfield’s apprentices.[38] Griffin’s first apprentice was John Ellis (27 April 1593), followed by William Gard (24 May 1594). When he worked with others at the Skinners’ Company Hall in 1596 he was paid on May 22 for 6 days at 16d per day.[39] On 5 November 1596 a memorandum recorded the settling of a debt owed to William Barrye by John Griffin. On 8 May 1601 the Company paid the costs of the suit brought against the Master [Hugh Capp] by Griffin’s man. After Gard was freed Griffin presented Lewes Yappe, son of a Welsh yeoman, for 8 years (3 November 1601). On 25 July 1603 Griffin received charity from the Company and on 24 November of that year Randall Clarkson paid for the turning over of John Griffyn’s boy. Griffin appears to have died in 1603 as his widow, Jane, paid quarterage in 1604. She was in receipt of benevolence (26 January 1611) and became a quarterly pensioner (26 April 1611), until her death was recorded on 25 January 1624/5.

GRIGGES (GRIGGS, GRIGS), Edward (fl. 1621-7)

A Plasterer, son of Thomas, who was apprenticed to Edward Brooke (27 October 1611). While still an apprentice Grigges was employed as part of the team working under Kelham Roades at the Charterhouse, earning 12d per day. In October-November 1613 he worked 17 days and from April-July 1614 the total was 39 days.[40] He paid his abling fine on 23 April 1621. Francis Pickell, apprentice of Richard Ratcliffe, was turned over to him on 23 April 1624. According to the Quarterage Accounts, Grigge paid his dues as a member of the Yeomanry until 1627 but had died by 1628.

GRIGGES (GRIGG), Thomas (fl. 1614-40)

A Plasterer apprenticed to James Stanley on 6 November 1607 but presented by him again, as the son of Edward, a Cambridgeshire yeoman, for 8 years on 29 January 1607/8. He was freed as the apprentice of Robert Betaugh on 11 November 1614. He was fined for bad work in two places (3 August 1621) but was admitted to the Livery on 5 September that year. His first apprentice was Thomas Worship, son of a Northamptonshire tailor, for 7 years (19 November 1629). He paid to have John Wilson turned over to him from John Walton (10 February 1630/1); but Wilson was turned over again, this time to Robert Cooper, because of his master’s assaults and threats to his life (21 March 1631/2). Richard Scruggs from Bedfordshire was apprenticed for 7 years (25 July 1632). Grigges was dismissed from the Livery on 4 September 1632 on account of his many misdemeanours and was not reinstated. On 10 September 1638 payment was made ‘for when we went about Grigg before the Chamberlain’. Grigges was last recorded paying arrearage of quarterage on 27 January 1639/40.

GROVE, John I (fl. 1611-54)[41]

The son of Thomas Grove, a London Joiner, who was apprenticed to Edward Robinson the Younger for 8 years (10 December 1602). Having gained his freedom (27 February 1610/11) Grove paid his quarterage fines but appears to have played little part in Company affairs until 1631, when he was one of the members contributing a free gift towards the rebuilding of the Corner House (9 December 1631). Despite this, Grove must have fallen foul of the Company ordinances as a suit was brought against him. The Master and Wardens were forced to raise a loan of £20 to finance this suit, among others (1 February 1637/8); and the Clerk was reimbursed for payments made in connection with ‘Mr Grove’s suite’, including visits to Westminster, the Clink, etc. (14 March 1637/8). Further payments arose: £5 1s to Mr Marsh for his charges laid out about Mr Grove’s business (28 May 1638); re Grove’s business (2 July 1638); £8 was delivered to Mr Marsh, of which £3 came from the Master and Wardens of the Bricklayers’ Company (1 August 1638); a further £9 13s was received from several companies who had become involved in the litigation (14 September 1640). On 1 November 1640, however, Grove was enrolled in the ranks of the Honorable Artillery Company.[42] He was once referred to as Captayne Grove in the Company records (4 June 1641) and was probably one of the Captains of Trained Bands, although his name does not appear in the card index of Trained Bands held by the HAC. In 1641 the dispute with the Company seems finally to have been resolved. On 4 June the Warden was reimbursed for expenses laid out about ‘the tryall with Captayne Grove’, including payments to the Recorder, to Mr Walker, a Counsellor, the jury and the Sheriff ‘for the allowance & retorne of the writ, etc’. Finally, on 2 June Mr Grove paid the Company £15 ‘being soe much as was recovered of him by verdict’ and the Clerk’s expenses in the suit were settled.

On 5 November 1640 his apprentice, John Grove II, was made free and paid his abling fine, without having been presented earlier; nor is his relationship with his master clarified. He was not freed by patrimony so may have been a nephew rather than a son of John Grove I. Subsequent references to payment of arrearages and apprentices could refer to either man. On 16 December 1649 Christopher Hodgson, apprentice of John Walters, was turned over to John Grove (freed by 25 January 1655/6); and on 25 January 1641/2 Anthony Tucke, son of a Victualer from Rochester, Kent, apprenticed himself to John Grove for 8 years (freed 11 March 1652). On 23 June 1654 a memorandum recorded that two new plasterers were to be presented to the Master and Wardens of the Merchant Taylors’ Company, one of them to become a pensioner ‘in the rome and place of John Grove deceased’.

GROVE, Thomas (fl. 1623)

A Plasterer who was apprenticed to John Pitcher on 5 April 1611 and turned over to James Money on 25 January 1613/14. Neighbours testified on 7 February 1616/17 that James Money’s apprentice, Thomas Grove, had been ‘a lewd & disorderly servant keeping ill howers’. On 29 April 1618 he was turned over again, this time to Thomas Noden. There is no record of his freedom but on 29 September 1623 Thomas Grove married Anne Guest, daughter of Raphe Guest, at All Saints’ Church, Wandsworth, which suggests that he was working beyond the jurisdiction of the City and the Company.

GRYMYNGE, John (fl. 1559)

One of seven plasterers who worked under Patrick Kellie in the long gallery at Whitehall Palace in May 1559 in preparation for the visit of the French embassy.[43] Grymynge was paid at the rate of 10d. per day and 1d. per hour.

GUEST (GEST), Rafe/Raphe (fl. 1579; d. 1613)

A Plasterer who was admitted to the Company on 25 July 1579. Raphe, the first of many children, was born later that year and baptised at St Andrew, Holborn (17 November 1579); Thomas (4 March 1580/1); William (20 February 1582/3). Subsequent baptisms were recorded at St Augustine, Watling Street: Sara (15 August 1585); Mary (14 May 1587); Ellice (6 March 1588/9); Margery (1 August 1591); Elizabeth (6 August 1592); Anne (10 March 1593/4); Samuel (23 March 1595/6); John (8 July 1599). An infant Raphe was buried there (9 June 1603). His son Ellys was presented by Robert Plowman for 9 years when he was only 12 years old (23 April 1601) but did not complete his apprenticeship. His daughter Anne married Thomas Grove (29 September 1623).[44]

Guest paid his beadleship fine and contributed towards the cost of the Company’s Parliamentary bill (25 July 1581). On 25 July 1583 he took Bartholomew Higges as his apprentice and paid more to have him bound 1½ years ‘before his time’. Subsequent apprentices were: Joseph Hopkins (16 March 1587); James Powell (24 April 1594); Henry Sheppye (16 June 1598); William Cockerell (turned over from Robert Plowman 27 March 1601); William Brase (1 August 1605); Edward Tarry (30 June 1608); Thomas Clarke (10 September 1610); Thomas Hill (25 July 1611); Hugh Corbyn, late apprentice of Raph Guest and after turned over to John Allen, was freed (20 September 1611); James Davys (11 June 1612); John Rowe, apprentice of Mr Guest, was freed on 25 January 1613/14. Guest incurred fines for disobedience (16 November 1586); for ill work in St Thomas ‘Apples’ (5 May 1603); for lateness (22 February 1604/5); for evil work and lateness (25 April 1605); for evil work without Ludgate (6 November 1605); for ill work in Watling Street (25 April 1606); for absence from a Court meeting (24 August 1612).

Guest paid for his pattern for the Livery (9 August 1594) and following the death of Mr Thomas Gower he was sworn in as Junior Warden for the remaining half year (28 March 1598). On 14 October 1599 he acted as deputy for Henry Stanley, Junior Warden, at a Court meeting. He was elected Senior Warden for 1602-3 and Master for 1609-10 and 1613-14 (13 September 1613). It was recorded on 8 November 1613 that Guest had died and Richard Ratcliffe was sworn in as Master for the remainder of the term. A memorandum of 15 November recorded that Raphe Guest, deceased, had a son, Samuel, whom he brought up as a plasterer. His Executor asked the Company to take care of him and Mr Ratcliffe undertook to do this and to instruct him until he was old enough to become free by patrimony.

GUEST, Samuel (1596-1619)

A Plasterer who was being trained as a plasterer by his father, Raphe Guest, without undergoing a formal apprenticeship. A memorandum of 15 November 1613 recorded that the Executor of Raphe Guest, deceased, asked the Company to take care of Samuel and Mr [Richard] Ratcliffe undertook to do this and to instruct him until he was old enough to become free by patrimony. Samuel gained his freedom by patrimony on 30 April 1616. On 23 February 1616/17 he was among the signatories (as Sameuell Gest) to a Company memorandum. He remained in the Yeomanry until 1619, the last year in which his name appeared in the Quarterage Accounts.


[1] LMA DL/AL/C/001/MS 09050/004, f. 288.

[2] Essex CRO: D/DP A18-22, transcribed by Professor Malcolm Airs; A C Edwards, ‘Sir John Petre and Some Elizabethan London Tradesmen’, London Topographical Record, 23 (1974), pp. 72-3; J C Ward & K Marshall, Old Thorndon Hall, Essex Record Office Publications, 61, Chelmsford (1972).

[3] LMA CLC/L/SE/D/007/MS 30727/004, ff. 305-6, 309.

[4] The Northumberland Estates: U.I.13, ‘A booke of Disbursementes for workes done att Sion, March 1604 – March 1605’, p. 45.

[5] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, ff. 7v, 30r.

[6] TNA E 36/237, f. 792.

[7] Nottingham University: Newcastle MS Ne.02.

[8] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.779, ff. 7r, 32r, 53r.

[9] Nottingham University: Newcastle MS Ne.02.

[10] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.781, f. 11v.

[11] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.781, ff. 43r, 77r.

[12] Nottingham University: Newcastle Ne.03; Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson D.783, ff. 170r, 188r.

[13] BL Add MS 10109, f. 53v.

[14] TNA E 117/4/32.

[15] LMA P69/STE1/A/001/MS 04448.

[16] LMA DL/C/B/001/MS 09168/013, f. 141.

[17] LMA CLC/L/SE/D/007/MS 30727/004.

[18] Centre for Kentish Studies: U269/1, AP45.

[19] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/006.

[20] LMA CLC/L/MD/G/243/MS 34348, ff. 30, 32, 40.

[21] C P Curran, Dublin Decorative Plasterwork of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries, London (1967), p. 99.

[22] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[23] TNA PROB 11/137, ff. 500-503.

[24] TNA PROB 11/137, ff. 500-503.

[25] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002; P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/003.

[26] TNA E 101/474/26.

[27] LMA P69/BRI/A/004/MS 06538.

[28] Bodleian Library MS Rawlinson A.195.c, f. 244v.

[29] LMA DL/C/B/006/MS 09172/018D, numbered for digitization 30.

[30] W A Littledale (ed), The Registers of St Vedast, Foster Lane and of St Michael le Querne, London, Harleian Society, 29, Vol I Christenings (1902), p. 16.

[31] LMA CLA/002/01/001/f. 99r.

[32] LMA ACC/1876/F/09/48.

[33] LMA DL/C/B/004/MS 09171/023, f. 91v.

[34] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[35] LMA P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/001; P69/GIS/A/002/MS 06419/002.

[36] LMA CLC/L/MD/D/003/MS 34048/009.

[37] TNA E 101/474/19.

[38] Essex CRO: D/DP, A 20-21.

[39] LMA CLC/L/SE/D/007/MS 30727/004-5, f. 306.

[40] LMA ACC/1876/F/099/48.

[41] This John Grove seems to have been the founder of the plastering dynasty prominent in the 17th century and pre-dates the John Grove I listed by Geoffrey Beard, Decorative Plasterwork in Great Britain, London (1975), p. 222.

[42] Lt-Col G A Raikes (ed), The Ancient Vellum Book of the Honorable Artillery Company, being the Roll of Members from 1611 to 1682, London (1890), p. 59.

[43] TNA E 101/474/26.

[44] Details of Guest’s children retrieved from Mormon IGI microfiche.